On the causes of persistent apical periodontitis



Yüklə 337,83 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/5
tarix19.03.2017
ölçüsü337,83 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5

REVIEW

On the causes of persistent apical periodontitis:

a review

P. N. R. Nair

Institute of Oral Biology, Section of Oral Structures and Development, Centre of Dental and Oral Medicine, University of Zurich,

Zurich, Switzerland

Abstract

Nair PNR.

On the causes of persistent apical periodontitis: a

review. International Endodontic Journal, 39, 249–281, 2006.

Apical periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder

of periradicular tissues caused by aetiological agents of

endodontic origin. Persistent apical periodontitis occurs

when root canal treatment of apical periodontitis has

not adequately eliminated intraradicular infection.

Problems that lead to persistent apical periodontitis

include: inadequate aseptic control, poor access cavity

design, missed canals, inadequate instrumentation,

debridement and leaking temporary or permanent

restorations. Even when the most stringent procedures

are followed, apical periodontitis may still persist as

asymptomatic radiolucencies, because of the complex-

ity of the root canal system formed by the main and

accessory canals, their ramifications and anastomoses

where residual infection can persist. Further, there are

extraradicular factors – located within the inflamed

periapical tissue – that can interfere with post-treat-

ment healing of apical periodontitis. The causes of

apical periodontitis persisting after root canal treatment

have not been well characterized. During the 1990s, a

series of investigations have shown that there are six

biological factors that lead to asymptomatic radiolu-

cencies persisting after root canal treatment. These are:

(i) intraradicular infection persisting in the complex

apical root canal system; (ii) extraradicular infection,

generally in the form of periapical actinomycosis; (iii)

extruded root canal filling or other exogenous materials

that cause a foreign body reaction; (iv) accumulation of

endogenous cholesterol crystals that irritate periapical

tissues; (v) true cystic lesions, and (vi) scar tissue

healing of the lesion. This article provides a compre-

hensive


overview

of

the



causative

factors


of

non-resolving periapical lesions that are seen as

asymptomatic radiolucencies post-treatment.

Keywords: aetiology, endodontic failures, persistent

apical radiolucency, non-healing apical periodontitis,

refractory periapical lesions, persistent apical periodon-

titis.

Received 27 September 2005; accepted 24 November 2005



Introduction

Apical periodontitis is an inflammatory disorder of

periradicular tissues caused by persistent microbial

infection within the root canal system of the affected

tooth (Kakehashi et al. 1965, Sundqvist 1976). The

infected and necrotic pulp offers a selective habitat for

the organisms (Fabricius et al. 1982b). The microbes

grow in sessile biofilms, aggregates, coaggregates, and

also as planktonic cells suspended in the fluid phase of

the canal (Nair 1987). A biofilm (Costerton et al. 2003)

is a community of microorganisms embedded in an

exopolysaccharide matrix that adheres onto a moist

surface whereas planktonic organisms are free-floating

single microbial cells in an aqueous environment.

Correspondence: Dr P. N. R. Nair, Institute of Oral Biology,

Section of Oral Structures and Development (OSD), Centre of

Dental & Oral Medicine, University of Zurich, Plattenstrasse

11, CH-8028 Zurich, Switzerland (Tel.: +41 44 634 31 42;

fax: +41 44 312 32 81; e-mail: nair@zzmk.unizh.ch).

ª 2006 International Endodontic Journal

International Endodontic Journal, 39, 249–281, 2006

249


Microorganisms protected in biofilms are greater than

one thousand times more resistant to biocides as the

same organisms in planktonic form (Wilson 1996,

Costerton & Stewart 2000).

There is consensus that apical periodontitis persisting

after root canal treatment presents a more complex

aetiological and therapeutic situation than apical

periodontitis affecting teeth that have not undergone

endodontic treatment. The aetiological spectrum and

treatment options of persistent apical periodontitis are

broader than those of teeth that have not undergone

previous root canal treatment. Further, the process of

decision-making regarding the management of persist-

ent apical periodontitis is more complex and less

uniform among clinicians than in the management of

apical periodontitis affecting non-treated teeth (Fried-

man 2003). For optimum clinical management of the

disease a clear understanding of the aetiology and

pathogenesis of the disease is essential. Therefore, the

purpose of this communication is to provide a compre-

hensive overview of the causes and maintenance of

persistent apical periodontitis that is radiographically

visualized as periapical radiolucencies which are often

asymptomatic.

Intraradicular microorganisms being the essential

aetiological agents of apical periodontitis (Kakehashi

et al. 1965, Sundqvist 1976), the treatment of the

disease consists of eradicating the root canal microbes

or substantially reducing the microbial load and

preventing re-infection by root canal filling (Nair et al.

2005). When the treatment is done properly, healing

of the periapical lesion usually occurs with hard tissue

regeneration, that is characterized by reduction of the

radiolucency on follow-up radiographs (Strindberg

1956,

Grahne´n


&

Hansson 1961,

Seltzer

et al.


1963,

Storms


1969,

Molven


1976,

Kerekes


&

Tronstad 1979, Molven & Halse 1988, Sjo¨gren et al.

1990, 1997, Sundqvist et al. 1998). Nevertheless, a

complete healing of calcified tissues or reduction of the

apical radiolucency does not occur in all root canal-

treated teeth. Such cases of non-resolving periapical

radiolucencies are also referred to as endodontic

failures. Periapical radiolucencies persist when treat-

ment procedures have not reached a satisfactory

standard for the control and elimination of infection.

Inadequate aseptic control, poor access cavity design,

missed canals, insufficient instrumentation, and leak-

ing temporary or permanent restorations are common

problems that may lead to persistent apical periodon-

titis (Sundqvist & Figdor 1998). Even when the most

careful clinical procedures are followed, a proportion

of lesions may persist radiographically, because of the

anatomical complexity of the root canal system (Hess

1921, Perrini & Castagnola 1998) with regions that

cannot be debrided and obturated with existing

instruments, materials and techniques (Nair et al.

2005). In addition, there are factors located beyond

the root canal system, within the inflamed periapical

tissue, that can interfere with post-treatment healing

of the lesion (Nair & Schroeder 1984, Sjo¨gren et al.

1988, Figdor et al. 1992, Nair et al. 1999, Nair

2003a,b).

Microbial causes

Intraradicular infection

Microscopical

examination

of

periapical



tissues

removed by surgery has long been a method to detect

potential causative agents of persistent apical perio-

dontitis. Early investigations (Seltzer et al. 1967, And-

reasen & Rud 1972, Block et al. 1976, Langeland et al.

1977, Lin et al. 1991) of apical biopsies had several

limitations such as the use of unsuitable specimens,

inappropriate methodology and criteria of analysis.

Therefore, these studies did not yield relevant informa-

tion about the reasons for apical periodontitis persisting

as asymptomatic radiolucencies even after proper root

canal treatment.

In one histological analysis (Seltzer et al. 1967) of

persistent apical periodontitis, there was not even a

mention of residual microbial infection of the root canal

system as a potential cause of the lesions remaining

unhealed. A histobacteriological study (Andreasen &

Rud 1972) using step-serial sectioning and special

bacterial stains, found bacteria in the root canals of

14% of the 66 specimens examined. Two other studies

(Block et al. 1976, Langeland et al. 1977) analysed

230 and 35 periapical surgical specimens, respectively,

by routine paraffin histology. Although bacteria were

found in 10% and 15% of the respective biopsies, only

in a single specimen in each study was intraradicular

infection detected. In the remaining biopsies in which

bacteria were found, the data also included those

specimens in which bacteria were found as ‘contami-

nants on the surface of the tissue’. In yet another study

(Lin et al. 1991) ‘bacteria and or debris’ was found in

the root canals of 63% of the 86 endodontic surgical

specimens, although it is obvious that ‘bacteria and

debris’ cannot be equated as potential causative agents.

The low reported incidence of intraradicular infections

in these studies is primarily due to a methodological

Persistent apical periodontitis Nair

International Endodontic Journal, 39, 249–281, 2006

ª 2006 International Endodontic Journal

250


inadequacy as microorganisms easily go undetected

when the investigations are based on random paraffin

sections alone. This has been convincingly demonstra-

ted (Nair 1987, Nair et al. 1990a). Consequently,

historic studies on post-treatment apical periodontitis

did not consider residual intraradicular infection as an

aetiological causative factor.

In order to identify the aetiological agents of asymp-

tomatic persistent apical periodontitis by microscopy, the

cases must be selected from teeth that have had the best

possible root canal treatment and the radiographic

lesions remain asymptomatic until surgical intervention.

The specimens must be anatomically intact block-

biopsies that include the apical portion of the roots and

the inflamed soft tissue of the lesions. Such specimens

should undergo meticulous investigation by serial or

step-serial sections that are analysed using correlative

light and transmission electron microscopy. A study that

met these criteria and also included microbial monitor-

ing before and during treatment (Nair et al. 1990a)

revealed intraradicular microorganisms in six of the nine

block biopsies (Fig. 1). The finding showed that the

majority of root canal-treated teeth with asymptomatic

apical periodontitis harboured persistent infection in the

apical portion of the complex root canal system. How-

ever, the proportion of cases with persistent apical

periodontitis having intraradicular infection is likely to

be much higher in routine endodontic practice than the

two-thirds of the nine cases reported (Nair et al. 1990a)

for several reasons. At the light microscopic level it was

possible to detect bacteria in only one of the six cases

(Nair et al. 1990a). Microorganisms were found as a

biofilm located within the small canals of apical ramifi-

cations (Fig. 1) in the root canal or in the space between

the root fillings and canal wall. This demonstrates the

inadequacy of conventional paraffin techniques to detect

infections in apical biopsies.

The microbial status of apical root canal systems

immediately after non-surgical root canal treatment was

unknown. However, in a recent study (Nair et al. 2005),

14 of the 16 root filled mandibular molars contained

residual infection in mesial roots when the treatment

was completed in one-visit and includes instrumenta-

tion, irrigation with NaOCl and filling. The infectious

agents were mostly located in the uninstrumented

recesses of the main canals, isthmuses communicating

them and accessory canals. The microbes in such

untouched locations existed primarily as biofilms that

were not removed by instrumentation and irrigation

with NaOCl. In view of the great anatomical complexity

of the root canal system, particularly of molars (Hess

1921, Perrini & Castagnola 1998) and the ecological

organization of the flora into protected sessile biofilms

(Costerton & Stewart 2000, Costerton et al. 2003)

composed of microbial cells embedded in a hydrated

exopolysaccharide-complex in micro-colonies (Nair

1987), it is very unlikely that an absolutely microor-

ganism-free canal-system can be achieved by any of the

contemporary root canal preparation, cleaning and root

filling procedures. Then, the question arises as to why a

large number of apical lesions heal after non-surgical

root canal treatment. Some periapical lesions heal even

when infection persists in the canals at the time of root

filling (Sjo¨gren et al. 1997). Although this may imply

that the organisms may not survive post-treatment, it is

more likely that the microbes may be present in

quantities and virulence that may be sub-critical to

sustain the inflammation of the periapex (Nair et al.

2005). In some cases such residual microbes can delay or

prevent periapical healing as was the case with six of the

nine biopsies studied and reported (Nair et al. 1990a).

On the basis of cell wall ultrastructure only Gram-

positive bacteria were found (Nair et al. 1990a)

(Fig. 2), an observation fully in agreement with the

results of purely microbiological investigations of root

canals of previously root filled teeth with persisting

periapical lesions. Of the six specimens that contained

intraradicular infections, four had one or more mor-

phologically distinct types of bacteria and two revealed

yeasts (Fig. 3). The presence of intracanal fungi in root-

treated teeth with apical periodontitis was also con-

firmed by microbiological techniques (Waltimo et al.

1997, Peciuliene et al. 2001). These findings clearly

associate intraradicular fungi as a potential non-bacter-

ial, microbial cause of persistent apical lesions. Intra-

radicular

infection

can


also

remain


within

the


innermost portions of infected dentinal tubules to serve

as a reservoir for endodontic reinfection that might

interfere with periapical healing (Shovelton 1964,

Valderhaug 1974, Nagaoka et al. 1995, Peters et al.

1995, Love et al. 1997, Love & Jenkinson 2002).

Microbial flora of root canal-treated teeth

The endodontic microbiology of treated teeth is less

understood than that of untreated infected necrotic

dental pulps. This has been suggested to be a conse-

quence of searching for non-microbial causes of a

purely technical nature for lesions persistent after root

canal treatments (Sundqvist & Figdor 1998). Only a

small number of species has been found in the root

canals of teeth that have undergone proper endodontic

treatment that, on follow-up, revealed persisting,

Nair Persistent apical periodontitis

ª 2006 International Endodontic Journal

International Endodontic Journal, 39, 249–281, 2006

251


Figure 1

Light microscopic view of axial semithin sections through the surgically removed apical portion of the root with a

persistent apical periodontitis. Note the adhesive biofilm (BF) in the root canal. Consecutive sections (a, b) reveal the emerging

widened profile of an accessory canal (AC) that is clogged with the biofilm. The AC and the biofilm are magnified in (c) and (d)

respectively. Magnifications: (a)

·75, (b) ·70, (c) ·110, (d) ·300. Adapted from Nair et al. (1990a).

Persistent apical periodontitis Nair

International Endodontic Journal, 39, 249–281, 2006

ª 2006 International Endodontic Journal

252


asymptomatic periapical radiolucencies. The bacteria

found in these cases are predominantly Gram-positive

cocci, rods and filaments. By culture-based techniques,

species belonging to the genera Actinomyces, Enter-

ococcus and Propionibacterium (previously Arachnia)

are frequently isolated and characterized from such

root canals (Mo¨ller 1966, Sundqvist & Reuterving

1980,


Happonen

1986,


Sjo¨gren

et al.


1988,

Figure 2


Transmission electron microscopic view of the biofilm (BA upper inset) illustrated in Fig. 1. Morphologically the bacterial

population appears to be composed of only Gram-positive, filamentous organisms (arrowhead in lower inset). Note the distinctive

Gram-positive cell wall. The upper inset is a light microscopic view of the biofilm (BA). Magnifications:

·3400; insets: upper ·135,

lower

·21 300. From Nair et al. (1990a). Printed with permission from Lippincott Williams & Wilkins



Ò

.

Nair Persistent apical periodontitis



ª 2006 International Endodontic Journal

International Endodontic Journal, 39, 249–281, 2006

253


Figure 3

Fungi as a potential cause of non-healed apical periodontitis. (a) Low-power view of an axial section of a root-filled (RF)

tooth with a persistent apical periodontitis (GR). The rectangular demarcated areas in (a) and (d) are magnified in (d) and (b),

respectively. Note the two microbial clusters (arrowheads in b) further magnified in (c). The oval inset in (d) is a transmission

electron microscopic view of the organisms. Note the electron-lucent cell wall (CW), nuclei (N) and budding forms (BU). Original

magnifications: (a)

·35, (b) ·130, (c) ·330, (d) ·60, oval inset ·3400. Adapted from Nair et al. (1990a). Printed with permission

from Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

ª

.

Persistent apical periodontitis Nair



International Endodontic Journal, 39, 249–281, 2006

ª 2006 International Endodontic Journal

254


Fukushima

et al.


1990,

Molander


et al.

1998,


Sundqvist et al. 1998, Hancock et al. 2001, Pinheiro

et al. 2003). The presence of Enterococcus faecalis in

cases of persistent apical periodontitis is of particular

interest because it is rarely found in infected but

untreated root canals (Sundqvist & Figdor 1998).

Enterococcus faecalis is the most consistently reported

organism from such former cases, with a prevalence

ranging from 22% to 77% of cases analysed (Mo¨ller

1966, Molander et al. 1998, Sundqvist et al. 1998,

Peciuliene et al. 2000, Hancock et al. 2001, Pinheiro

et al. 2003, Siqueira & Roˆc¸as 2004, Fouad et al. 2005).

The organism is resistant to most of the intracanal

medicaments, and can tolerate (Bystro¨m et al. 1985) a

pH up to 11.5, which may be one reason why this

organism survives antimicrobial treatment with cal-

cium hydroxide dressings. This resistance occurs prob-

ably by virtue of its ability to regulate internal pH with

an efficient proton pump (Evans et al. 2002). Entero-

coccus faecalis can survive prolonged starvation (Figdor

et al. 2003). It can grow as monoinfection in treated

canals in the absence of synergistic support from other

bacteria (Fabricius et al. 1982a). Therefore, E. faecalis is

regarded as being a very recalcitrant microbe among

the potential aetiological agents of persistent apical

periodontitis. However, the presence of E. faecalis in

cases of persistent apical periodontitis is not a universal

observation. This is because one microbial culture

(Cheung & Ho 2001) and a molecular based (Rolph

et al. 2001) study, in which the presence of E. faecalis in

such cases was investigated, failed to detect the

organism. Further, the prevalence of E. faecalis was

found to be 22% and 77%, respectively, of cases

analysed by two molecular techniques (Siqueira &

Roˆc¸as 2004, Fouad et al. 2005). In this context the

long reported correlation between the prevalence of

enterococci in root canals of primary and retreatment

cases and that in other oral sites, such as gingival sulcus

and tonsils, of the same patients, is worth noting

(Engstro¨m 1964). The enterococci may be opportunistic

organisms that populate exposed root filled canals from

elsewhere in the mouth (Fouad et al. 2005). Therefore,

in spite of the current focus of attention, it still remains

to be shown, in controlled studies, that E. faecalis is the

pathogen of significance in most cases of non-healing

apical lesions after endodontic treatment (Nair 2004).

Microbiological (Mo¨ller 1966, Waltimo et al. 1997)

and correlative electron microscopic (Nair et al. 1990a)

studies have shown the presence of yeasts (Fig. 3)

in canals of root filled teeth with unresolved apical

periodontitis. Candida albicans is the most frequently

isolated fungus from root filled teeth with apical perio-

dontitis (Molander et al. 1998, Sundqvist et al. 1998).

Extraradicular infection

Actinomycosis

Actinomycosis is a chronic, granulomatous, infectious

disease in humans and animals caused by the genera

Actinomyces

and


Propionibacterium

(McGhee


et al.

1982). The aetiological agent of bovine actinomycosis,

Actinomyces bovis, was the first species to be identified

(Harz 1879). The disease in cattle, known as ‘lumpy

jaw’ or ‘big head disease’, is characterized by extensive

bone rarefaction, swelling of the jaw, suppuration and

fistulation. The causative agents were described as non-

acid fast, non-motile, Gram-positive organisms reveal-

ing characteristic branching filaments that end in clubs

or hyphae. Because of the morphological appearance

these organisms were considered fungi and the taxon-

omy of Actinomyces remained controversial for more

than a century. The intertwining filamentous colonies

are often called ‘sulphur granules’ because of their

appearance as yellow specks in exudates. On careful



Yüklə 337,83 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə