Arterial Pulse Power Analysis: The Lidco tm plus System A. Rhodes and R. Sunderland Introduction



Yüklə 89,93 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix28.03.2017
ölçüsü89,93 Kb.
#12795

Arterial Pulse Power Analysis:

The LiDCO

TM

plus System

A. Rhodes and R. Sunderland



Introduction

The aims of hemodynamic monitoring are to provide a comprehensive overview

of a patient’s circulatory status in order to inform and direct clinicians as to

diagnostic state, treatment strategies, and prognosis. The monitoring, therefore,

needs to provide useful information at an appropriate time and with limited

complications that could be directly attributed to the individual technique. Meas-

urement of cardiac output or stroke volume has been regarded as a necessary facet

of caring for critically ill patients, however until recently has been only possible

with the use of the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC). With the current controver-

sies regarding the use of the PAC, several new less invasive technologies have

become available to provide similar information. This chapter focuses on the use

of arterial pulse contour and power analysis as a technique to measure and moni-

tor cardiac output or stroke volume and focuses on the technology introduced by

the LiDCO company with their LiDCO

TM

plus monitor.

Arterial Pulse Contour Analysis

Arterial pulse contour analysis is a technique of measuring and monitoring stroke

volume on a beat-to-beat basis from the arterial pulse pressure waveform. This

has several advantages over existing technologies, as the majority of critically ill

patients already have arterial pressure traces transduced making the technique

virtually non-invasive and able to monitor changes in stroke volume and cardiac

output on an almost continuous basis.

History of Arterial Pulse Contour Analysis

(Table 1)

The first direct measurement of arterial blood pressure was by the Reverend

Stephen Hales in 1733. As early as 1899, the concept of using the blood pressure

waveform to measure blood flow changes was first suggested by Otto Frank [2].

Otto Frank described the circulation in terms of a Windkessel model (Windkes-

sel is the German word for air-chamber). The Windkessel model described the

loads faced by the heart in pumping blood through the pulmonary or systemic



circulations and the relationship between blood pressure and flow in the aorta or

pulmonary arteries. This model likens the heart and systemic arterial system to a

closed hydraulic circuit comprised of a water pump connected to a chamber. The

circuit is filled with water except for a pocket of air in the chamber. As water is

pumped into the chamber, the water both compresses the air in the pocket and

pushes water back out of the chamber, back to the pump. The compressibility of

air in the pocket simulates the elasticity and extensibility of the major arteries, as

blood is pumped through them from the heart. This is commonly referred to as

arterial compliance. The resistance that the water encounters whilst leaving the

Windkessel and flowing back to the pump equates to the resistance to flow that

blood  encounters  on  its passage through the arterial tree. This is  commonly

referred to as peripheral resistance. This somewhat simplistic view of the circula-

tion was referred to as the ‘2-element Windkessel model’ and has helped us to

understand the underlying physiology and, by solving the individual components

of the model, to calculate flow. Frank’s objective was to derive cardiac output from

the aortic pressure. By measuring the pulse wave velocity over the aorta (carotid

to femoral) the compliance could be estimated. Knowing the time constant from

the diastolic aortic pressure decay and compliance, the peripheral resistance could

then be derived. From mean pressure and resistance, using Ohm’s law, mean flow

could be calculated. This technique has been further refined in recent years to

develop a 3 and 4 element Windkessel model. This has been used to define the

systolic area under the pulse contour curve and thus help to estimate stroke volume.

In 1904, Erlanger and Hooker stated “Upon the amount of blood that is thrown

out by the heart during systole then, does the magnitude of the pulse-pressure in

the aorta depend” [3]. Although this is an intuitive statement, the translation of

these observations into a robust system of measuring cardiac output has had to

overcome a number of confounding problems that has led to the introduction of

this technique only in the last few years.



Table 1. History of pressure waveform analysis

1. Windkessel model of the circulation – Otto Frank, 1899 [1, 2]

2. First pulse pressure method – Erlanger and Hooker, 1904 – suggested that stroke volume is

proportional to the pulse pressure (systolic – diastolic) [3]

3. Requirement for calibration of pulse pressure by an independent cardiac output measure was

suggested by Wezler and Bogler in 1904 [21]

4. Pulse pressure simply corrected for arterial compliance was investigated by Liljestrand

and Zander, 1927

5. Compliance of the human aorta documented first by Remington et al., 1948 [4]

6. Aortic systolic area based pulse contour method, Kouchoukos et al., 1970 [5]

7. Systolic area with correction factors (3 element Windkessel model),

Wesseling and Jansen, 1993 [6, 7]

8. Compliance corrected pressure waveform ‘net’ pulse power approach – Band et al, 1996 [22]

184


A. Rhodes and R. Sunderland

Following Otto Frank, attention turned to using the aortic /arterial pulse pres-

sure to estimate the stroke volume. The concept centered around the theory that

fluctuations in blood pressure (pulse height) around a mean value are caused by

the volume of blood (the stroke volume) forced into the arterial conduit by each

systole. However, a number of complicating factors were identified – first the

requirement for calibration via an indicator dilution measurement. At that time

this was by no means a trivial problem and remained so until the recent advent of

transpulmonary indicator dilution techniques – such as the LiDCO lithium

method. Second, and of equal importance is the correction of pulse pressure

necessary due to the non-linear compliance of the arterial wall. Effectively this

means that when stretched (through the input of a further volume of blood) at a

higher blood pressure, the compliance of the aorta is less than at low blood

pressures. It was not until 1948 [4], that there were accurate enough data from

human aortas to attempt compliance correction of blood pressure data. So by the

1970s both compliance correction (to linearize the blood pressure data) and cali-

bration via indicator dilution (green dye and thermal indicators) was possible. This

led to the suggestion that one could move away from simplistic pulse pressure

approaches to actually measuring the systolic area (to closure of the aortic valve)

of the calibrated and compliance corrected waveform [5]. In essence, this approach

is one based on integrating the area of the systolic part of the linear pressure/volume

waveform. These approaches are generically referred to as Pulse Contour Methods

[5–7].


Table 2. Lithium dilution cardiac output (CO) measurement validation studies

Author


Species

Validation

Mean

Range


Bias

2 x SD


%Error

CO

of CO



of bias

Kurita [9]

Swine

PAC, EMF


1.5

0.2–2.8


0.1

0.36


24

Mason [10]

Dogs

PAC


3

1–13


0.1

0.9


30

Linton [11]

Horse

PAC


20*

12–42


–0.9

2.8


14

Corley [12]

Foals

PAC


13*

4–22


0.05

3.0


13

Garcia-


Human

PAC


6*

3.5–9.5


–0.5

1.2


20

Rodriguez [13]

Linton [14]

Human


TPTD

2

0.4–6



–0.1

0.6


30

Linton [15]

Human

PAC


5 *

2.4–10.2


–0.2

0.9


18

PAC: pulmonary artery catheter; EMF: electromagnetic flow probes; TPTD: transpulmonary

thermodilution; * is where the data for mean cardiac output are not readily available from the

papers and have had to be estimated from the original data.

Arterial Pulse Power Analysis: The LiDCO

TM

plus System



185

Pulse Pressure Relationship to Stroke Volume

The fluctuations of blood pressure around a mean value are caused by the volume

of blood (the stroke volume) forced into the arterial conduit by each systole. The

magnitude of this change in pressure – known as the pulse pressure – is a function

of the magnitude of the stroke volume. The translation of these concepts into a

workable system has been complicated by a number of factors that make this

relationship between pulse pressure and stroke volume more difficult:

1. The compliance of the aorta is not a linear relationship between pressure and

volume. This non-linearity prevents any simple approach to estimate volumes

from the pressure change. There needs to be correction for this non-linearity

for any individual patient.

2. Wave reflection. The pulse pressure measured from an arterial trace is actually

the combination of an incident pressure wave ejected from the heart and a

reflected pressure wave from the periphery. In order to calculate the stroke

volume, these two waves have to be recognized and separated. This is further

complicated by the fact that the reflected waves change in size dependent on the

proximity of the sampling site to the heart and also the patients age.

3. Damping. As the change in pressure around a mean value describes the stroke

volume, accurate pressure measurements are imperative. Unfortunately pres-

sure transducer systems used in routine clinical practice often suffer from either

being under or over damped, leading to imperfect waveforms and measure-

ments.


4. Aortic flow during systole. Although the filling of the aorta is on an intermittent

pulsatile basis, the outflow tends to be more continuous.



Ideal Algorithm for Arterial Pulse Contour Analysis

Taking  these problems discussed above into account, the ideal algorithm for

arterial pulse contour analysis would contain the following features:

1. The algorithm would work independent of the artery the blood pressure is

monitored from – despite the fact that the arterial pressure waveform shape and

pressure is changed by its transmission through the arterial tree to the periph-

ery.

2. It would correct for aortic non linearity and may be calibrated to take account



of individual variations in aortic characteristics and therefore give absolute

stroke volume.

3. It would be minimally or even not affected by changes in systemic vascular

resistance causing changes in reflected wave augmentation of the arterial pres-

sure.

4. It would not rely on identifying details of wave morphology.



5. It would be only minimally affected by the damping often seen in arterial lines.

186


A. Rhodes and R. Sunderland

The LiDCO

TM

plus Method of Pulse Power Analysis

The algorithm utilized for the LiDCO

TM

plus technique of arterial pulse power

analysis has a number of features that gets around the problems discussed above.

This approach is non morphology based, i.e., is not a pulse contour method.

Rather it is based on the assumption that the net power change in a heartbeat is the

balance between the input of a mass (stroke volume) of blood minus the blood

mass lost to the periphery during the beat. It is based on simple physics, i.e.,

conservation of mass/power and an assumption that following correction for

compliance and calibration there is a linear relationship between net power and

net flow. Autocorrelation is used to both define the beat period and the net power

change across the whole beat. In taking the whole beat, and not a portion of the

beat, the method is independent of the position of the reflected wave. Autocorre-

lation is a time based method and thereby avoids using a frequency approach to

measuring power (such as Fourier transforms) and thus the effects of arterial

damping (which change frequency response) are limited.

These can be summarized as follows:

1. The algorithm compliance corrects any arterial pressure signal to a stand-

ardized volume waveform (volume in arbitrary units) through the equation

∆V/∆bp = calibration x 250 x e

-k.bp

where V is volume, bp is blood pressure and k is the curve coefficient. The



number 250 represents the saturation value in mls, i.e., maximum additional

volume above the starting volume at atmospheric pressure that the aorta/arte-

rial tree can fill to.

2. Autocorrelation of the now standardized volume waveform – derives both the

period of the beat plus a net effective beat ‘power factor (R.M.S – root mean

square) which is proportional to the ‘nominal stroke volume ejected into the

aorta.

3. This ‘nominal’ stroke volume can be scaled to an actual stroke volume by an



independent indicator dilution measurement, e.g., lithium dilution cardiac

output from the LiDCO

TM

system.


4. The scaling/calibration factor corrects for the arterial tree compliance for a

given blood pressure and corrects for variations between individuals.

5. The scaling/calibration factor changes the saturation value (maximum volume

of the aorta/arterial tree) used for the compliance correcting equation – rather

than the curve coefficient (k). Thus any potential drift/change in the calibration

factor is limited to the extent that the aortic/arterial tree maximum volume can

change over the short term (hours).

Arterial Pulse Power Analysis: The LiDCO

TM

plus System



187

Theoretical benefits of the Pulse Power Approach

to Pulse Contour Analysis

In theory, the features of the pulse power algorithm enable the LiDCO

TM

plus to

have several advantages over the pulse contour/systolic area analysis approach.

These advantages include:

1. Any arterial site can be used for blood pressure measurement, not just a central

artery. As the algorithm looks at the power of the whole pulse contour and not

just the systolic area, morphology is not as important. The net power from the

input of stroke volume – outflow during the beat is calculated, thus negating the

effect of reflected waves.

2. The effect of damping on the transducer system will be similarly reduced.

Within reasonable limits the power of the waveform will remain the same,

whether the system is over or under damped and thus the changes in stroke

volume will remain accurate [15].

3. This system can be calibrated with any form of measurement of cardiac output,

so long as the error coefficient of the calibrating technique is less than the error

of the LiDCO

TM



plus system. The lithium dilution cardiac output system that is

incorporated in this technology (see later) enables a relatively non-invasive and

highly accurate mechanism of calibration.

Lithium Dilution Cardiac Output Measurement:

The LiDCO

TM

system

The technique of lithium dilution cardiac output measurement was described by

Linton in 1993. A bolus of isotonic lithium chloride (0.002–0.004 mmol/kg) is

injected using either central or peripheral venous access. The subsequent concen-

tration of lithium in the circulation is then measured by a lithium ion-selective

electrode situated in an appropriate arterial line. This information is used to

generate a concentration time curve and the cardiac output can then be calculated

from the known amount of lithium and the area under the curve after the first

peak, representing the cardiac output before recirculation. Lithium, long estab-

lished in psychiatric practice as a treatment for mania, has several advantages

when used as the indicator in a dilution technique; it does not naturally occur in

plasma and therefore can generate a high signal to noise ratio when using an ion

selective electrode to measure changes in plasma concentration thus allowing

small doses of lithium to be used. At these levels lithium is pharmacologically inert

and safe, toxic levels would only be achieved if the maximum recommended dose

were greatly exceeded. Rapid redistribution and no significant first pass loss from

the circulation add to the suitability of lithium for this technique [8].

The lithium ion selective electrode is central to the LiDCO system and is housed

in a flow-through cell attached to the manometer tubing of an arterial cannula. A

peristaltic pump is used to control the rate of blood flow through the sensor at 4

ml/min and the eccentric inlet insures mixing of the sample as it passes the

membrane selectively permeable to lithium. The Nernst equation relates the

plasma lithium concentration to the voltage across the membrane, after the appli-

188


A. Rhodes and R. Sunderland

cation of a correction for plasma sodium, the main determinant of baseline voltage

in the absence of lithium. An isolated amplifier is used to measure the voltage that

is then digitalized prior to analysis online. The sensor must be primed before use

with heparinized saline in order to make an electrical connection between the

reference electrode and the blood sample at the electrode tip.

Validation Studies – LiDCO calibration

Calibration precision is very important for arterial pressure waveform analysis

systems – the minimum specification is that calibration has to be at least as

accurate as green dye or averaged triplicate bolus pulmonary artery thermodilu-

tion. Inaccuracy beyond these standards will result in confusion between changes

in patient hemodynamic status and scatter in the measurement itself. Lithium

dilution has been validated against several methods including electromagnetic

flow probes and pulmonary artery thermodilution and has proven to be a very

robust and accurate mechanism for measuring cardiac output in both adults,

children and animals (Table 2) [9–15].

Linton et al. [15] demonstrated good overall agreement between thermodilution

and the LiDCO in 40 patients from a high dependency post operative unit and

intensive care unit (ICU). Thirty-four had undergone cardiac surgery requiring

cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) within the previous two days, the other diagnoses

were two recent myocardial infarcts, two septicemias, one acute respiratory distress

syndrome (ARDS), and one pericardectomy. Cardiac output was measured five

times in each patient using lithium dilution (single measurement) and bolus

thermodilution (series of three to six measurements according to standard clinical

practice and taking the average of the closest three). Linear regression analysis

(r

2



= 0.94) for lithium dilution vs. thermodilution demonstrated that lithium dilu-

tion was at least as accurate as bolus thermodilution.

Kurita et al. [9] compared cardiac output measurements in their sample group

of ten pigs undergoing general anesthesia; they used LiDCO, thermodilution, and

electromagnetic flowmetry. This necessitated a PAC, femoral artery catheter and

an electromagnetic flowmeter placed around the ascending aorta. Baseline meas-

urements for all three techniques were compared to hyper- and hypodynamic states

induced by dobutamine and propranolol, respectively. Over a range of cardiac

outputs from 0.2 to 2.8 l/min, the correlation between LiDCO and electromagnetic

flowmetry (r

2

= 0.95) was higher than that between thermodilution and electro-



magnetic flowmetry (r

2

= 0.87) suggesting that the LiDCO was more reliable than



conventional thermodilution.

In all the studies validating the LiDCO to date, acceptable levels of bias and

precision have been found (Table 2). This suggests that the LiDCO system is at least

as accurate and effective as standard thermodilution. Several other studies have

also assessed the necessity for the lithium injection to be made via the central

venous route [13,16–17]. All of these studies concluded that a peripheral venous

injection was just as accurate.

Arterial Pulse Power Analysis: The LiDCO

TM

plus System



189

Validation Studies – Pulse Power Analysis

with LiDCO

TM

plus System

(Table 3)

The pulse power approach has been validated in a number of clinical settings

[18–20]. A number of these studies have now been published and a number

presented at International meetings and are awaiting publication. Although the

evidence is accumulating to demonstrate the accuracy of this technique, the vali-

dation set is not yet complete and future studies are awaited.

The accuracy of the pulse power technique has been assessed in comparison to

lithium dilution as well as PAC techniques. The validation has been performed in

surgical as well as ICU settings for up to eight hours between calibration intervals.

The data suggest that the pulse power approach remains accurate for long time

periods with minimal drift. The data remain accurate despite changes in peripheral

resistance although users would be advised to make a recalibration prior to a major

therapeutic shift if a calibration had not been made in the recent past. The data also

remains accurate despite suboptimal arterial line damping characteristics [19].

Limitations

The main limitations to this technology revolve around the use of the lithium. As

the technique requires a large difference between the signal and background noise

to get a reliable indicator dilution curve, it can be difficult to get reliable readings

in patients already on therapeutic lithium. Other drugs that can cross react with

the lithium sensor are high peak doses of muscle relaxants and these can cause the

sensor to drift. If this system is to be used intra-operatively, then the lithium

Table 3. Validation studies of the pulse power algorithm in the Lidco

tm



plus System

Author


Species

Validation

Mean

Range


Bias

2 x SD


%Error

CO

of CO



of bias

Hamilton [18]

Post

LiDCO


5.5*

3.3–8.5


0.1

1.2


22

cardiac


surgery

(8hrs)


Jonas [20]

ICU


LiDCO

8.2


5.3–17.1

0.3


1.7

21

Pittman [19]



ICU for

LiDCO


6

3.5–10.5


0.15

1.3


22

24 hours


Heller [23]

Intra op.

LiDCO

5*

2.7–21.3



0

1.0


20

2.5–8.5


hours

* is where the data for mean cardiac output (CO) are not readily available from the papers and

have had to be estimated from the original data.

190


A. Rhodes and R. Sunderland

calibration needs to be performed either prior to the use of muscle relaxation or

after the initial peak has had time to subside.



Conclusion

The LiDCO

TM

plus system of cardiac output measurement and monitoring ap-

pears to be a safe and effective method of tracking flow. It is minimally invasive

and easy to use under the majority of clinical conditions likely to be encountered.

References

1. Frank O (1930) Schätzung des Schlagvolumens des menschlichen Herzens auf Grund der

Wellen- und Windkesseltheorie. Zeitschrift für Biologie 90:405–409

2. Frank O (1899) Die Grundform des arteriellen Pulses. Erste Abhandlung. Mathematische

Analyse. Zeitschrift für Biologie 37:485–526

3. Erlanger J, Hooker DR (1904) An experimental study of blood pressure and of pulse pressure

in man. John Hopkins Hospital Records 12:145–378

4. Remington JW, Nobach CB, Hamilton WF, Gold JJ (1948) Volume elasticity characteristics

of the human aorta and the prediction of stroke volume from the pressure pulse. Am J Physiol

153:198–308

5. Kouchoukos NT, Sheppard LC, McDonald DA (1970) Estimation of stroke volume in the dog

by a pulse contour method. Circ Res 26:611–623

6. Wesseling KH, de Wit B, Weber JAP, Smith NT (1983) A simple device for the continuous

measurement of cardiac output. Adv Cardiovasc Phys 5:16–52

7. Jansen JRC, Wesseling KH, Settels JJ, Schreuder JJ (1990) Continuous cardiac output moni-

toring by pulse contour during cardiac surgery. Eur Heart J 11:26–32.

8. Jonas MM, Linton RAF, OBrien TK, et al (2001) The pharmokinetics of intravenous lithium

chloride in patients and normal volunteers. Journal of Trace and Microprobe Techniques

19:313–320

9. Kurita T, Morita K, Kato S, et al (1997) Comparison of the accuracy of the lithium dilution

technique with the thermodilution technique for measurement  of cardiac output. Br J

Anaesthesiol 79:770–775

10. Mason DJ, OGrady M, Woods P, McDonell W (2001) Assessment of lithium dilution cardiac

output as a technique for measurement of cardiac output in dogs. Am J Vet Res 62:1255–1261

11. Linton RA, Young LE, Marlin DJ, et al (2000) Cardiac output measured by lithium dilution,

thermodilution and transoesophageal Doppler echocardiography in anaesthetised horses.

Am J Vet Res 61:731–737

12. Corley KTT, Donaldson LL, Furr M (2002) Comparison of lithium dilution and thermodilu-

tion cardiac output measurements in anaesthetised neonatal foals. Equine Vet J 34:598–601

13. Garcia-Rodriguez C, Pittman J, Cassell CH, et al (2002) Cardiac output measurement without

pulmonary artery or central venous cathetrization: a clinical assessment of the lithium

indicator dilution method. Crit Care Med 30:2199–2204

14. Linton RA, Jonas MM, Tibby SM, et al (2000) Cardiac output measured by lithium dilution

and transpulmonary thermodilution in patients in a paediatric intensive care unit. Intensive

Care Med 26:1507–1511

15. Linton R, Band D, OBrien T, et al (1997) Lithium dilution cardiac output measurement: a

comparison with thermodilution. Crit Care Med 25:1796–1800

Arterial Pulse Power Analysis: The LiDCO

TM

plus System



191

16. Mason DJ, O’Grady M, Woods JP, McDonell W (2002 ) Comparison of a central and a

peripheral (cephalic vein) injection site for the measurement of cardiac output using the

lithium-dilution cardiac output technique in anesthetized dogs. Can J Vet Res 66:207–210

17. Jonas MM, Kelly FE, Linton RA, Band DM, O’Brien TK, Linton NW (1999 ) A comparison of

lithium dilution cardiac output measurements made using central and antecubital venous

injection of lithium chloride. J Clin Monit Comput 15:525–528

18. Hamilton TT, Huber LM, Jessen ME (2002) PulseCO: a less invasive method to monitor

cardiac output from arterial pressure after cardiac surgery. Ann Thorac Surg 74:S1408–1412

19. Pittman JA, Sum Ping JS, Sherwood MW, El-Moalem H, Mark JB (2004) Continuous cardiac

output monitoring by arterial pressure waveform analysis: a 24 hour comparison with the

lithium dilution indicator technique. Crit Care Med (in press)

20. Jonas MM, Tanser SJ (2002) Lithium dilution measurement of cardiac output and arterial

pulse waveform analysis: an indicator dilution calibrated beat-by-beat system for continuous

estimation of cardiac output. Curr Opin Crit Care 8:257–261

21. Wezler K, Boger A (1939) Die Dynamik des arteriellen Systems. Der arterielle Blutdruck und

seine Komponenten. Ergebn Physiol 41:292–306

22.

Band D


,

O’Brien T, Linton N, Jonas M, Linton R (1996) Point-of-care sensor technology for

critical care applications. Presentation at Colloquium on New Measurements and Techniques

in Intensive Care, London, December.

23. Heller LB, Fisher M, Pfanzelter N, Jayakar D, Jeevanandam V, Aronson S (2002) Continuous

intra-operative cardiac output determination with arterial pulse wave analysis (PulseCO TM)

is valid and precise. Anesth Analg 93:SCA7 (abst)

192


A. Rhodes and R. Sunderland

Yüklə 89,93 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə