Musk Thistle Interesting Facts



Yüklə 9.1 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix28.01.2017
ölçüsü9.1 Kb.

Musk Thistle 

Interesting Facts 

 



A single flower head may produce 1,200 seeds and a single plant up to 120,000 seeds 

 



Seed may remain viable in the soil for over ten years  

 



Unpalatable to wildlife and livestock  

 



Can grow to 6 feet 

 

Description 

Musk thistle is a non-native biennial forb that reproduces solely by seed.   

Stems are upright, green-grayish, and can grow to 6 feet tall with spiny wings . 

Leaves The leaves are spiny, waxy, and dark green in color with a light green midrib. 

Flowers are purple, large in size (1.5 to 3 inches in diameter), nodding, and terminal. 

Seed/Fruit can produce thousands of straw-colored seeds adorned with plume-like bristles. 

 

Habitat 

Musk thistle grows from sea level to about 8,000 ft elevation, in neutral to acidic soils.  It invades open 

natural areas such as meadows, prairies, and grassy balds.  It spreads rapidly in areas subjected to 

frequent natural disturbance events such as landslides and flooding but does not grow well in 

excessively wet, dry or shady conditions. 

 

Ecological Impacts 

Because musk thistle is unpalatable to wildlife and livestock, selective grazing leads to severe 

degradation of native meadows and grasslands as wildlife focus their foraging on native plants, giving 

musk thistle a competitive advantage 

 

Control  

Mechanical:  Musk thistle will not tolerate tillage and can be removed easily by severing its root below 

ground with a shovel or hoe. Mowing can effectively reduce seed output if plants are cut when the 

terminal head is in the late-flowering stage. Gather and burn mowed debris to destroy any seed that has 

developed.  



Chemical:  Apply herbicides such as Picloram, Aminopyralid, Dicamba, or 2,4-D to musk thistle rosettes 

in spring or fall. Apply chlorsulfuron up to the early flower growth stage. 



Biological:  Two weevils have been introduced from Europe and released in the United States as a 

biological control for musk thistle, the thistlehead-feeding weevil (Rhinocyllus conicus) and the rosette 

weevil (Trichosirocalus horridus).  These weevils have been released in a number of western states with 

some notable successes achieved.  However, recent observations of unintentional and unanticipated 

impacts of the thistlehead-feeding weevil to native thistles, including some rare species, has raised a 

concern about its continued use, at least in the western U.S. 




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə