On the properties of equally-weighted risk contributions portfolios



Yüklə 273.64 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/3
tarix28.11.2016
ölçüsü273.64 Kb.
1   2   3

Return


Volatility

Correlation matrix(%)

SPX

6.8%


19.7%

100


85

45.5


42.4

3.5


58.5

25

16



-10.8

-18.7


19.8

27.3


7.2

RTY


6.5%

22%


100

42.1


38

4.2


54.6

26.3


18.6

-11.4


-20.9

18.7


22.7

7.8


EUR

7.9%


23.3%

100


83.2

21.6


52.2

53.5


36.2

14.8


-16

33.6


28

16.3


GBP

5.5%


20.7%

100


21.1

52.4


52.4

37.1


12.3

-15.1


35.4

27.8


20.3

JPY


−2.5%

23.8%


100

14.4


28.4

49.5


15.3

-2.2


19.8

11.8


10.2

MSCI-LA


9.5%

29.8%


100

45.1


33.2

-1.4


-15

29.2


59.1

19.4


MSCI-EME

8.6%


29.2%

100


46.6

12

-13.3



34.5

29.4


18.5

ASIA


0.9%

22.2%


100

-2

-10.2



31.6

21.2


11.8

EUR-BND


7.9%

10.1%


100

29.6


4.8

5.3


9.1

USD-BND


7.4%

4.9%


100

8.6


12.3

-6.1


USD-HY

4.7%


4.3%

100


32.6

11.8


EMBI

11.6%


11%

100


9.3

GSCI


4.3%

22.4%


100

Names (codes) of the asset classes are as follows: S&P 500 (SPX), Russell 2000 (RTY), DJ Euro

Stoxx 50 (EUR), FTSE 100 (GBP), Topix (JPY), MSCI Latin America (MSCI-LA), MSCI Emerging

Markets Europe (MSCI-EME), MSCI AC Asia ex Japan (ASIA), JP Morgan Global Govt Bond Euro

(EUR-BND), JP Morgan Govt Bond US (USD-BND), ML US High Yield Master II (USD-HY), JP

Morgan EMBI Diversied (EM-BND), S&P GSCI (GSCI).

Results of the historical backtests are summarized in Table 6 and cumulative

performances represented in gure 2. The hierarchy in terms of average returns,

risk statistics, concentration and turnover statistics is very clear. The ERC portfolio

performs best based on Sharpe ratios and average returns. In terms of Sharpe ratios,

the 1/n portfolio is largely dominated

7

by MV and ERC. The dierence between



those last two portfolios is a balance between risk and concentration of portfolios.

Notice that for the ERC portfolio, turnover and concentration statistics are here

superior to the ones of the previous example, which corroborates the intuition that

these statistics are increasing functions of heterogeneity in volatilities and correlation

coecients.

5 Conclusion

A perceived lack of robustness or discomfort with empirical results have led investors

to become increasingly skeptical of traditional asset allocation methodologies that

incorporate expected returns. In this perspective, emphasis has been put on mini-

mum variance (i.e. the unique mean-variance ecient portfolio independent of return

expectations) and equally-weighted (1/n) portfolios. Despite their robustness, both

approaches have their own limitations; a lack of risk monitoring for 1/n portfolios

and dramatic asset concentration for minimum variance ones.

7

The dramatic drawdown of the 1/n portfolio in 2008 explains to a large extent this result.



16

Table 6: Statistics of the three strategies, global diversied portfolio

1/n


mv

erc


Return

7.17%


5.84%

7.58%


Volatility

10.87%


3.20%

4.92%


Sharpe

0.27


0.49

0.67


VaR 1D 1%

−1.93%


−0.56%

−0.85%


VaR 1W 1%

−5.17%


−2.24%

−2.28%


VaR 1M 1% −11.32%

−4.25%


−5.20%

DD 1D


−5.64%

−2.86%


−2.50%

DD 1W


−15.90%

−7.77%


−8.30%

DD 1M


−32.11%

−15.35%


−16.69%

DD Max


−45.32%

−19.68%


−22.65%

¯

H



w

0.00%


58.58%

9.04%


¯

G

w



0.00%

85.13%


45.69%

¯

T



w

0.00%


4.16%

2.30%


¯

H

rc



4.33%

58.58%


0.00%

¯

G



rc

39.09%


85.13%

0.00%


Figure 2: Cumulative returns of the three strategies for the Global Diversied Port-

folio


17

We propose an alternative approach based on equalizing risk contributions from

the various components of the portfolio. This way, we try to maximize dispersion

of risks, applying some kind of 1/n lter in terms of risk. It constitutes a special

form of risk budgeting where the asset allocator is distributing the same risk budget

to each component, so that none is dominating (at least on an ex-ante basis). This

middle-ground positioning is particularly clear when one is looking at the hierarchy

of volatilities. We have derived closed-form solutions for special cases, such as when

a unique correlation coecient is shared by all assets. However, numerical opti-

mization is necessary in most cases due to the endogeneity of the solutions. All in

all, determining the ERC solution for a large portfolio might be a computationally-

intensive task, something to keep in mind when compared with the minimum vari-

ance and, even more, with the 1/n competitors. Empirical applications show that

equally-weighted portfolios are inferior in terms of performance and for any measure

of risk. Minimum variance portfolios might achieve higher Sharpe ratios due to lower

volatility but they can expose to higher drawdowns in the short run. They are also

always much more concentrated and appear largely less ecient in terms of portfolio

turnover.

Empirical applications could be pursued in various ways. One of the most promis-

ing would consist in comparing the behavior of equally-weighted risk contributions

portfolios with other weighting methods for major stock indices. For instance, in

the case of the S&P 500 index, competing methodologies are already commercialized

such as capitalization-weighted, equally-weighted, fundamentally-weighted (Arnott

et al. [2005]) and minimum-variance weighted (Clarke et al. [2002]) portfolios. The

way ERC portfolios would compare with these approaches for this type of equity

indices remains an interesting open question.

18


References

[1] Arnott, R., Hsu J. and Moore P. (2005), Fundamental indexation, Financial

Analysts Journal, 61(2), pp. 83-99

[2] Benartzi S. and Thaler R.H. (2001), Naive diversication strategies in de-

ned contribution saving plans, American Economic Review, 91(1), pp. 79-98.

[3] Booth D. and Fama E. (1992), Diversication and asset contributions, Finan-

cial Analyst Journal, 48(3), pp. 26-32.

[4] Bera A. and Park S. (2008), Optimal portfolio diversication using the max-

imum entropy principle, Econometric Reviews, 27(4-6), pp. 484-512.

[5] Choueifaty Y. and Coignard Y. (2008), Towards maximum diversication,

Journal of Portfolio Management, 34(4), pp. 40-51.

[6] Clarke R., de Silva H. and Thorley S. (2002), Portfolio constraints and the

fundamental law of active management, Financial Analysts Journal, 58(5), pp.

48-66.


[7] Clarke R., de Silva H. and Thorley S. (2006), Minimum-variance portfolios

in the U.S. equity market, Journal of Portfolio Management, 33(1), pp. 10-24.

[8] DeMiguel V., Garlappi L. and Uppal R. (2009), Optimal Versus Naive Di-

versication: How Inecient is the 1/N Portfolio Strategy?, Review of Financial

Studies, 22, pp. 1915-1953.

[9] Estrada J. (2008), Fundamental indexation and international diversication,

Journal of Portfolio Management, 34(3), pp. 93-109.

[10] Fernholtz R., Garvy R. and Hannon J. (1998), Diversity-Weighted index-

ing, Journal of Portfolio Management, 4(2), pp. 74-82.

[11] Hallerbach W. (2003), Decomposing portfolio Value-at-Risk: A general anal-

ysis, Journal of Risk, 5(2), pp. 1-18.

[12] Jorion P. (1986), Bayes-Stein estimation for portfolio analysis, Journal of Fi-

nancial and Quantitative Analysis, 21, pp. 293-305.

[13] Lindberg C. (2009), Portfolio optimization when expected stock returns are

determined by exposure to risk, Bernouilli, forthcoming.

[14] Markowitz H.M. (1952), Portfolio selection, Journal of Finance, 7, pp. 77-91.

[15] Markowitz H.M. (1956), The optimization of a quadratic function subjet to

linear constraints, Naval research logistics Quarterly, 3, pp. 111-133.

[16] Markowitz H.M. (1959), Portfolio Selection: Ecient Diversication of In-

vestments, Cowles Foundation Monograph 16, New York.

19


[17] Martellini L. (2008), Toward the design of better equity benchmarks, Journal

of Portfolio Management, 34(4), pp. 1-8.

[18] Merton R.C. (1980), On estimating the expected return on the market: An

exploratory investigation, Journal of Financial Economics, 8, pp. 323-361.

[19] Michaud R. (1989), The Markowitz optimization enigma: Is optimized opti-

mal?, Financial Analysts Journal, 45, pp. 31-42.

[20] Neurich Q. (2008), Alternative indexing with the MSCI World Index, SSRN,

April.


[21] Qian E. (2005), Risk parity portfolios: Ecient portfolios through true diver-

sication, Panagora Asset Management, September.

[22] Qian E. (2006), On the nancial interpretation of risk contributions: Risk bud-

gets do add up, Journal of Investment Management, Fourth Quarter.

[23] Scherer B. (2007a), Can robust portfolio optimisation help to build better

portfolios?, Journal of Asset Management, 7(6), pp. 374-387.

[24] Scherer B. (2007b), Portfolio Construction & Risk Budgeting, Riskbooks,

Third Edition.

[25] Tütüncü R.H and Koenig M. (2004), Robust asset allocation, Annals of Op-

erations Research, 132, pp. 132-157.

[26] Windcliff H. and Boyle P. (2004), The 1/n pension plan puzzle, North Amer-

ican Actuarial Journal, 8, pp. 32-45.

20


A Appendix

A.1 The MV portfolio with constant correlation

Let R = C

n

(ρ)



be the constant correlation matrix. We have R

i,j


= ρ

if i = j and

R

i,i


= 1

. We may write the covariance matrix as follows: Σ = σσ

R

. We have



Σ

−1

= Γ



R

−1

with Γ



i,j

=

1



σ

i

σ



j

and


R

−1

=



ρ11 − ((n − 1) ρ + 1) I

(n − 1) ρ

2

− (n − 2) ρ − 1



.

With these expressions and by noting that tr (AB) = tr (BA), we may compute the

MV solution x = Σ

−1

1 /1 Σ



−1

1

. We have:



x

i

=



− ((n − 1) ρ + 1) σ

−2

i



+ ρ

n

j=1



i

σ



j

)

−1



n

k=1


− ((n − 1) ρ + 1) σ

−2

k



+ ρ

n

j=1



k

σ



j

)

−1



.

Let us consider the lower bound of C

n

(ρ)


which is achieved for ρ = − (n − 1)

−1

. It



comes that the solution becomes:

x

i



=

n

j=1



i

σ



j

)

−1



n

k=1


n

j=1


k

σ



j

)

−1



=

σ

−1



i

n

k=1



σ

−1

k



.

This solution is exactly the solution of the ERC portfolio in the case of constant

correlation. This means that the ERC portfolio is similar to the MV portfolio when

the unique correlation is at its lowest possible value.

A.2 On the relationship between the optimization problem (7) and

the ERC portfolio

The Lagrangian function of the optimization problem (7) is:

f (y; λ, λ

c

) =


y Σy − λ y − λ

c

n



i=1

ln y


i

− c


The solution y veries the following rst-order condition:

y



i

(y; λ, λ


c

) = ∂


y

i

σ (y) − λ



i

− λ


c

y

−1



i

= 0


and the Kuhn-Tucker conditions:

min (λ


i

, y


i

) = 0


min (λ

c

,



n

i=1


ln y

i

− c) = 0



Because ln y

i

is not dened for y



i

= 0


, it comes that y

i

> 0



and λ

i

= 0



. We notice

that the constraint

n

i=1


ln y

i

= c



is necessarily reached (because the solution can

not be y = 0), then λ

c

> 0


and we have:

y

i



∂ σ (y)

∂ y


i

= λ


c

21


We verify that risk contributions are the same for all assets. Moreover, we remark

that we face a well know optimization problem (minimizing a quadratic function

subject to lower convex bounds) which has a solution. We then deduce the ERC

portfolio by normalizing the solution y such that the sum of weights equals one.

Notice that the solution x may be found directly from the optimization problem (8)

by using a constant c = c − n ln (

n

i=1


y

i

)



where c is the constant used to nd y .

A.3 On the relationship between σ

erc

, σ


1/n

and σ


mv

Let us start with the optimization problem (8) considered in the body part of the

text:

x (c)


=

arg min


x Σx


u.c.



n

i=1



ln x

i

≥ c



1 x = 1

0 ≤ x ≤ 1

We remark that if c

1

≤ c



2

, we have σ (x (c

1

)) ≤ σ (x (c



2

))

because the constraint



n

i=1


ln x

i

− c ≥ 0



is less restrictive with c

1

than with c



2

. We notice that if c =

−∞

, the optimization problem is exactly the MV problem, and x (−∞) is the MV



portfolio. Because of the Jensen inequality and the constraint

n

i=1



x

i

= 1



, we have

n

i=1



ln x

i

≤ −n ln n



. The only solution for c = −n ln n is x

i

= 1/n



, that is the 1/n

portfolio. It comes that the solution for the general problem with c ∈ [−∞, −n ln n]

satises:

σ (x (−∞)) ≤ σ (x (c)) ≤ σ (x (−n ln n))

or:

σ

mv



≤ σ (x (c)) ≤ σ

1/n


Using the result of Appendix 1, it exists a constant c such that x (c ) is the ERC

portfolio. It proves that the inequality holds:

σ

mv

≤ σ



erc

≤ σ


1/n

A.4 Concentration and turnover statistics

The concentration of the portfolio is computed using the Herndahl and the Gini

indices. Let x

t,i

be the weights of the asset i for a given month t. The denition of



the Herndahl index is :

h

t



=

n

i=1



x

2

t,i



,

with x


t,i

∈ [0, 1]


and

i

x



t,i

= 1


. This index takes the value 1 for a perfectly

concentrated portfolio (i.e., where only one component is invested) and 1/n for a

portfolio with uniform weights. To scale the statistics onto [0, 1], we consider the

modied Herndahl index :

H

t

=



h

t

− 1/n



1 − 1/n

.

22



The Gini index G is a measure of dispersion using the Lorenz curve. Let X be a

random variable on [0, 1] with distribution function F . Mathematically, the Lorenz

curve is :

L (x) =


x

0

θ dF (θ)



1

0

θ dF (θ)



If all the weights are uniform, the Lorenz curve is a straight diagonal line in the

(x, L (x))

called the line of equality. If there is any inequality in size, then the

Lorenz curve falls below the line of equality. The total amount of inequality can be

summarized by the Gini index which is computed by the following formula:

G = 1 − 2

1

0

L (x) dx.



Like the modied Herndahl index, it takes the value 1 for a perfectly concentrated

portfolio and 0 for the portfolio with uniform weights. In order to get a feeling of

diversication of risks, we also apply concentration statistics to risk contributions.

In the tables of results, we present the average values of these concentration statistics

for both the weights (denoted as ¯

H

w



and ¯

G

w



respectively) and the risk contributions

(denoted as ¯

H

rc

and ¯



G

rc

respectively).



We nally analyze the turnover of the portfolio. We compute it between two

consecutive rebalancing dates with the following formula:

T

t

=



n

i=1


|x

t,i


− x

t−1,i


|

2

.



Notice that this denition of turnover implies by construction a value of zero for the

1/n


portfolio while in practice, one needs to execute trades in order to rebalance the

portfolio towards the 1/n target. However, apart in special circumstances, this eect

is of second order and we prefer to concentrate on modications of the portfolio

induced by active management decisions.In the tables of results, we indicate the

average values of T

t

across time. In general, we have preference for low values of H



t

,

G



t

and T


t

.

23


1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə