O riginal a rticle colonic Volvulus in the United States Trends, Outcomes, and Predictors of Mortality


TABLE 2. Demographic Characteristics and Comorbidities for Sigmoid and Cecal Volvulus Cases That Underwent Resection N



Yüklə 248,72 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/3
tarix01.05.2017
ölçüsü248,72 Kb.
1   2   3

TABLE 2. Demographic Characteristics and Comorbidities

for Sigmoid and Cecal Volvulus Cases That Underwent

Resection

N

Sigmoid Volvulus

19,220

Cecal Volvulus

23,392

Age, yr


71 (62–82)

63 (52–78)

Sex, %

Male


65.5

27.0


Female

34.5


73.0

Ethnicity (%)

White

53.3


66.8

Black


14.9

4.9


Hispanic

4.6


2.2

Asian or Pacific Islander

0.9

0.2


Native American

0.4


0.4

Other


1.8

1.1


Missing

24.1


24.4

Primary payer type (%)

Medicare

49.6


38.1

Medicaid


4.3

3.5


Private including HMO

10.3


26.5

Self-pay


1.6

2.4


No charge

0.1


0.2

Other


1.0

1.6


Missing

33.1


27.7

Comorbidities (%)

Anemia

16.6


11.7

Congestive heart failure

16.8

10.4


Chronic pulmonary disease

16.6


20.6

Diabetes


17.2

9.5


Hypertension

43.9


36.1

Liver disease

0.8

1.4


Fluid and electrolyte disorders

48.1


36.4

Obesity


2.7

2.4


Renal failure

5.8


4.6

Weight loss

12.9

9.9


Neurological disorder or paralysis

31.3


8.0

Comorbidity scores

7.4 (3.00–12.00)

4.7 (0.00–8.00)

Continuous variables such as age and comorbidity scores are reported as mean

and interquartile range; categorical variables (sex, ethnicity, payer type, and comor-

bidities) are reported as percent proportions.

HMO indicates health maintenance organization.

Laparoscopy was most commonly used in cases involving fixation of

the colon (Table 1).

Among patients with sigmoid or cecal volvulus who underwent

resection, mean age was higher in the sigmoid volvulus group and

male patients accounted for the majority of cases, whereas female sex

was more predominant in the cecal volvulus (Table 2). Looking at the

age histogram, the incidence of sigmoid volvulus peaked in the mid-

70s for both women and men. This in contrast to the age histogram

of cecal volvulus in which women demonstrated 2 incidence peaks:

1 in the mid-50s and another in the late 70s. Moreover, the frequency

of cecal volvulus in women seems to increase rapidly starting in their

early 30s (Fig. 1).

African Americans were present at a higher frequency in the

sigmoid volvulus group. Patients with sigmoid volvulus group tended

to have higher incidence of comorbidities, such as anemia, conges-

tive heart failure, hypertension, and fluid and electrolyte disorders.

Perhaps, the major difference was in the frequency of diabetes and

neuropsychiatric disorders including dementia and paralysis related

to cerebrovascular events. Comorbidity scores were higher in the

sigmoid group, reflecting a sicker patient population (Table 2).



FIGURE 1. Age histogram per sex for cecal volvulus and sig-

moid volvulus.

Looking at hospital characteristics in the sigmoid and cecal

volvulus groups, we observe that the majority of cases were performed

in nonteaching, urban, and large hospitals. The use of laparoscopy

was similar in the 2 groups; however, conversion rates were higher

in cases of cecal volvulus. A stoma was required in almost half of

sigmoid volvulus cases that underwent resection, whereas this was

much lower in cecal volvulus cases (Table 3).

The management of sigmoid volvulus and the associated out-

comes were similar in different hospital settings. The small differ-

ences observed were in the higher use of laparoscopy and the lower

associated conversion rates when comparing urban hospitals with ru-

ral hospitals. Stoma use and mortality rates were similar in different

hospital settings (Table 3). In cecal volvulus, the use of laparoscopy

was more common in urban than in rural hospitals. Stoma use was

higher in teaching than in nonteaching hospitals and higher in large

hospitals than in medium and small hospitals. Mortality rates were

similar in different hospital settings (Table 3).

Looking at surgical outcomes in sigmoid and cecal volvulus

cases that underwent resection, we note a longer length of stay in

the sigmoid volvulus group and a higher total charge. Mortality was

9.4% for sigmoid volvulus and 6.7% for cecal volvulus. Of note is that

anastomotic complications were high in both groups. The incidence

of respiratory failure, pneumonia, acute renal failure, urinary tract

infection, urinary retention, and deep vein thrombosis was higher in

the sigmoid volvulus group (Table 4).

The LASSO algorithm was applied to cases that underwent

resection for sigmoid volvulus and identified the presence of peri-

tonitis and bowel gangrene as the strongest predictors of mortality.

This was followed by the use of an ostomy and coagulopathy. Other

factors, such as the presence of chronic kidney disease, age more

than 70 years, chronic pulmonary or cardiac disease, and fluid and

electrolyte disorders, were also found to predict mortality (Table 5).

Performing surgery on an emergent or semielective basis and the use

of laparoscopy were not found to affect mortality. Hospital factors

were not found to impact mortality. The area under the curve (AUC)

for the predictive model was 0.74 (Fig. 2).

Looking at cecal volvulus, the LASSO algorithm identified

coagulopathy as the strongest predictor of mortality, followed by age

Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.

4

| www.annalsofsurgery.com

C

2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins


Annals of Surgery

r

Volume 00, Number 00, 2013



Colonic Volvulus in the United States

TABLE 3. Use of Laparoscopy, Conversion Rates, Use of Ostomy and Mortality Per Hospital Type, Location, and Bed Size

Sigmoid Volvulus (N

19,220)



Cecal Volvulus (N

23,392)



All (%)

Use of

Laparoscopy,

%

Conversion

Rate, %

Stoma

use, %

Mortality,

%

All, %

Use of

Laparoscopy,

%

Conversion

rate, %

Stoma

use, %

Mortality,

%

Hospital type

Teaching

41.5


7.2

18.8


49.8

8.8


41.8

7.0


33.1

14.2


6.1

Nonteaching

57.9

5.9


17.2

49.3


10.0

57.6


7.2

31.5


8.6

7.1


Missing

0.6


0.6

Location


Urban

84.8


6.8

16.8


50.0

9.5


84.5

7.7


33.0

11.1


6.5

Rural


14.6

4.4


28.0

46.5


9.6

14.9


3.8

22.2


10.1

7.4


Missing

0.6


0.6

Bed size


Small

8.7


7.7

23.1


45.9

5.9


9.7

9.3


32.6

8.9


7.0

Medium


17.7

8.2


21.0

50.3


9.4

18.2


9.8

33.3


8.9

7.8


Large

39.9


8.6

15.7


46.4

8.0


44.0

8.6


33.5

12.0


6.2

Missing


33.7

28.1


TABLE 4. Surgical Outcomes for Sigmoid Volvulus and Cecal Volvulus of Patients Who

Underwent Resection



N

Sigmoid Volvulus (N

19,220)



Cecal Volvulus (N

23,392)

Total charge ($)

80,352 (33,685–90,800)

68,935 (26,712–73,525)

Length of stay, d

15 (8–18)

11 (6–13)

Mortality

Died


9.4

6.7


Missing

0.28


0.04

Postoperative complications

Cerebrovascular accident

0.1


0.2

Cardiac complications

2.7

3.1


Respiratory failure

13.6


11.9

Pneumonia

10.0

7.5


Ileus/bowel obstruction

20.5


19.4

Anastomotic complications

15.8


15.2

Acute renal failure

14.5

11.8


UTI

18.1


8.9

Urinary retention

3.2

2.3


Postoperative bleeding

2.6


3.0

Wound complications

6.3

6.6


DVT

1.0


0.6

Continuous variables such as total charge and length of stay are reported as mean and interquartile range; categorical variables

are reported as percent proportions.

Including anastomotic leak, fistula, and intra-abdominal abscess.



DVT indicates deep vein thrombosis; UTI, urinary tract infection.

more than 60 years. The presence of peritonitis and bowel gangrene,

the use of an ostomy, and several comorbidities listed in Table 5 were

also found to be associated with worse outcomes. Again, the use of

laparoscopy and hospital factors were not found to affect mortality.

Interestingly, female sex, private insurance, and hypertension were

found to be protective against mortality relative to the variables identi-

fied in the model. The AUC for the predictive model was 0.82 (Fig. 3).



DISCUSSION

Colonic volvulus is a rare cause of bowel obstruction in

the United States, accounting only for 1.9% of admissions which

is in the range of previously published studies in the United

States that attributed 1.2% to 20% of all intestinal obstructions to

colonic volvulus.

20–23

The wide variation of incidence observed in



previous studies is due to demographic differences among the study

populations.

24

This was observed in our results with a higher inci-



dence of sigmoid volvulus in African Americans. The latter group

seems to be prone to the development of sigmoid volvulus because

of a long sigmoid mesentery with a narrow stalk.

8,9


This suggests

that anatomical factors are more important than dietary factors in the

pathogenesis of sigmoid volvulus. The incidence of colonic volvulus

in the United States is also lower than in other parts of the world, such

as Africa, Middle East, Russia, India, and Brazil, where colonic volvu-

lus accounts for 13% to 42% of all intestinal obstruction.

5,10,25,26

Most of these data are, however, outdated and more recent data sug-

gest that colonic volvulus seems to be decreasing in parts of the

African continent

27,28

and Middle East



29,30

possibly due to western-

ization of the diet,

31

population migration,



29

or change in etiological

patterns of bowel obstruction.

32

The epidemiology of the different types of colonic volvulus is



also changing. With an aging population in the United States,

33

one



would expect to see increasing numbers of sigmoid volvulus. This,

however, was not the case as yearly admissions for sigmoid volvu-

lus remained stable. The prevalence of diverticular disease in the

Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.

C

2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

www.annalsofsurgery.com

5


Halabi et al

Annals of Surgery

r

Volume 00, Number 00, 2013



TABLE 5. Predictors of Mortality of Patients With

Sigmoid Volvulus and Cecal Volvulus Who Underwent

Resection Based on the LASSO Algorithm

Coefficient

LASSO OR

Sigmoid volvulus

Intercept

− 2.95


0.05

Peritonitis/bowel gangrene/necrosis

0.61

1.84


Stoma use

0.46


1.58

Coagulopathy

0.46

1.58


Chronic kidney disease

0.24


1.27

Age


>70 yr

0.17


1.18

Chronic pulmonary disease

0.13

1.14


Congestive heart failure

0.04


1.04

Fluid and electrolytes disorders

0.01

1.01


Cecal volvulus

Intercept

− 3.45

0.03


Coagulopathy

0.91


2.49

Age


>60 yr

0.71


2.04

Metastatic cancer

0.54

1.71


Chronic kidney disease

0.43


1.53

Congestive heart failure

0.39

1.47


Stoma use

0.35


1.42

Fluid and electrolyte disorders

0.32

1.38


Weight loss

0.20


1.22

Pulmonary circulation disorder

0.17

1.18


Peritonitis/bowel gangrene/necrosis

0.12


1.13

Chronic pulmonary disease

0.07

1.07


Hypertension

− 0.04


0.96

Private insurance including HMO

− 0.08

0.92


Female

− 0.15


0.86

These coefficients can be added together to calculate the predicted inhospital

mortality risk for each individual. For a coefficient total of x, the inhospital

mortality risk is e



x

/(1


+ e

x

).

HMO indicates health maintenance organization; LASSO, least absolute



shrinkage and selection operator; OR, odds ratios.

FIGURE 2. ROC curve and C-statistic (AUC) describing the dis-

criminative power of the mortality predictive model for sig-

moid volvulus cases.

FIGURE 3. ROC curve and C-statistic (AUC) describing the dis-

criminative power of the mortality predictive model for cecal

volvulus cases.

United States and the associated high number of sigmoidectomies

34

may explain this finding. In contrast, we observed an increase in ce-



cal volvulus cases. Although this is neither supported nor refuted by

our data, one may try to explain this observed trend by the parallel

increase of screening colonoscopies as a result of large colorectal

cancer screening campaigns

35,36

and an overall increase in the use of



laparoscopic techniques. Air insufflation during colonoscopy leads

to cecal dilatation and may play a role in the development of cecal

volvulus.

37,38


During laparoscopy, pneumoperitoneum, patient posi-

tioning, lateral tilting of the operating table, and mobilization of parts

of the right colon have been implicated as causative factors in patients

with a mobile cecum.

39,40

Reports from the United States identified nearly equal pro-



portions of cecal volvulus and sigmoid volvulus.

5,13,41


Because of

limitations of the NIS database, these proportions are difficult to

obtain. However, if we consider all cases of endoscopic decompres-

sion for sigmoid volvulus to represent definitive treatment with no

recurrence, and moreover, if we consider cases of detorsion, fixation,

or enterostomy to be all performed for sigmoid volvulus, we find

cecal volvulus to account for at least 38% of all volvulus cases.

Cecal volvulus and sigmoid volvulus demonstrate differ-

ent demographics. While sigmoid volvulus was more common in

elderly men, the majority of patients with cecal volvulus were

younger women. Our findings are in line with previously reported

series.


5,6,13,25,42

Sigmoid volvulus in the United States affects an

older population compared with other countries where it is more

endemic.


43,44

The age histogram shows rising frequencies of cecal

volvulus in women in child-bearing age. This confirms previous re-

ports that described a link between cecal volvulus and pregnancy

when the gravid uterus comes out of the uterine cavity displacing the

cecum, thereby elongating its mesentery and making it more prone to

torsion during or immediately after delivery.

45,46


The incidence peak

of cecal volvulus observed in women in their mid-50s may also be due

to previous pelvic surgery. This corresponds to the age group where

many women in the United States have already had a hysterectomy.

47

Previous pelvic surgical procedures may create a mobile cecum or



lead to postoperative adhesions that may create an axis around which

Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.



6

| www.annalsofsurgery.com

C

2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins


Annals of Surgery

r

Volume 00, Number 00, 2013



Colonic Volvulus in the United States

the cecum can rotate.

42,48,49

The lower incidence of sigmoid volvulus

in women can be explained anatomically by the fact that women have a

capacious pelvis with lax abdominal musculature that can accommo-

date and allow the untwisting of a floppy sigmoid.

50

The previously



observed high incidence of sigmoid volvulus in patients with neu-

ropsychiatric diseases

12,13,24,51–53

and diabetes

54

is also confirmed



by our results and points toward an acquired pathology.

Examining the different management methods in colonic

volvulus, we observed that nonsurgical methods of colonic decom-

pression are not commonly used as the sole treatment measure and

are usually followed by more definitive surgery. Contrast enema in

the management of colonic volvulus was historically used for diag-

nostic and therapeutic reasons.

4,5,13,53,55,56

The rare identified cases

were older patients with multiple comorbidities, who probably were

not good surgical candidates. Colonoscopic decompression which

has a success rate of 70% to 90%

12,29,53,57

is mainly used for sigmoid

volvulus, as it is mostly unsuccessful for cecal volvulus.

5,13,58


It is,

however, considered a temporizing measure allowing surgery to be

performed on either an elective or a semielective basis after correction

of underlying fluid and electrolyte imbalance.

5,30

It is rarely advocated



as a definitive treatment because of the associated high-recurrence

rates of 20% to 70%.

1,4,30,53,57,59,60

Moreover, because the mortality

rate for recurrent sigmoid volvulus presenting emergently can be

as high as 33%,

53

several authors advocate resection as a form of



definitive management after initial colonoscopic decompression.

53,60


Surgical management of colonic volvulus can be broadly di-

vided into resective versus nonresective procedures. The use of non-

resective procedures such as detorsion with or without fixation or

enterostomy seems to be infrequent in the acute setting according

to our results. The reason for these findings are the high recurrence

rates after these procedures which are reported to be 22% to 25% for

detorsion of cecal volvulus,

61,62


20% to 30% for cecopexy,

6,63


9%

to 44% for simple detorsion of sigmoid volvulus,

6,64,65

and 28.5%



for sigmoidopexy.

25,65


In contrast to previously published series, we

found that operative detorsion with or without fixation was used in

younger populations. This may be explained by younger patients’ re-

fusal to have a resective procedure or in certain cases because the over-

all condition of the patient would not permit a colonic resection.

53,66


Sigmoidostomy and cecostomy with the use of a decompression tube

were uncommonly performed. These procedures that were more com-

mon decades ago

67

seem to have fallen out of favor as they are as-



sociated with high morbidity and recurrence rates.

68

Furthermore,



it seems from our analysis that their use is limited to patients not

suitable for resection.

Resective surgery with or without stoma was found to be the

most commonly performed surgical procedure in the acute setting.

Although a right hemicolectomy is usually sufficient to treat cecal

volvulus, the extent of resection for sigmoid volvulus has been the

subject of debate.

69

Recurrence has been reported after resection for



sigmoid volvulus depending on the extent of colonic involvement;

patients whose disease is limited to the sigmoid colon recur less than

those with associated megacolon and colonic atony.

70,71


The other

reason for performing an extended resection is that gangrene can

extend beyond the area of constriction in a patchy and ill-defined

pattern.


43

This likely explains the significant proportion of cases that

required a total or subtotal colectomy in our results.

The high use of stoma during resective surgery for sigmoid

volvulus as observed in our results is in line with previous reports

13,59


and can be explained by the high fecal and bacterial content of the

left colon

72

and the advanced age and comorbidities of patients with



sigmoid volvulus.

59

Although performing a primary anastomosis in



the setting of gangrene may lead to a high rate of anastomotic leak,

high fecal content load should not be the only reason to perform

a stoma, as a primary anastomosis may be safe in this setting.

73

The use of stoma was also observed in right hemicolectomy for cecal



volvulus. Cecal volvulus often presents late and sometimes represents

a diagnostic challenge delaying surgical treatment.

49,68

The thin cecal



wall is especially sensitive to dilatation and perforation, and a delay

in diagnosis and management can be detrimental.

Mortality rates of the different surgical procedures are in line

with previously reported data.

5,6,10,13,57,59,74,75

Compared with older

data, mortality rates did not change significantly. Cases managed la-

paroscopically seemed to have lower mortality rates. However, the

use of laparoscopy was observed in patients with lower comorbidity

scores, and these procedures are usually performed on a semielec-

tive basis after initial endoscopic decompression.

46,76,77


In contrast to

previously published data,

43,78

we did not identify the performance of



semielective surgery after initial endoscopic decompression to pro-

tect against mortality. It may be the case in which this effect may be

masked by other factors that have a higher impact on mortality. Delay-

ing surgery after successful colonoscopic decompression to correct

underlying fluid and electrolyte imbalance has been found to de-

crease mortality rates.

60

The effect of fluid and electrolyte imbalance



on mortality rates was not very pronounced.

The presence of bowel gangrene and peritonitis was a strong

predictor of mortality from cecal volvulus and sigmoid volvulus. In

sigmoid volvulus, this finding alone doubled mortality rates. This was

also seen for cecal volvulus cases to a lower extent. These finding

echo findings from smaller observational studies

6,24,25,43,52,60,62,79,80

;

however, most of these studies were small and did not achieve sta-



tistical significance. The use of stoma was also found as a predictor

of mortality; however, this could be a surrogate to bowel gangrene

and peritonitis. Coagulopathy was another strong predictor of mor-

tality. The definition of coagulopathy in NIS includes the presence

of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy that occurs in the setting

of sepsis and septic shock. This suggests that prompt management

is essential in the management of colonic volvulus.

65

The effect of



age on mortality was less pronounced in sigmoid volvulus than in

cecal volvulus. Again, this is in line with previous findings that noted

higher mortality rates for sigmoid volvulus in patients older than 70

years.


59,79,81

The AUC of the ROC for both sigmoid and cecal volvu-

lus groups reflected good predictive power, and the 10-fold cross-

validation performed ensures that these models can be generalized

beyond the sample analyzed.

The main limitation of this study lies in its retrospective nature

and its inherent biases. The potential for coding errors exist when

using an administrative database.

82

The incidence of volvulus could



be slightly underestimated as we excluded patients who died before

surgery and the rare cases that may have detorsed spontaneously as

previously reported.

13,64,69,79,83

One ICD-9 diagnosis code for colonic

volvulus exists and hence differentiation between cecal volvulus and

sigmoid volvulus in cases of operative detorsion or fixation was not

possible. Mortality rates could be higher than observed, as the NIS

only provides information related to the index hospital stay and hence

30-day mortality and mortality rates are not available. Because each

record in NIS is for a single hospitalization, there could be multi-

ple records for an individual if that individual had several hospital-

izations. This would affect the number of admissions for sigmoid

volvulus that may recur after nondefinitive treatment. The inability

to track individual cases did not allow us to calculate recurrence

rates for sigmoid volvulus cases that underwent initial endoscopic

decompression.



Yüklə 248,72 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə