Current Concepts Review The Pathogenesis of Hallux Valgus



Yüklə 294,21 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/4
tarix28.04.2017
ölçüsü294,21 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

Current Concepts Review

The Pathogenesis of Hallux Valgus

A.M. Perera, FRCS(Orth), Lyndon Mason, MRCS(Eng), and M.M. Stephens, FRCSI

Investigation performed at the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, United Kingdom

ä

The first ray is an inherently unstable axial array that relies on a fine balance between its static (capsule, ligaments,



and plantar fascia) and dynamic stabilizers (peroneus longus and small muscles of the foot) to maintain its

alignment.

ä

In some feet, there is a genetic predisposition for a nonlinear osseous alignment or a laxity of the static stabilizers



that disrupts this muscle balance. Poor footwear plays an important role in accelerating the process, but occu-

pation and excessive walking and weight-bearing are unlikely to be notable factors.

ä

Many inherent or acquired biomechanical abnormalities are identified in feet with hallux valgus. However, these



associations are incomplete and nonlinear.

ä

In any patient, a number of factors have come together to cause the hallux valgus. Once this complex pathogenesis



is unraveled, a more scientific approach to hallux valgus management will be possible, thereby enabling treatment

(conservative or surgical) to be tailored to the individual.

In the nineteenth century, hallux valgus was thought to be due

to an enlargement of the metatarsophalangeal joint of the great

toe

1

. It was not until Carl Hueter (1838-1882), a German-born



surgeon, coined the term hallux abducto valgus

2

that the de-



formity was more correctly described as a lateral deviation of

the great toe at the metatarsophalangeal joint. A century of

debate has failed to settle the importance of intrinsic versus

extrinsic causes in the etiology of hallux valgus. In the 1950s,

Sim-Fook and Hodgson compared shoe-wearing and non-

shoe-wearing groups and showed a dramatic increase in the

prevalence of hallux valgus among the shoe-wearing group

3

.



Unfortunately, it did not explain the prevalence of hallux valgus

in the community of people who had never worn shoes, nor did

it account for the many individuals who wear high-fashion

footwear and never become affected. Clearly, the issue is more

complex than simply a problem of footwear. Although much

research has been done to define the multifactorial origin of

hallux valgus and the effect of those factors on surgical out-

comes, the quality and strength of this evidence have been

variable.

Pathoanatomy of Hallux Valgus

Development of Hallux Valgus (Figs. 1 through 4)

It is generally accepted

4,5

that hallux valgus occurs in steps,



frequently on a background of several predisposing factors

(Table I). These steps do not necessarily occur in series but may

transpire in parallel. These steps are as follows:

1. As the only medial supporting structures of the first

metatarsophalangeal joint are the medial sesamoid and medial

collateral ligaments, their failure is the ‘‘early and essential

lesion.’’

6

2. The metatarsal head can then drift medially, slipping



off the sesamoid apparatus. An oblique or an unstable tarso-

metatarsal joint may encourage this movement.

Disclosure: None of the authors received payments or services, either directly or indirectly (i.e., via his or her institution), from a third party in support of

any aspect of this work. One or more of the authors, or his or her institution, has had a financial relationship, in the thirty-six months prior to submission of

this work, with an entity in the biomedical arena that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work. No

author has had any other relationships, or has engaged in any other activities, that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what

is written in this work. The complete Disclosures of Potential Conflicts of Interest submitted by authors are always provided with the online version of the

article.


1650

C

OPYRIGHT



Ó 2011

BY

T



HE

J

OURNAL OF



B

ONE AND


J

OINT


S

URGERY


, I

NCORPORATED

J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2011;93:1650-61

d

http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.H.01630



3. The proximal phalanx moves into a valgus position as

it is tethered at its base to the sesamoids, the deep transverse

ligament (via the plantar plate), and the adductor hallucis

tendon.


4. The metatarsal head sits on the medial sesamoid and

can erode the cartilage and the crista. The lateral sesamoid can

appear to sit in the intermetatarsal space although it does not

actually move.

Fig. 1

Fig. 2


Fig. 1 Illustration of the medial view of the hallux, showing the medial structures whose failure is essential for hallux valgus deformity to occur. Fig. 2

Illustration of the metatarsal head of the hallux in the anteroposterior plane, showing the medial shift of the metatarsal head (step 2 in the development of

hallux valgus), with the valgus displacement of the proximal phalanx due to its attachment to the sesamoids, the deep transverse ligament (via the plantar

plate), and the adductor hallucis tendon (step 3). The extensor hallucis longus bowstrings laterally (step 6).

Fig. 3

Fig. 4


Fig. 3 Illustration showing the medial shift of the metatarsal head in the axial plane (step 2 in the development of hallux valgus) and the pronation of the

metatarsal head that results from the muscle forces acting on it (step 7). The figure also illustrates the position of the sesamoids, abductor hallucis (AbH),

adductor hallucis (AdH), flexor hallucis longus (FHL), and extensor hallucis longus (EHL). Fig. 4 Illustration of the deformity of hallux valgus in the axial plane.

The metatarsal is pronated and shifted medially, resulting in the lateral shift of the abductor hallucis (AbH), adductor hallucis (AdH), flexor hallucis longus

(FHL), and extensor hallucis longus (EHL) (steps 6 and 8 in the development of hallux valgus). The bursa overlying the medial eminence thickens because of

the pressure effect of footwear on a prominent medial eminence (step 5). Because of the pressure of the medial sesamoid on the crista, the cartilage is

eroded and the crista flattened (step 4).

1651


T

H E


J

O U R N A L O F

B

O N E


& J

O I N T


S

U R G E R Y

d

J B J S


.

O R G


V

O L U M E

9 3 - A

d

N



U M B E R

1 7


d

S

E P T E M B E R



7 , 2 0 1 1

T

H E



P

AT H O G E N E S I S O F

H

A L L U X



V

A L G U S



5. The bursa overlying the medial eminence can thicken

because of the pressure effect of footwear on a prominent

medial eminence.

6. The extensor and flexor hallucis longus tendons appear

to bowstring laterally

7

, increasing the valgus displacement and



occasionally acting as dorsiflexors of the proximal phalanx.

7. As the metatarsal head drops off the sesamoid

apparatus, it pronates because of the muscle forces acting

across it.

8. Normally, the abductor hallucis strongly resists valgus

of the proximal phalanx, but it becomes dysfunctional as its

medial and plantar attachment rotates inferiorly

8

. The adduc-



tor hallucis is attached on the plantar surface laterally so it

tends to pull the phalanx into pronation as well as tethering

its base.

9. The weaker dorsal metatarsophalangeal joint capsule is

not reinforced by any tendons and rotates medially with

pronation and provides poor stability

9

.

10. The metatarsal head elevation with medial motion



can transfer plantar pressure laterally. The relatively mobile

fifth metatarsal may also splay.

First Ray Biomechanics

The first ray plays a key role in maintaining the structure of the

medial arch

9

, and as the main load-bearing structure



10

, it is


subject to substantial forces during gait. Failure anywhere along

the first ray, from the distal phalanx to the talonavicular joint,

can result in hallux valgus. It is therefore worth considering the

first ray biomechanics as a common factor to many of the key

theories. There are no tendon attachments on the metatarsal

head, and maintenance of this inherently unstable axial array

requires (1) a congruent and stable metatarsophalangeal joint

during push-off, (2) a distal metatarsal articulation angle that

encourages stability, (3) balanced static and dynamic restraints,

and (4) a stable tarsometatarsal joint

11

.

Sesamoids



The functions of the sesamoid bones are, first, to absorb

weight-bearing forces and enhance the load-bearing capacity

of the first ray. The sesamoids increase the moment arm of

the flexor hallucis brevis, which powers plantar flexion of the

hallux, and, finally, they function to elevate the first metatarsal

head, which dissipates the forces on the metatarsal head

12-16

.

The first metatarsal head is elevated on the sesamoids during



stance, but the sesamoids move during hallux dorsiflexion,

coming to lie anterior to the metatarsal head rather than in-

ferior. The sesamoid sling thus facilitates the first metatarsal

plantar flexion that is essential for hallux dorsiflexion.

The sesamoids can appear to subluxate with first meta-

tarsal pronation alone

17,18

, but true subluxation requires a



number of events to occur first. The joint reaction force of

the metatarsosesamoid joint is normally sufficient to prevent

subluxation

19

. Thus, the metatarsosesamoid joint must become



unloaded either by elevation of the first metatarsal head or by

the transfer of plantar pressure laterally. Finally, the soft-tissue

restraints and the cristae need to fail.

First Ray Motion

Morton believed that dorsal hypermobility of the first meta-

tarsal segment was responsible for the widest array of foot

deformity

20

. However, several studies have questioned whether



motion at the tarsometatarsal joint even exists

21-24


. The studies

that described motion of the first tarsometatarsal joint had

no consensus with regard to either the axis of movement or

the magnitude. In so-called normal feet, the small amount of

movement permitted at the first tarsometatarsal joint is am-

plified by the long metatarsal shaft, resulting in an average

dorsoplantar motion of 6 mm

25

. However, the mean range of



motion of the entire first ray in the foot with hallux valgus is

significantly greater in both the sagittal and frontal planes.

First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Motion

The first metatarsophalangeal joint is a partial ball-and-socket

joint rather than a simple hinge. When the hallux is held stable

(as in push-off), the kinematic coupling of the first ray and the

ankle joint motion results in a frontal plane rotation, pronating

the great toe and causing a medial transverse plane motion. These

motions both increase the loading on the medial aspect of the

toe


26

, creating a valgus moment at the metatarsophalangeal

joint.

With the foot flat on the ground and loaded evenly (i.e.,



midstance), the dorsiflexion of the metatarsophalangeal joint is

limited to approximately 20° as further motion requires plantar

flexion of the first metatarsal

27

. The phalanx and metatarsal are



coupled such that 1° of phalangeal dorsiflexion requires 3° of

metatarsal plantar flexion

28

. The spiral-shaped nature of the



metatarsal head

29

forces a translational sliding motion as the



proximal phalanx rotates

30,31


. Thus, the locus of the axis of

rotation has to move in an arc

32

that necessitates metatarsal



motion proximally and plantarward in order to avoid com-

pression at the metatarsophalangeal joint. Prevention of this

plantar flexion hinders dorsiflexion of the first metatarsopha-

langeal joint even when non-weight-bearing

33

. Plantar flexion



of the first ray also maintains ground contact during heel rise

when the obliquity of the metatarsophalangeal break, which is

TABLE I Potential Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors

Extrinsic

Intrinsic

High-heeled narrow shoes

Genetics

Excessive weight-bearing

Ligamentous laxity

Metatarsus primus varus

Pes planus

Functional hallux limitus

Sexual dimorphism

Age


Metatarsal morphology

First-ray hypermobility

Tight Achilles tendon

1652


T

H E


J

O U R N A L O F

B

O N E


& J

O I N T


S

U R G E R Y

d

J B J S


.

O R G


V

O L U M E

9 3 - A

d

N



U M B E R

1 7


d

S

E P T E M B E R



7 , 2 0 1 1

T

H E



P

AT H O G E N E S I S O F

H

A L L U X



V

A L G U S



the axis of the four lateral metatarsophalangeal joints, is en-

hanced during late stance, causing lower-extremity external

rotation and inversion of the subtalar joint

34

.



Normal gait uses up to 65° of first metatarsophalangeal

dorsiflexion, and first ray elevation substantially compromises

this range of motion

35

. Furthermore, the normal hallux has a



tendency toward valgus (and any pronation further encourages

this tendency). This combination means that, when dorsiflexion

is restricted, the toe is forced to ‘‘escape’’ laterally in the direction

of least resistance. As the transverse sphericity of the first meta-

tarsal head

29

permits multiplanar motion



36

, the collaterals,

sesamoids, and the so-called rein effect of the first metatarso-

phalangeal joint rotator cuff are all required for stability.

Etiology of Hallux Valgus

The different factors can be divided into extrinsic and intrinsic

risks (Table I).

Extrinsic Factors

Footwear

Even prior to the understanding of hallux valgus pathology, the

use of footwear has been implicated as an etiology

1,37,38


. In 1909,

Porter


39

advised against performing corrective surgery on pa-

tients unwilling to wear appropriate footwear because of a

greater risk of recurrence of the deformity. There is a low

prevalence of hallux valgus in unshod populations

40,41


, and the

prevalence increases with changes in shoe fashion

42

. However,



the association is not complete (Table II), and footwear is not at

all important in juvenile hallux valgus

43

.

High heels are commonly blamed for hallux valgus, and



there is a direct association between increased first metatarsal

loading and a valgus moment

44

. This forefoot loading is exac-



erbated by the forefoot sliding forward into the toe-box, pro-

nating as it does so. A third of the population naturally favors

loading the lateral part of the forefoot and is at greatest risk of

this deformity. However, this forefoot loading is probably more

important in deformity progression than initiation

45

. There is



some limited evidence that altering the position of the heel

could counteract this tendency

28

.

The prevalence of hallux valgus in women who wear shoes



with a narrow toe-box or a high heel is certainly not 100%. This

may be due, in part, to the buttressing effect of the second toe, in

the association between hallux valgus and a hammer toe of the

second digit

46

or between the length of the great toe and risk of



hallux valgus

47

. So even in women, footwear is probably more



important in progression than causation. It is intuitive to pre-

sume that this risk is greater in those with a wider foot.

Excessive Loading

Hallux valgus develops slowly, suggesting a process of repetitive

trauma; however, despite a perception that occupation

48

or



excessive walking and weight-bearing

49

is important, there is no



proven link

50

. The only exception is a weak association with



ballet dancing

51,52


. Mann and Coughlin

53

reviewed the literature



on cumulative industrial trauma and dismissed any occupa-

tional link.

No clear link has been established between hallux valgus

and obesity

54

and other factors that affect loading such as foot



progression angle

55

or foot dominance



56

. There are differences

in metatarsal loading in hallux valgus, but the relevance is

unknown


56

.

Intrinsic Factors



Genetic Factors

A genetic predisposition has long been suspected

57

. Among


the inheritable factors that may be relevant are metatarsal

formula, arch height, and hypermobility

58,59

. The best evi-



dence showed that 90% of 350 white patients had at least one

affected relative

60

, with the most common pattern of inher-



itance being autosomal dominant with incomplete penetrance.

The role of genetics in juvenile

43

and young adult



49

hallux valgus

is much more established, with maternal transmission found in

94% (twenty-nine) of thirty-one patients with a family history.

There is weak evidence of a racial difference. The prevalence of

hallux valgus in whites has been reported to be two times greater

than that in black Africans

40,61


.

Sexual Dimorphism

The true sex ratio is unknown, although the male-to-female

ratio of 1:15

60,62,63

among those who have corrective surgery is

well established. The higher prevalence among women may be

due to footwear that is either poor (up to 90% of shoes in a

survey of 365 women were too small

64

) or less forgiving, re-



sulting in earlier and more frequent presentation. Nevertheless,

the prevalence is still greater in women, but there is no quality

evidence to support the finding

65

. Even less is known of the



prevalence between the sexes with regard to juvenile hallux

valgus.


There are fundamental differences in osseous anatomy

66

;



for instance, the metatarsal head articular surface in female

patients is more rounded and smaller, providing a less stable

joint

67

. Women also tend to have a more adducted first meta-



tarsal

68

, which in turn may be due to differences in the tarso-



metatarsal articulation

69

. Other differences include metatarsal



dimension and distal and proximal articulation shape and

TABLE II Prevalence of Deformity in Shod and Unshod Feet*

Deformity

Shod


Feet (%)

Unshod


Feet (%)

Hallux valgus

33

2

Flatfoot



11

5

Atavistic forefoot



7

17

Metatarsus elevatus



7

39

Metatarsus primus varus



6

25

Hypermobility of the metatarsus



1

13

*The data are from the study by Sim-Fook and Hodgson



3

. There


were 118 subjects in the group that wore shoes and 107 subjects in

the group that did not wear shoes.

1653

T

H E



J

O U R N A L O F

B

O N E


& J

O I N T


S

U R G E R Y

d

J B J S


.

O R G


V

O L U M E

9 3 - A

d

N



U M B E R

1 7


d

S

E P T E M B E R



7 , 2 0 1 1

T

H E



P

AT H O G E N E S I S O F

H

A L L U X



V

A L G U S



angle

68,70


. Differences in foot pressures have been noted, but the

significance of these findings is unknown

71

.

Ligamentous laxity



72

and first ray hypermobility

73

are


more common in women, although several major series on the

outcomes of hallux valgus surgery have failed to provide male-

to-female ratios

9,74-77


. No link has been made with pregnancy.

Systemic Conditions

Ligamentous Laxity

Mild ligamentous laxity is common in women with hallux

valgus

78

and has been reported in 70% of twenty patients with



juvenile hallux valgus

74

. Therefore, in conditions with generalized



ligamentous laxity

79

, such as Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos



syndrome

10

, and rheumatoid arthritis



80

, hallux valgus is more

common and more difficult to treat. It is interesting, although

counterintuitive, that the only study assessing laxity with

use of the Beighton scoring system

81

failed to find any as-



sociation between generalized ligamentous laxity and hal-

lux valgus

78

. Despite the fact that patients with laxity have a



major risk for recurrence, little work has been done on this

condition

82-84

.

Age



A biomechanical study in elderly patients

85,86


showed that

changes in posture, joint kinematics, and plantar pressure are


Yüklə 294,21 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə