Research article



Yüklə 0,9 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/4
tarix09.02.2017
ölçüsü0,9 Mb.
  1   2   3   4

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Does Facial Amimia Impact the Recognition

of Facial Emotions? An EMG Study in

Parkinson

’s Disease

Soizic Argaud

1,2

*, Sylvain Delplanque



3

, Jean-François Houvenaghel

1,4

, Manon Auffret



1

,

Joan Duprez



1

, Marc Vérin

1,4

, Didier Grandjean



2,3

, Paul Sauleau



1,5

1 Behavior and Basal Ganglia" research unit (EA4712), University of Rennes 1, Rennes, France,



2 Neuroscience of Emotion and Affective Dynamics laboratory, Department of Psychology and Educational

Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland, 3 Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, Campus

Biotech, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland, 4 Department of Neurology, Rennes University

Hospital, Rennes, France, 5 Department of Neurophysiology, Rennes University Hospital, Rennes, France

‡ These authors are joint senior authors on this work.

*

argaud.soizic@gmail.com



Abstract

According to embodied simulation theory, understanding other people

’s emotions is fos-

tered by facial mimicry. However, studies assessing the effect of facial mimicry on the rec-

ognition of emotion are still controversial. In Parkinson

’s disease (PD), one of the most

distinctive clinical features is facial amimia, a reduction in facial expressiveness, but

patients also show emotional disturbances. The present study used the pathological model

of PD to examine the role of facial mimicry on emotion recognition by investigating EMG

responses in PD patients during a facial emotion recognition task (anger, joy, neutral). Our

results evidenced a significant decrease in facial mimicry for joy in PD, essentially linked to

the absence of reaction of the zygomaticus major and the orbicularis oculi muscles in

response to happy avatars, whereas facial mimicry for expressions of anger was relatively

preserved. We also confirmed that PD patients were less accurate in recognizing positive

and neutral facial expressions and highlighted a beneficial effect of facial mimicry on the

recognition of emotion. We thus provide additional arguments for embodied simulation the-

ory suggesting that facial mimicry is a potential lever for therapeutic actions in PD even if it

seems not to be necessarily required in recognizing emotion as such.

Introduction

Facial expression is a powerful non-verbal channel providing rapid essential clues for the per-

ception of other people

’s emotions, intentions and dispositions during social interactions. It

constitutes a key component in daily social communication [

1

,



2

]. The processing of facial

expressions normally contributes to behaviours that are appropriate to the emotion perceived

and the situation and to the person with whom we are communicating. This ensures successful

social interactions [

3

,



4

].

PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0160329



July 28, 2016

1 / 20


a11111

OPEN ACCESS

Citation: Argaud S, Delplanque S, Houvenaghel J-F,

Auffret M, Duprez J, Vérin M, et al. (2016) Does

Facial Amimia Impact the Recognition of Facial

Emotions? An EMG Study in Parkinson

’s Disease.

PLoS ONE 11(7): e0160329. doi:10.1371/journal.

pone.0160329

Editor: Sonja Kotz, Max Planck Institute for Human

Cognitive and Brain Sciences, GERMANY

Received: April 13, 2016

Accepted: July 18, 2016

Published: July 28, 2016

Copyright: © 2016 Argaud et al. This is an open

access article distributed under the terms of the

Creative Commons Attribution License

, which permits

unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any

medium, provided the original author and source are

credited.

Data Availability Statement: All relevant data are

uploaded as Supporting Information files.

Funding: This work was supported by the Belgian

pharmaceutical company UCB Pharma; the national

association of PD patients France Parkinson; and the

National Center of Competence in Research

“Affective Sciences - Emotions in Individual

Behaviour and Social Processes

” (NCCR Affective

Sciences) [51NF40-104897 to DG]. The funders had

no role in study design, data collection and analysis,

decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.


Facial mimicry is defined as the tendency to mimic the facial expressions of individuals with

whom we are interacting, or at least to show congruent valence-related facial responses to the

perceived expression. According to embodied simulation theory, facial mimicry could foster

the understanding of emotion and/or facilitate the inferences and attributions about the mental

states of others during social interactions. In the observer, the mirrored expression is linked to

a central motor command and is thought to induce a tonic muscular change related to a central

proprioceptive feedback; both phenomena are thought to help understand the emotion per-

ceived from the clues displayed by the sender [

5



7



].

In this context, disturbed motor processing can lead to impairments in emotion recognition.

This assumption is supported by experimental studies in which the facial feedback was inhib-

ited or intensified by behavioural (holding a pen between the lips) or pharmacological (facial

botulinum toxin injections) manipulations and by studies among people with facial expression

disorders [

8



11



]. Nevertheless, these studies did not always yield conclusive results. For exam-

ple, Bogart and Matsumoto [

12

] showed that performances among people with Moebius syn-



drome (a congenital condition resulting in facial paralysis) did not differ from those in the

control group on a task assessing emotion recognition. The authors concluded that facial mim-

icry was not necessarily involved in the process of recognizing emotion. However, people with

Moebius syndrome were able to perform as well as healthy people by using compensatory strat-

egies, just as they do with their voices and bodies, to convey emotions [

13

]. Similarly, correla-



tion analyses did not always confirm a relationship between mimicry and emotion recognition

among healthy people [

14



16



].

Parkinson

’s disease (PD) is another pathology affecting facial expression. One of the most

distinctive clinical features of this neurodegenerative disorder is facial amimia: the reduction or

loss of spontaneous facial movements and emotional facial expressions [

17

]. However, PD



affects not only facial expressions but also body motion overall and vocal production. Thus,

unlike Moebius syndrome people, PD patients may be less prone to compensating for their

lack of facial expression by these alternative channels. In addition, PD should not be reduced to

motor symptoms since research has shown that it is clearly also characterised by emotional

dysfunctions. These disorders concern several components of emotion including subjective

feeling, physiological arousal, emotion recognition and motor expression [

18

]. Thus, in the



light of embodied simulation theory, PD patients may

—at least in part—suffer from deficits in

emotion recognition as a result of a reduced ability to mimic facial expressions [

19



21

]. Despite

the fact that PD appears to be a useful model to address this issue, there has been no study on

this topic to date. Such studies would be valuable given that the few investigations assessing the

ability both to express and to recognize facial emotions in PD have evidenced positive correla-

tions between impairments in facial expression and disturbances in emotion recognition

[

22

,



23

].

In this context, the current study was designed to investigate both the recognition of facial



emotion and facial mimicry in PD patients. We expected (1) to confirm the negative impact of

PD in the recognition of emotion as reported in the literature, (2) to highlight a facial mimicry

disturbance among PD patients and (3) to evidence a link between these two deficits.

Materials and Methods

Participants

Forty patients with Parkinson

’s disease (PD) and 40 healthy controls (HC) took part in the

study. All participants provided written informed consents and were informed of the confiden-

tial and anonymous aspect of their involvement in this study which was approved by the ethical

committee on human experimentation of the Rennes University Hospital, France. All clinical

Facial Mimicry in Parkinson's Disease

PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0160329

July 28, 2016

2 / 20


Competing Interests: The authors have the

following interests: This work was supported in part

by the Belgian pharmaceutical company UCB

Pharma. There are no patents, products in

development or marketed products to declare. This

does not alter the authors' adherence to all the PLOS

ONE policies on sharing data and materials.


investigation has been conducted according to the principles expressed in the Declaration of

Helsinki. Each participant underwent a neuropsychological and psychiatric interview in order

to control for any potential bias factors. They were required to obtain a minimum standard

score of 5 on the Matrix Reasoning subtest from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale [

24

] and


to report normal or corrected-to-normal visual acuity. Concerning visuospatial ability, cut-off

scores used for patients inclusion were as follows: 15 on the shape detection screening subtest

from the Visual and Object Space Perception battery (VOSP), 18 on the position discrimina-

tion VOSP subtest and 7 on the number location VOSP subtest [

25

]. Non-emotional face rec-



ognition abilities were checked on the Benton unfamiliar-face matching test [

26

]; cut-off score



for inclusion = 39. No participant had received injections of dermal filling or dermo-contrac-

tion agents in the facial muscles; none reported any history of neurological or psychiatric dis-

ease (except for PD) or drug/alcohol abuse. To ascertain the absence of apathy, a score higher

than -7 on the Lille Apathy Rating Scale (LARS) was required for each patient [

27

]. In addition,



the participants completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI; [

28

]).



Disease severity was rated on the Unified Parkinson

’s Disease Rating Scale motor part

(UPDRS III; [

29

] and the Hoehn and Yahr disability scale [



30

], both under dopamine replace-

ment therapy (ON DRT) and during a temporary withdrawal from treatment (OFF DRT). For

the OFF DRT evaluation, the patients were asked not to take their medication as from the

night before the assessment. A levodopa-equivalent daily dose (LEDD) was calculated for each

patient [

31

]. The patients were on their usual medication during the experiment.



Finally, since caring for someone with PD is associated with socio-emotional distress

[

32



,

33

], caregivers including spouses were not included as HC.



Experimental design

For each trial, a dynamic avatar appeared on a black screen for 2000 ms (

Fig 1

). Then, the par-



ticipants assessed the emotions portrayed and their intensities on seven visual analogue scales

(VAS) labelled joy, sadness, fear, anger, disgust, surprise and neutral. The VAS ranged from 0

to 100%. We used a total of 36 stimuli, presented pseudo-randomly and divided in 3 blocks of

12. In the whole experiment, each participant was exposed to the 36 stimuli with 12 different

avatars portrayed 3 different expressions (anger, joy, neutral). The stimuli consisted in natu-

rally coloured Caucasian avatars (6 women/6 men). For all stimuli, we used FACSGen [

34

,

35



]

to generate videos clips in which the emotional expression unfolded from a neutral state to its

Fig 1. Facial emotion recognition task and stimulus material. Timing (A) and response interface (B) of

the experiment. Example of facial expression display time (C). The emotional expression unfolded from a

neutral state (0) to its emotional peak in 1000 ms (solid line) and stayed at the emotional apex for an

additional 1000 ms (dotted line).

doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0160329.g001

Facial Mimicry in Parkinson's Disease

PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0160329

July 28, 2016

3 / 20


emotional peak in 1000 ms and remained at this level for another 1000 ms. See

S1 Appendix

for a more detailed description of the experimental material.

EMG recordings

Bipolar measures of facial EMG activity were performed using Ag/AgCl electrodes, 3 mm in

diameter, filled with a highly conductive water electrolyte gel (F-E9M SAFELEAD

™ model and

EC60 Signalgel

1

, Grass Technologies). According to the guidelines [



36

], six electrodes were

positioned over the left zygomaticus (zygomaticus major), orbicularis (orbicularis oculi) and

corrugator (corrugator supercilii) muscle regions and one reference electrode (15x20 mm,

Ambu

1

Neuroline 700) was attached to the forehead. In order to avoid any potential partici-



pant bias, we recorded facial muscle activity in participants being not aware that this was the

real purpose of the electrodes. The use of facial electrodes was explained by the need for record-

ing sweat gland activity. The only instruction given to the participants was to assess the emotion

portrayed by the avatar using the VAS. No reference to muscle activity or facial movements was

given at any time of the experiment. To further confirm that the participants were not aware of

the objective of the study, we interviewed them after the experiment. None of the participants

reported that they had figured out our purpose or that they had focused on facial movements.

The EMG raw signal was recorded with a g.BSamp biosignal amplifier (g.tec), digitized using a

16-bit analog-to-digital converter and stored with a sampling frequency of 1000 Hz. Offline, it

was filtered with a 40

–200 Hz band pass filter, rectified and smoothed with a sliding average

(window size = 200 ms). PowerLab 16/35 hardware and LabChart

1

Pro Software version 7.3.7



(ADInstrument) were used for EMG data acquisition. After a visual examination of the EMG

signals recorded from one second before stimulus onset to stimulus offset, trials in which the

EMG amplitude exceeded 30

μV were removed in order to reject any remaining artefacts

(3.04% of trials deleted).

Data analysis

Five trials out of 2880 were excluded from the analyses because no response was recorded on

the VAS.


Facial emotion recognition.

First, the performances on the emotion recognition task

were exploited in terms of emotion decoding accuracy. An expression was considered as accu-

rately identified when the emotion receiving the highest intensity rating on the VAS corre-

sponded to the emotion displayed (target emotion). The accurately identified expressions were

coded as 1; misidentified expressions were coded as 0. Then, in order to determine the nature

of the confounding emotions in case of misidentified expressions, confusion percentage was

calculated for each non-target emotion; emotions that did not corresponded to the relevant

stimulus (number of times each non-target emotion received the highest intensity rating on the

VAS instead of the target emotion on the total number of trials).

Facial EMG responses.

For each trial, the second before stimulus onset was considered as

baseline. To examine the temporal profiles of facial reactions, the EMG amplitudes were aver-

aged across the sequential 100 ms intervals of stimulus exposure and expressed as a relative

percentage of the mean amplitude for baseline. As we expected to highlight a dynamic pattern

of facial reactions to emotions as already reported in the literature, facial EMG responses were

calculated as previously but on sequential 500 ms periods of stimulus exposure (0

–500; 500–

1000; 1000

–1500 and 1500–2000 ms) to examine the effect of the patients’ clinical characteris-

tics as well as to assess the relationship between emotion recognition and facial responses (see

S1 Fig


).

Facial Mimicry in Parkinson's Disease

PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0160329

July 28, 2016

4 / 20


Statistical analysis

Data management and statistical analyses were performed using R 3.2.0 [

37

]. The significance



threshold was set at

α = 0.05 except when it was adjusted for multiple comparisons.

The experimental fixed effects on decoding accuracy (group and emotion) and on EMG

responses (group, emotion, muscle and interval) were tested by fitting logistic and linear mixed

models respectively, with random intercepts for both participants and avatars (

“glmer” and

“lmer” functions in the “lme4” package, (g)lmer{lme4}; [

38

]). In order to control for bias fac-



tors, the sociodemographic and neuropsychological variables, as well as their interaction effects

with the group factor, were added to these models as fixed factors. Then, analyses of variance

(type II Wald Chi-square tests, Anova{car}) were computed and only the potential bias factors

with significant effects were retained in the models in order to increase their statistical power.

In the case of significant effects, contrasts were tested (testInteractions{phia}) using the Bonfer-

roni adjustment method for p values [

39

,

40



]. The fixed effects of group and non-target emotion

on confusion percentage were tested similarly by fitting linear mixed models with random

intercepts for participants for each level of emotion factor. In order to test whether muscles

exhibited higher activity at baseline in the PD patients, analysis of variance was computed on

mean EMG amplitudes measured at baseline with group, muscle and emotion as fixed factors

and random intercepts for both participants and avatars. As previously, contrasts were tested

using the Bonferroni adjustment method for p values in case of significant effects. The impact

of medication and other clinical characteristics such as disease severity on decoding accuracy

and EMG responses was tested by computing analyses of variance for fitted logistic and linear

mixed models with disease duration, the worst affected side, LEDD, Hoehn and Yahr stages

and UPDRS III scores (ON and OFF DRT) as fixed factors in addition to the experimental fac-

tors (emotion and muscle). For the effects of these clinical characteristics on EMG responses,

analyses were conducted on the standardized EMG responses calculated across sequential 500

ms periods of stimulus exposure for each level of muscle, emotion and period factors. Finally,

to examine the relationship between emotion recognition and facial mimicry, the fixed effects

of the group, the standardized EMG responses of the three recorded muscles calculated on

sequential 500 ms periods and their interaction with the group on decoding accuracy were

tested by computing analyses of variance for logistic mixed models fitted for each level of emo-

tion and period factors.

Results


Characteristics of the groups and confounding factors

The group characteristics are shown in

Table 1

. For details about the patients



’ medication,

refer to


S1 Table

. All the sociodemographic and neuropsychological factors involving potential

bias (age, gender, state and trait anxiety levels, scores on the Matrix and on the Benton tests)

were added to the statistical models fitted to assess the effects of experimental factors on decod-

ing accuracy and on EMG responses. Only a negative impact of age on decoding accuracy was

significant (

χ² = 8.87, df = 1, p = 0.003).

Facial emotion decoding accuracy

Decoding accuracy varied across experimental conditions (

Fig 2


). The decoding accuracy

scores of the PD patients were overall significantly lower than those of the HC (

χ² = 13.34,

df = 1, p



<0.001). A significant group x emotion interaction effect (χ² = 21.05, df = 2, p<0.001)

showed that the difference between groups was interacting with the emotion factor. The decod-

ing accuracy scores of the PD patients were significantly lower than those of the HC for happy

Facial Mimicry in Parkinson's Disease

PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0160329

July 28, 2016

5 / 20


(

χ² = 7.07, df = 1, p = 0.024) and neutral avatars (χ² = 14.28, df = 1, p<0.001) but not for angry

faces (

χ² = 0.2, df = 1, p = 0.99). In the PD patients, performances tended to increase with the



LEDD (

χ² = 2.74, df = 1, p = 0.098). No effect was found for disease duration or severity mea-

sured by the Hoehn and Yahr stages or the UPDRS III scores (ON and OFF DRT; all p

>0.1).


Table 1. Characteristics of the groups with mean

± standard deviation [range] and statistics.

N

Healthy controls



PD patients

(df) F


p value

ON DRT


OFF DRT

Gender (F/M)

40/40

20/20


20/20

-

-



-

Age (years)

40/40

62.2


± 7.8 [43; 75]

61.2


± 9.6 [42; 79]

-

(1



,78) 0.29

0.59


State anxiety [20; 80]

40/38


27.7

± 7.3 [20; 48]

31.4

± 6.6 [20; 47]



-

(1

,76) 5.61



0.02

Trait anxiety [20; 80]


Yüklə 0,9 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə