Town of carlisle for the year ending


Discovery: Community learning co-op. The people of Carlisle will be supported in their learning throughout life. Equality



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Discovery: Community learning co-op. The people of Carlisle will be supported in their learning throughout life.
Equality: Welcome to Your place. The people of Carlisle define what the Library is and we provide the access.
Loyalty: Carlisle’s Atlas. Carlisle’s history has a home at the Library.
Civility: Come Together. The people of Carlisle find opportunity for social engagement, volunteerism, and community building at the Library.
Literacy: A Love of the Word. The word, in its many media, is celebrated and available.
Positive Interactions: Empower People. The people of Carlisle will be welcomed and put first.
Trust: Effective Management. The people of Carlisle will see an open and trustworthy organization.
This report was prepared by Angela Mollet, Library Director.
GLEASON PUBLIC LIBRARY STATISTICS

Hours open per week 56 January – April 53 May – December


Number of items 72,704 (digital and in library)
Number of holds picked up 15,491
Number of items shared to other libraries 23,939
Number of Carlisle patrons 4,228
Circulation 123,287
Circulation of digital items 1,951
Circulation and Holdings data is based on FY as reported in state reporting data.
Calendar 2011/Fine money of $5,826.77 was paid to the Town Treasurer.
Trustees:

Larissa Shyjan, Chair Term Expires 2012


Priscilla Stevens, Treasurer Term Expires 2013
Steve Golson, Secretary Term Expires 2014

CULTURAL COUNCIL
The Carlisle Cultural Council awarded $4370.00 to thirteen applicants for the 2012 year.
The awards are as follows:

Anne Marie Brako, to create a song for Carlisle Old Home Day 2012 $500

Carlisle Community Chorus, for Public Concerts $400

Richard Clark, to perform “Clarence Darrow” by David Rintels $350

Ed Cope, for Reading is Magic $300

Marilyn Cugini, for Discussing Creativity, a Local television program $300

Greg Curtis, for COA performance of “Songs to Inspire” $400

Wendy Frank, musical enrichment for special needs children $400

Gleason Public Library, for The Pumpernickel Puppet Show $250

Gleason Public Library, for a Bat Talk by Dr Tom Kuntz $250

Lisa Lofdahl, for Blue Skies Trio COA Concert $400

John Root, performance of “Popular Music of the Gaslight Era” $320

Sunanda Sahay for the Celebrate India Day in Acton $250

The Discovery Museum, “Especially for Me Program” $250


In addition to awarding grants, the council sponsored a Sunday-afternoon-at-the-Movies, at Gleason Library in March 2011.
Members

Patricia Koenitzer, ex-officio member/Chair

Kathy Coughlin-Horvath, Treasurer

Roslyn Pullman, Secretary

Lura Taylor

Susan Bacher



Abigail Carr


CARLISLE PUBLIC SCHOOLS
The citizens of Carlisle are justifiably proud of the Carlisle Public School District and its accomplishments, and the School Committee and Superintendent are pleased to present this report on our 2011 activities. The year might be dubbed the year of construction, as our building project finally began after years of planning. In spite of the inevitable upheaval caused by a major construction project in the middle of campus, teachers and students went about the business of education in their typical outstanding fashion, resulting in many successes and achievements.
Each year the Superintendent and School Committee jointly establish a set of District Goals, which serves as a guide for the year. In addition, the School Committee develops goals to meet as a committee, and these two sets of goals serve as a framework for the year’s achievements. A main goal for both the Superintendent and School Committee for 2011 was to support the building project and ensure a safe environment for students and staff throughout the project. This required an extensive planning process that began early in 2011 and was still underway as the year closed. The plans developed initially concerned the relocation of the buses and the establishment of new, temporary routes across campus. Staff and students both rose to the challenges presented by the fragmented campus and followed the new routes around the back of the school to the Corey Building for lunch, music and physical education. Teachers willingly took extra time to make sure that our youngest students felt safe and comfortable with their new routines, and our middle school students made room in their crowded hallways for the elementary children. As the year drew to a close, discussions began about the next phase of the building project when students move to new classrooms, the buses move back to the lower lot, and the campus configuration changes again as the old Spalding Building is fenced off and eventually removed. We are very grateful for the cooperative spirit shown by all in working around the building project, and we are confident that the end result will be well worth the inconveniences.
While the project consumed much administrative attention and many resources, it was business as usual for the day-to-day education of our students. During the winter, several classes produced class plays, including Kindergarten with the much-loved annual Mitten Play. The seventh grade performances of Bye Bye Birdie featured a pit orchestra for the first time, and all who attended enjoyed watching our seventh graders sing and dance in a very professional production. In another special event, Senegalese dancers first entertained middle school students and then gave special dance lessons to the fifth grade classes. In second grade, the annual Iditarod unit introduced students to dog sledding through a visit by a musher. The students used math, writing, and geography skills to follow the Iditarod race over several days, culminating in a festival in which they shared what they had learned with parents and friends. Third graders celebrated winter with an array of craft activities, and the fourth grade classes visited the Harvard Museum of Natural History in conjunction with special science lessons. The music department prepared for the spring MICCA festival with extra rehearsals, and the varsity and junior varsity basketball teams had successful seasons. This year Carlisle eighth grade students were selected to participate in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) tests in which reading and math skills were tested. Although students do not receive individual scores in this test, our student scores contributed to the high ranking that Massachusetts received in comparison with other states.
While students were involved in learning activities inside and outside the classrooms, there were also several opportunities for teachers and parents. In early March the school hosted a showing of the documentary, Race to Nowhere, sponsored by the CSA. The film gave families an in-depth look at the pressures on children, particularly in middle and high school and led to lively discussions about ways to balance schoolwork with other activities for stressed children. Teachers focused on writing during professional development time, and Lester Laminack, nationally known writing consultant, continued his work with teachers around the writing process. A new phonics curriculum was introduced in the elementary grades, and grammar units were updated for middle school students. The CSA hosted a parent informational coffee on bullying, in which the superintendent described what is being done to make the school a safe place for all, free from bullying.
As winter gave way slowly to spring, the planned for construction changes began to appear on campus as offices moved and the fence surrounding the plaza went up. Students watched with nostalgia, as a huge hole appeared where their much-loved plaza had been. On May 3rd staff and administration along with state and local officials took part in a groundbreaking ceremony. Spring always heralds the start of MCAS testing, and this year English reading and writing tests were held in March, followed by math and science in May. Our students’ MCAS scores were very high as we continue to be among the highest achieving districts in the Commonwealth. The third grades took a field trip to Plimoth Plantation to complete their history unit on the pilgrims and early America. Kindergartners participated in the last Rainforest Play, as the kindergarten play in 2012 will more closely follow the kindergarten curriculum. Meetings and screenings were held to prepare next year’s kindergarten students and parents for their entry into the school. Our music students had a very successful spring with gold medals for both the band and choir in the MICCA festival. Several students also won medals in individual band and choir events throughout April and May. For the first time in many years, there was no anxiety around the weather forecast for the eighth grade graduation ceremony. Because of the construction, graduation was held in the auditorium as we said farewell to 73 eighth graders, many of whom have been a part of the school for nine years. One of the most anticipated events surrounding graduation is the Writing Treasury Ceremony. On a morning in early June, parents and eighth grade students gathered in the cafeteria to share a look at the students’ writing portfolios, collected over the years the students have been in Carlisle. It is always wonderful to see their writing progress from mostly picture stories in kindergarten and first grade to the sophisticated work produced in the middle school.
Summer is usually a quieter time on the school campus, but there is much activity behind the scenes. At the end of June in 2011, office staff moved across campus to the old Spalding Building to make way for extensive renovations in Wilkins. School administrators attended many workshops and professional meetings, and teachers often visited campus to work together to prepare for the coming school year, with projects in all disciplines. At times, with the amount and pace of the construction work, it seemed that school would never be able to open on time, but when staff returned on August 31st, all was ready for both students and staff.
In the fall, we welcomed Tara Callahan, as our choral music teacher, replacing Megan Harlow, who moved on to a new position. At the opening meeting, 3rd grade teacher Gene Stamell was recognized as this year’s “school sage,” in honor of his upcoming retirement at the end of the 11 – 12 school year. Right after Labor Day, we greeted 655 eager students. The middle school students and staff took pleasure in their newly renovated spaces, sparkling clean and painted in bright colors. Shortly after school started, parents’ nights were held where parents learned about the curriculum for their children’s classes. Staff enjoyed a traditional “welcome back” lunch put on by the CSA. The sixth grade spaghetti supper was a great success, attended by both school families and Carlisle citizens. Murals with scenes of Italy covered the boarded up windows, and the atmosphere was that of an Italian café. The fall marked the second full year of the Carlisle School Gardening and Compost Project, Carlisle Goes Green. Herbs were harvested from the gardens for use in the cafeteria, and full scale composting began during all lunch periods. Students received training from adult project volunteers, and lunchtime cafeteria waste as well as waste from the Spaghetti Supper was added to the compost bins. Andrew Chen, an expert in teaching math spoke to teachers during an early release professional day. In October, teachers visited other schools as part of their professional development activities for the year, and at the end of October, we were pleased to be able to offer shelter and showers to residents without power after the snowstorm. The holidays arrived with the usual Thanksgiving activities and plays, including the final performances of Gene Stamell’s Thanksgiving Play, a tradition that will be greatly missed in years to come. The music department shared the talents of their musicians through holiday concerts, and the soccer, field hockey, and cross-country teams celebrated their seasons at end of the year parties.
Throughout the year, the School Committee is key to the smooth running of the Carlisle School, as they ensure that there is sufficient funding to run the programs that make our school excellent. They also develop and approve the policies that guide the school’s daily activities, approve the District Goals, and provide the bridge between the school and other town committees and officials. Members spend time at meetings discussing and debating the budget, working on policies, and hearing presentations on the educational activities happening at school. In addition to the School Committee, parents and townspeople are unfailing in their support of our school, both as individuals and through our parent organizations, the Carlisle School Association (CSA), and the Carlisle Education Foundation (CEF). They fund special events, teacher grants, and large projects like the sixth grade iPad pilot, which was in the planning stages at the end of the year. The Carlisle Public School is truly a partnership among our students, staff, and all the individuals who freely give their time and resources to make our school great. We offer our thanks to all for your continued and unflagging support.
Members

Joyce Mehaffey, Ph.D., Superintendent/Principal

William Fink, Chair

Joshua Kablotsky Chad Koski

Louis Salemy Mary Storrs

CARLISLE SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE
In 2011, the focus of the Carlisle School Building Committee (SBC) turned to overseeing construction of the school building project as the project moved from the design phase into construction.

The filed sub-bids for the construction project were received in January and the general contractor bids were received in early February. The low general bidder on the project was H.V. Collins of Providence, RI with a bid amount of $14,889,000. In March, the contractor mobilized to the site and initiated construction. In May, the SBC hosted a groundbreaking ceremony for the project, which was attended by CPS staff, students, local officials, as well as Katherine Craven, Executive Director of the Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA).

As the project moved to the construction phase, a Change Order Subcommittee was formed to evaluate requested change orders for the project and make recommendations to the SBC regarding the merit and fair value of the requested changes. In addition, a Color Design Subcommittee was also formed to review the color schemes proposed by the Architect for the exterior metal panels and various interior building finishes.

Over the summer, construction proceeded on the foundation and structural steel erection for the new building. In addition, we began site work including the installation of buried utilities and installation of the new fire cisterns as well as renovation of the interior of the existing Wilkins building. Some of the existing building roofs were also replaced, including the sloped roof section of the Corey Building and portions of the Robbins building roof.

With the return of students for the start of the 2011-2012 school year, the focus of construction activity turned to the construction of the new building. Work included installation of floor slabs, steel framing and interior light gauge framing, exterior building sheeting and vapor barrier, rough in of plumbing, electrical and HVAC, as well as site work in the immediate vicinity of the new building.

Throughout the project, the Committee has been working on the review of project invoices, addressing construction issues requiring owner input, and considering whether proposed revisions to the project are consistent with the project scope. The SBC has also overseen the procurement of telephone, technology equipment, and furniture associated with the project.

As of the end of the year the interior of the new building had been protected from the weather and temporarily heated. Most of the exterior masonry had been completed. The rough-in of HVAC, plumbing, and electrical was substantially complete, and installation of sheet rock on the interior walls had begun. Move-in to the new building is currently scheduled for the spring of 2012. The project is approximately 51% complete with $7,774,346 in construction completed as of the end of the year.

The SBC anticipates working closely with the School to coordinate for the transition of students into the new building, the subsequent demolition of the existing Spalding building, and the remaining renovations of existing spaces and site improvements throughout 2012.



Members

Lee Storrs, Chair

Larry Barton

Janne Corneil

Bill Fink

David Flannery

Tim Goddard

Joyce Mehaffey

Bob Pauplis

Bill Risso

Douglas Stevenson

Ingo Szegvari

Linda Vanaria

Robert Wiggins



Carlisle Public Schools

Enrollment by Grade

December 31, 2011


Grade Boys Girls Total
Pre-Kindergarten 10 4 14

Kindergarten 26 27 53

Grade 1 20 28 48

Grade 2 36 32 68

Grade 3 37 29 66

Grade 4 31 40 71

Grade 5 40 35 75

Grade 6 35 36 71

Grade 7 44 50 94

Grade 8 42 41 83

Out of District 8 4 12

or Services Only



Total 329 326 655

Carlisle Public Schools

Administration and Faculty List
Years of Service 2011 – 2012



Name

Education

Position

Began

Service













Barbara Arnold

Smith College, B.A.

Wheelock College, M.Ed



Kindergarten

2004













Nicole Baker

University of Massachusetts, B.A.

Cambridge College, M.A



French/Spanish

1992













Joan Beauchamp

Fitchburg State College, B.S.

Simmons College, M.S.



Special Educator

2002













Susan Bober

Framingham State, B.S.

Lesley College, M.Ed.



Reading Specialist

1996













Bethany Boglarski

Fitchburg State, B.A.

Simmons College, M.S.



Special Educator

2003













Susan Brinner

Kalamazoo College, B.A.

Lesley College, M.Ed.



Mathematics

1991













Tara Callahan

Florida State University, B.A.

Music

2011













Lynne Carmel

Castleton State College, B.S.

Cambridge College, M.Ed.



Physical Education

1999













Amy Caron

Boston College, B.A.

Fitchburg State College, M.Ed.



Grade 2

2003













Miriam Chandler

University of New Hampshire, B.S.

Lesley College, M.Ed.



Kindergarten

1999













Leanne Christmas

Syracuse University, B.S., M.S.

Speech & Language

2001













Donna Clapp

Salem State College, B.A.

Rivier College, M.Ed.



Second Grade

1993













April Colson

Quinnipiac College, B.S.

Florida International, M.S



Occupational Therapist

2005













Patricia Comeau

Marist College, B.A.

S.U.N.Y., Binghamton, M.S.



Special Educator

1991













Bradford Cranston

Bates College, B.A.

Johns Hopkins, M.A.



Science

2006













Peter Darasz

Central Connecticut State, B.S.

Eastern Connecticut State, M.S.



Grade 2

1994













Christine Denaro

Bentley College, B.S.

Lesley College, M.Ed.



Grade 3

2004













David Flannery

Middlesex Community College

Supervisor, Buildings & Grounds

1975













William Gale, Jr.

Springfield College, B.S.

Lesley College, M. Ed.



Mathematics

1997













Vanessa Gerade

University Of Massachusetts, B.A.

Lesley University, M.A.



Grade 1

2004













Mimi Gleason

Middlebury College, B.A.

Harvard University, M.Ed.



Grade 5

2008













Cassandra Graham

St. Lawrence University, M.S.

Boston College, M.Ed.



Grade 1

2000













Elizabeth Gray

Boston University, B.S.

Penn State University, M.Ed.



Grade 3

1998













Elizabeth Hamlet

Univ. of New Hampshire, B.A.

Emerson College, M.S



Speech & Language

2000













Michaela Hardimon

Middlebury College, B.A.

Antioch New England, M.Ed.



Early Childhood

1998













Kristy Hartono

Lesley University, B.S.

Eastern Nazarene, M.Ed.



English Language Learner

2010













Cheryl Hay

University of Massachusetts, B.S.

Fitchburg State, M.Ed.



Grade 7

2006














Margaret Heigl

University of Massachusetts, B.S.

Cambridge College, M.A.



Physical Education

1993













Kathleen Horan, RN

Lowell State College, B.S.N.

Cambridge College, M.Ed.



School Nurse

1993













Shawna Horgan

Westfield State College, B.S.

Fitchburg State College, M.Ed.



Grade 1

1999













Chiao Bin Huang

Chinese Cultural University, B.A.

Emerson College, M.A.



Chinese

2005













Daniel Hunt

Bridgewater State College, B.A.

Physical Education

2006













Patrice Hurley

University of Massachusetts, B.S.

Lesley University M.Ed.



Principal

2006













Lori Jackson

Northeastern University, B.A.

Northeastern University, M.S.



School Psychologist

2007













Kendra Katz

Eastern Nazarene, B.A.

Mid-America Nazarene M.Ed.



Grade 5

2006













Sandra Kelly

Framingham State College, B.S.

Fitchburg State College, M.Ed.



Library/Media Specialist

1999













Emily King

Boston University, B.S.

Lesley College, M.Ed.



Grade 5

2004













Rachel Levy

Institute of Art, B.A.

State University of NY, M.A.



Art

2005













Courtney Longaker

University of Massachusetts, B.A.

Simmons College, M.S.



Art

1997













Kevin Maier

Manhattanville College, B.A., M.Ed.

Music

2009













Tracy Malone

Assumption College, B.A.

Framingham State College, M.Ed.



Special Educator

2003













Kathryn Marsh

University of Wisconsin, B.S.

University of California, Ph.D.



Science

2004













Caryl McCabe

University of Massachusetts, B.A.

Rivier College, M.Ed.



Grade 2

2008













Cynthia McCann

University of Maryland, B.S.

Lesley University, M.Ed.



Technology

2003













Lianne McCann

Worcester State, B.A., M.S

Queen Margaret University, Ph.D.



Speech Pathologist

2010













Constance McGrath

Boston State, B.S.

Lesley University, M.Ed.



Special Educator

2007













Joyce Mehaffey

Rider College, B.A.

Trenton State, M.A.T.

UMass, M.Ed. & Ph.D.


Superintendent/ Principal

2008













Michael Miller

Bowdoin College, B.A.

Boston University, M.A.T.



Social Studies

1994













Angela Monke

Univ. of Massachusetts, B.A, M.A.

Music

1998













Cynthia Morris

Stonehill College, B.A.

Lesley University, M.Ed.



Grade 3

2000













Jason Naroff

Boston University, B.S.

Lesley University, M.Ed.



Grade 4

2008













Aria Niemierko

UMass, B.A, M.Ed.

Grade 3

2010













Steven Peck

Xavier University, B.A.

Boston College, M.Ed.



Special Educator

2004













Elizabeth Perry

Brandeis University, B.A.

Potsdam State University, M.S.



Grade 5

1983













Michele Petteruti

Brown University B.A.

Tufts, M.A.



Psychologist

2010













Marcella Pixley

Vassar College, A.B.

University of Tennessee, M.A.



Language Arts

2004













Jennifer Pray

Bridgewater State, B.S.

Bridgewater State, M. Ed.



Special Educator

2007













Susan Pray

Framingham State, B.S.

Business Manager

1991













Jennifer Putnam

Mount Holyoke College, A.B.

Simmons College, M.A.



Grade 5

1995













Hubertus Quaden

Katholieke Pedagogische, B.A.

Lesley College, M.Ed.



Mathematics

1981













Kimberly Reid

State University of New York, B.A.

Northeastern University, M.Ed.



School Psychologist

1995













Erin Rooney

Assumption College, B.A.

Simmons College, M.S.



Social Studies

2003













Susan Ross

Ohio State University, B.S.

University of Southern Cal., M.A



Occupational

Therapist



1998













Jennifer Rowland

Stonehill College, B.S.

Simmons College, M.Ed.



Special Educator

1999













Kathleen Rupprecht

Miami University, B.A.

Northeastern, M.S.



School Psychologist

2009













Cynthia Samuels

Colorado State University, B.S.

Emerson College, M.S.



Special Educator

1995













Suzanne Severy

University of Massachusetts, B.A.

Lesley College, M.Ed.



Kindergarten

2000













Karen Slack

Cedarcrest College, B.A.

Keene State College, M.Ed.



Student Services Dir./Principal

2006













Wendy Stack

Muhlenberg College, B.S.

Lesley College, M. Ed.

Univ. of New Hampshire, M.S.


Science

1997













Gene Stamell

Trinity College, B.A.

Tufts University, M.Ed.



Grade 3

1980













Alisa Steel

Bridgewater State, B.S.

Framingham State, M.Ed.



Mathematics Specialist

2010













Andrea Steffek

University of Colorado, B.A.

Tufts University, M.A.T.



Spanish

2001













Linda Vanaria

Lesley University, B.A., M.Ed.

Grade 1

2007













Heather White

Northwestern University, B.A.

Syracuse University, M.S.



Speech & Language

1999













Claire Wilcox

Connecticut College, B.A.

Assistant to the Superintendent

2005













David Zuckerman

Occidental College, B.A.

Tufts University, M.A.T.



Social Studies

1999


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