Propofol (Diprivan®)



Yüklə 22,2 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix18.04.2017
ölçüsü22,2 Kb.

Drug Enforcement Administration 

Office of Diversion Control 



Drug & Chemical Evaluation Section 

 

 



 

Propofol   

(Diprivan®

 

January 2013 



 

DEA/OD/ODE



Introduction:  

 

Propofol  (2,6-diisopropylphenol,  U.S.  patent  4,447,657)  is  a 



short acting intravenous anaesthetic and marketed (Diprivan®, 

AstraZeneca) as a sterile emulsion.  It is currently available in 

the  United  States  as  a  prescription  medication  for  use  in 

human and veterinary medicine.   

 

Licit Uses:  

 

Propofol is a nonbarbiturate sedative, used in hospital settings 



by  trained  anesthetists  for  the  induction,  maintenance  of 

general anesthesia, and sedation of ventilated adults receiving 

intensive care, for a period of up to 72 hours. 

 

Chemistry:  

 

Propofol, or 2,6-diisopropylphenol (C



12

H

18



O, MW = 178.271) is 

a simple molecule and its chemical structure is shown below.  

  

 

Pharmacology: 



 

Propofol  produces  loss  of  consciousness  rapidly  within  40 

seconds  of  an  intravenous  injection.    Its  duration  of  action  is 

short  with  a  mean  of  3  to  5  minutes  following  a  single  bolus 

dose  of  2  to  2.5  mg/kg  of  body  weight.    Studies  investigating 

the  recovery  profile  of  propofol  have  reported  that  patients 

anaesthetized with propofol wake-

up “elated”, “euphoric”, and 

“talkative”.   

Clinical  studies  indicate  that  50%  of  participating 

subjects  reported  “liking”  on  the  Visual  An

alog  Scale  and 

showed preference for propofol over placebo.  Sub-anesthetic 

doses  of  propofol  are 

reported  to  produce  feelings  of  “

being 


high”, light

-headedness, spaced out and sedation.  Propofol at 

anesthetic doses is reported to cause dream incidence in 20% 

to 60% of the exposed population.   

 

The  primary  effect  of  propofol  is  potentiation  of  GABA-A 



receptors.    Similar  to  barbiturates  and  benzodiazepines, 

propofol  has  been  shown  to  produce  rewarding  and 

reinforcing  effects  in  animals.    Sub-anesthetic  and  anesthetic 

doses  of  propofol  have  been  shown  to  increase  dopamine 

concentrations  in  the  nucleus  accumbens  (brain  reward 

system) in rats.   

 

Propofol  has  a  fast  onset  of  action  and  crosses  the  blood-



brain barrier very quickly. Its short duration of action is due to 

rapid  distribution  from  the  central  nervous  system  to  other 

tissues.    Approximately  70%  of  the  dose  is  excreted  in  the 

urine  within  24  hours  and  90%  is  excreted  within  5  days  of 

administration.  

 

 



Propofol has a narrow window of safety.   Induction of anesthesia 

with  propofol  is  associated  with  cessation  of  breathing  in  some 

adults and children.  Prolonged high dose infusions of propofol for 

sedation  in  adults  and  children  have  been  associated  with 

cessation of breathing, breakdown of heart muscle, and heart and 

kidney  failure  leading  to  death  in  some  cases,  referred  as 

“Propofol  Infusion  Syndrome”

.    Propofol  abuse  may  also  cause 

accumulation  of  fluid  in  the  lungs,  cardio-respiratory  depression 

and  death.    There  is  no  antagonist  or  reversal  medication  for 

propofol toxicity. 

 

Illicit Uses:  

 

Case reports and surveys published in scientific literature indicate 



that  propofol  is  abused  for  recreational  purpose,  mostly  by 

anesthetists,  practitioners,  nurses  and  other  health  care  staff.  

Some  fatalities  occurred  from  propofol  abuse.    A  survey  of 

propofol  abuse  in  academic  anesthesia  programs  revealed  that 

18%  (23  of  126)  of  anesthesiology  departments  in  the  United 

States  experienced  one  or  more  individuals  abusing  propofol  in 

the last 10 years (up to mid-2006) and two departments had more 

than  one  incidence  of  abuse.    The  incidence  of  propofol  abuse 

among all anesthesia personnel was 0.10%.  The mortality among 

anesthesiologists  abusing  propofol  was  28%  (7  deaths  in  25).  

This  survey  also  suggested  that  among  anesthesiology  staff,  the 

incidence  of  propofol  abuse  increased  compared  to  the  previous 

survey reported in 2002. 

 

Propofol  is  rarely  encountered  by  law  enforcement  personnel  or 



submitted  to  forensic  laboratories  for  analysis.    This  may  be,  in 

part,  due  to  its  non-control  status.    According  to  the  National 

Forensic  Laboratory  Information  System  and  the  System  to 

Retrieve Information from Drug Evidence (STRIDE), there were 13 

propofol  reports  from  Federal,  state,  and  local  forensic 

laboratories from January 2010 to June 2012.  Two of these were 

reported in the first six months of 2012. 

 

User Population: 

 

Propofol  is  mostly  abused  by  health  care  staff  including 



anesthetists, practitioners, nurses and technicians. 

 

Control Status: 

 

Propofol is not scheduled under the Controlled Substances Act. 



 

 

Comments  and  additional  information  are  welcomed  by  the  Drug 



and Chemical Evaluation Section, Fax 202-353-1263, Telephone  

202-307-7183, or Email ODE@usdoj.gov. 



Yüklə 22,2 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə