Propolis: chemical composition, biological properties and therapeutic activity



Yüklə 0,68 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/6
tarix18.04.2017
ölçüsü0,68 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6

Propolis: chemical composition, biological properties

and therapeutic activity

Mc Marcucci

To cite this version:

Mc Marcucci. Propolis: chemical composition, biological properties and therapeutic activity.

Apidologie, Springer Verlag, 1995, 26 (2), pp.83-99.

HAL Id: hal-00891249

https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00891249

Submitted on 1 Jan 1995

HAL is a multi-disciplinary open access

archive for the deposit and dissemination of sci-

entific research documents, whether they are pub-

lished or not.

The documents may come from

teaching and research institutions in France or

abroad, or from public or private research centers.

L’archive ouverte pluridisciplinaire HAL, est

destin´


ee au d´

epˆ


ot et `

a la diffusion de documents

scientifiques de niveau recherche, publi´

es ou non,

´

emanant des ´



etablissements d’enseignement et de

recherche fran¸cais ou ´

etrangers, des laboratoires

publics ou priv´

es.


Review article

Propolis: 

chemical 

composition, biological

properties 

and 


therapeutic activity

MC 


Marcucci

Biological 

Chemistry Laboratory, 

Chemical 

Institute of Universidade Estadual de 

Campinas,

CP 6154, 

cep 


13081-970, 

Campinas, 

SP, 

Brazil


(Received 

23 


June 

1994; 


accepted 

30 


November 

1994)


Summary — 

The 


plant 

sources 


and chemical 

composition 

of 

propolis 



are 

reviewed. The chemical

constituents that may 

be relevant to its 

biological 

and 


therapeutic activity 

are 


discussed. 

The 


cyto-

toxic 


activity 

and antimicrobial and 

pharmacological 

properties 

of 

propolis 



are 

presented. Propolis

components, 

which 


cause 

allergy 


and 

are 


responsible 

for anticancer 

activity, 

eg, caffeic acid 

derivatives,

are 


reported. 

The 


therapeutic efficacy 

of 


propolis 

in 


treating 

diseases caused 

by microorganisms 

is

described. Some recent 



concepts 

about 


propolis 

and its 


use 

in medicine 

are 

presented.



propolis 

phenolics 



antimicrobial 

activity 

toxicity 



therapeutical activity

INTRODUCTION

In 


recent 

years there has been renewed

interest 

in 


the 

composition 

of 

propolis, 



a

substance that 

can 

be 


regarded 

as a 


poten-

tial  natural 

source 

in  folk medicine and in



the chemical 

industry. 

This article describes

the 


composition, biological 

and 


pharmaco-

logical  properties, therapeutic activity 

and

uses 


of 

propolis 

in 

pharmaceutical 



and 

cos-


metic 

products.

COMPOSITION OF PROPOLIS

Propolis 

is 



natural resinous substance col-



lected 

by 


bees from 

parts 


of 

plants, 


buds

and exudates 

(Ghisalberti, 1979). 

Bees 


use

it 


as a 

sealer 


for their hives 

(García-Viguera

et al, 

1992) 


and, 

more 


importantly, 

to 


pre-

vent 


the 

decomposition 

of 

creatures 



which

have been killed 

by 

bees after 



an 

invasion of

the 

hive 


(Brumfitt 

et al, 


1990). 

Characteris-

tically, 

it  is 


lipophilic 

material, 

hard and


brittle when cold but 

soft, 


pliable, 

and very


sticky 

when 


warm, 

hence the 

name 

bee-


glue (Hausen 

et al, 


1987a). 

It  possesses 

a

pleasant 



aromatic 

smell, 


and varys in 

color,


depending 

on 


its 

source 


and age 

(Brown,


1989). Among 

the 


types 

of chemical sub-

stances 

found in 

propolis 

are 


waxes, 

resins,


balsams, 

aromatic and ethereal 

oils, 

pollen


and other 

organic 


matter 

(Ghisalberti 

et al,

1978). 


The 

proportion 

of these 

types 


of sub-

stances 


varies and 

depends 


on 

the 


place

and time of collection 

(Ghisalberti 

et 

al,


1978; 

Bankova 


et al, 

1992b). 


The 

com-


pounds 

identified in 

propolis 

resin 


originate

from 3 


sources: 

plant 


exudate 

collected 

by

bees; 


secreted  substances from  bee

metabolism; 

and materials which 

are 


intro-

duced 


during 

propolis 

elaboration 

(Ghis-


alberti, 

1979; 


Marcucci 

et al,  1994b).

Simple 

fractionation of 



propolis 

to 


obtain

compounds 

is 

difficult 



due 

to 


its 

complex


composition. 

The usual 

manner was 

to

extract the 



fraction 

soluble in 

alcohol, 

called


’propolis 

balsam’, 

leaving 

the  alcohol-

insoluble 

or wax 


fraction 

(Ghisalberti, 1979).

Although 

ethanol 


extract 

of 


propolis (EEP) 

is

the 



most common, extracts 

with other sol-

vents 

have been carried 



out 

(Villanueva 

et

al,  1964; 



Cizmárik and 

Matel, 1970; 

Hladón

et al,  1980; 



Bankova 

et al,  1983, 1988, 1989;

Manolova et al, 

1985; Cortani, 

1987, 1991;

Grunberger 

et al,  1988; 

Andrich 


et al,  1987;

Neychev 


et al, 1988; Ross, 

1990) 


for iden-

tification of many constituents. 

Many 

ana-


lytical 

methods have been used 

for 

sepa-


ration  and  identification  of 

propolis


constituents 

(Bankova 

et 

al 1982,  1988,



1989, 1992a, 1994; 

König, 


1986; 

Cortani,


1987; 

Pápay et al, 

1987; 

Grenaway 



et al,

1988, 1989, 1991; 

Walker and 

Crane, 1987;

Nagy 

et al,  1989a, 1989b; 



Campos 

et al,


1990; 

Christov 

and 

Bankova, 1992; 



Tomás-

Barberán 

et al, 

1993 


). 

The known compo-

nents 

of 


propolis 

resin 


are 

listed in table 

I.

Vitamins 



B

1



B

2



B

6



C, 

E, 


and mineral

elements 

silver,  cesium, 

mercury, lan-

thanum, 

antimony, 

copper, 

manganese,

iron, calcium, aluminium, 

vanadium and sil-

icon have all been 

identified 

in 

propolis 



sam-

ples (Deblock-Bostyn, 

1982; 

Debuyser,



1983).

The 


plant origin 

of 


propolis 

has been


studied 

by 


many researchers. Bankova 

et

al 



(1992b) 

showed that 

propolis composi-

tion is very similar 

to 

bud exudates. 



Quali-

tative 


composition 

of many 


compounds, 

eg,


flavonoids 

aglycones 

in 

propolis 



of different

tree 


species 

has indicated that 

propolis 

has


been collected 

from 


Populus 

fremontii

(USA), 





euramericana 

(UK),


Dalechampia 

spp and 


Clusia 

spp 


(Equator)

(Greenaway 

et al, 

1990); P nigra, 



P italica,

P tremula 

(Bulgaria) 

and P suaveolens

(Mongolia) (Bankova 

et al,  1992b; 

1994);

Betula, 


Populus, 

Pinus, Prunus, Acacia,

Aesculus 

hypocastane 

(Hungary) (Nagy 

et

al, 



1985), Clusia minor (Venezuela) (Tomás-

Barberán 

et al, 

1993), 


Plumeria acuminata

and P acutifolia 

(Hawaiian Islands) 

(König,


1985) 

and Betula and Alnus 

(Polish 

regions)


(Warakomska and Maciejewicz, 1992).

BIOLOGICAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL

PROPERTIES

Antibacterial 

activity

The in vitro 

activity 

of 


propolis against 

sev-


eral bacterial strains has been 

reported


(Ghisalberti, 

1979; 


Vanhaelen and Van-

haelen, 1979b; 

Pepeljnjak et al, 

1981, 1982;

Pápay 

et al,  1985b; 



Kawai and 

Konishi,


1987; 

Toth and 

Papay, 

1987; 


Okonenko,

1988; 


Petri 

et al, 


1988; 

Rosenthal 

et al,

1989; 


Brumfitt 

et al,  1990; 

Cuéllar 

et al,


1990; 

Soboleva 

et al, 

1990; 


Dimov 

et al,


1991; 

Dobrowolski 

et al,  1991; 

Kujumgiev

et al,  1993; 

Ventura 


Coll 

et al,  1993; 

Lan-

goni 


et al,  1994; 

Woisky 


et al, 

1994).


Meresta and Meresta 

(1985) 


examined

the 


sensitivity 

of 


75 

bacterial strains 

to

propolis 



extracts. 

Of 


these, 

69 


were 

identi-


fied 

as 


Staphylococcus 

spp and 


Strepto-

coccus 


spp. 

All 


strains exhibited 

high 



sen-

sitivity 

to 

propolis 



extracts. 

The antibacterial

activity 

of 


propolis 

against 


aureus 


209P

had minimum 

inhibitory 

concentration 

(MIC)

and  minimum  bactericidal concentration



(MBC) 

values of 10 and 120 

mg/ml, 

respec-


tively (Meresta 

and 


Meresta, 1980). 

Valdez


Gonzalez 

et al (1985) 

observed that EEP

inhibited the 

growth 

of various bacteria



including 

strains 


of 

Streptococcus 

and Bacil-


lus. 

Grange 


and 

Davey (1990) 

related that

preparations 

of EEP 

(3 mg/ml) completely



inhibited the 

growth 


of Pseudomonas aerug-

inosa and Escherichia 

coli, 

but had 


no 

effect


on 

Klebsiella 

pneumoniae. 

Fuentes and Her-

nandez 

(1990) 


showed that EEP had 

pro-



nounced 

activity against Gram-positive 

bac-

teria, 


including 

aureus, 



coli, 


P

aeruginosa, 

subtilis, 



epidermidis 

and

Streptococcus sp (B hemolytic). 



The results

of Fuentes and Hernandez 

were 

confirmed



by 

Marcucci 

et 

al 


(1994c) 

with the 

same 

E

coli strain.



Besides 

aerobic 


bacteria, 

the anti-

microbial effects of EEP have been tested

against 


total  number 

of 

267 


anaerobic

strains. The 

cultures of bacteria 

generally

showed the 

highest sensitivity 

to 



mg/ml



of EEP (Kedzia, 1986, 1990).

Extracts 

of 

propolis 



have been shown 

to

potentiate 



the 

effect of certain antibiotics

(Ghisalberti, 

1979; 


Kedzia and 

Holderna,

1986; 

Hernandez and 



Bernal, 1990; 

Krol 


et

al, 


1993). 

The antibiotic action 

against 

S

aureus 



(various strains) 

and E coli 

was

increased 



by 

the addition 

of 

propolis 



to 

nutri-


ent 

medium. The presence of 

propolis 

pre-


vented 

or 


reduced any 

gradual build-up 

in

tolerance 



of 

Staphylococci to 

antibiotics

(Ibragimova 

and 

Pankratova, 1983; 



Mer-

esta 


and 

Meresta, 

1985).

The antibacterial 



activity 

of 


propolis 

is

reportedly 



due 

to 


flavonoids and aromatic

acids and 

esters 

present 


in 

resin 


(Debuyser,

1983; 


Meresta and 

Meresta, 

1985/1986).

Galangin, 

pinocembrin 

and 


pinostrobin 

have


been 

recognized 

as 

the 


most 

effective

flavonoid 

agents against 

bacteria 

(Dimov 


et

al, 


1992). 

Ferulic and 

caffeic acid also 

con-


tributes 

to 


bactericidal action 

of 


propolis

(Debuyser, 1983).

Kedzia 

et 


al 

(1990) reported 

that the

mechanism 

of antimicrobial 

activity 

is 

com-


plicated 

and could be attributed 

to 



syner-



gism 

between 


flavonoids, 

hydroxyacids 

and

sesquiterpenes. 



Scheller 

et al (1977b) 

and

Krol 


et 

al 


(1993) 

also 


observed this 

effect .


Antiviral 

activity


There 

are 


few data from studies 

of 


the anti-

viral effects of 

propolis (Esanu 

et al,  1981;

König, 

1986; 


Bankova 

et al, 


1988; 

Neychev


et al,  1988; 

Debiaggi 

et al,  1990; 

Vachy 


et al,

1990; 


Amoros 

et al 1994; 

Serkedjieva 

et al,


1992). 

In 


virological 

studies carried 

out 

with


extracts 

obtained with various 

solvents,

some 


fractions affected the 

reproduction 

of

influenza viruses 



and 


B, 

vaccinia virus

and Newcastle disease virus in 

different 

bio-

logical testing systems 



(Maksimova-Todor-

ova 


et al, 

1985; 


Manolova 

et al, 


1985). 

The


action 

of these active fractions 

was 

similar


both in  strain 

spectrum 

and in  the 

degree


of antiinfluenza 

activity 

of 

propolis 



concen-

trations from 0.2-3.0 

mg/ml.

Amoros 


et al (1992a,  1992b) 

investi-


gated 

the in vitro 

effect of 

propolis 

on 

several


DNA 

and RNA 


viruses, 

including herpes

simplex 

type 


1, 

an 


acyclovir 

resistant 

mutant,

herpes 


simplex type 

2, 


adenovirus 

type 


2,

vesicular stomatitis 

virus and 

poliovirus type

2. 

The inhibition 



of 

poliovirus propagation

was 

clearly 


observed. 

At 


concentration 

of

30 


μg/ml, 

propolis 

reduced the titer of 

herpes


simplex 

virus 


by 

000, 



whereas 

vesicular

stomatitis and adenovirus 

were 


less 

sus-


ceptible. 

In addition 

to 

its effect 



on 

virus mul-

tiplication, propolis 

was 


found 

to exert 

viri-


cidal action 

on 


the 

enveloped 

viruses 

herpes


simplex 

(HSV) 


and vesicular stomatitis virus

(VSV).


Flavonoids and aromatic acid deriva-

tives 


exhibit antiviral 

activity 

(Helbig 

and


Thiel,  1982; 

Ishitsuka 

et al,  1982; Mucsi,

1984; 


Mucsi 

and 


Pragai, 

1985; 


Kaul 

et al,


1985; 

Tsuchiya 

et al,  1985; 

Vanden 


Berghe

et al,  1986; 

Vrijien 

et al,  1988; 

Wleklik 

et al,


1988; 

Serkedjieva 

et al, 

1992; 


Amoros 

et

al, 



1994). König 

and Dustmann 

(1985) 

ver-


ified  that 

luteolin 

was more 

active than

quercetin, 

but 


remarkably 

less than caffeic

acid, 

in the 


inhibition of Amazon 

parrot 


her-

pes virus 

(strain KS144/70) 

at 


range 

con-


centration of 

12.5-200.0 

mg/ml. 

Phenolics



such 

as 


caffeic acid 

were 


found 

to 


have 

a

weak 



activity against 

influenza 

although 

vac-


cinia and adenovirus 

were more 

sensitive

than 


polio 

and 


parainfluenza 

virus 


(Vanden

Berge 


et al, 

1986). Debiaggi et al (1990)

studied 

the effect of 

propolis 

flavonoids 

on

the 


infectivity 

and 


replication 

of 


some 

herpes


virus, adenovirus, 

coronavirus and rotavirus

strains. The 

cytotoxicity 

of 

flavonoids, 



includ-

ing chrysine, kaempferol, 

acacetin, 

galan-


gin 

and 


quercetin 

was 


evaluated.

The antiviral 

activity 

of constituents of

propolis, 

such 


as 

esters 


of substituted cin-

namic 


acids, 

have been studied in vitro. One

of 

them, 


isopentyl 

ferulate, 

significantly 

inhib-


ited the 

infectious 

activity 

of influenza virus

(Hong 


Kong strain) 

at 


50 

mg/ml 


(Serked-

jieva 


et al, 

1992). 


Similar results 

were 


found

by 


Amoros 

et 


al 

(1994) 


when the in  vitro

activity 

of 

3-methylbut-2-enyl 



caffeate iden-

tified in 

propolis samples 

was 


tested 

against


herpes simplex 

virus 


type 

(HSV-1). 



The

same 


synthetic compound 

showed 


strong

inhibition of HSV-1 

growth 

at 


concentration

of 25 

mg/ml. 


Some authors 

suggested 

that

the antiviral 



activity 

of 


propolis 

is due 


to 

both


the main constituents and the minor 

com-


ponents 

like 



Yüklə 0,68 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə