Paper Title (use style: paper title)



Yüklə 238,96 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/5
tarix02.01.2022
ölçüsü238,96 Kb.
#38104
  1   2   3   4   5
1.Lecture-1 translation


 

The Presentation of Self in Henry James‟s “Daisy 

Miller” 

 

Shufen Huang 



Foreign Language and Trade Department 

Qingyuan Polytechnic 

Qingyuan, China 

 

 



Abstract

—Henry  James’s  novella  “Daisy  Miller”  was 

traditionally regarded as an international and cultural story and 

the common criticism was on its cultural theme. In this article, I 

have employed the theory of self-presentation to re-consider the 

self-hood of its characters and its influences on the interpersonal 

and intercultural relations. 

Keywords—Henry James; Daisy Miller; self-presentation 

I. 


 

I

NTRODUCTION



 

Henry James (1843-1916) is generally acknowledged to be 

one of America‟s greatest novelists and critics. He is the author 

of  some  of  the  best-known  fictions  of  the  later  nineteenth 

century  —  stories  like  “Daisy  Miller”  (1876),  novels  like 

Portrait  of  a  Lady  (1881),  tales  like  The  Turn  of  the  Screw 

(1898). According to Linda Simon‟s research, from the 1980s 

to  2007,  we  can  see  a  flourishing  James  industry  as  scholars 

have brought new critical perspectives to bear on James‟s work 

by  examining  them  in  the  light of  New  Historicism,  feminist 

and queer theory, cultural studies, and both psychological and 

philosophical studies of consciousness [1]. “Daisy Miller,” first 

published  in  the  June  and  July  1878  issues  of  the  British 

magazine  Cornhill,  transformed  James  into  an  author  of 

international standing. The novella‟s popularity aroused a great 

deal  of  criticism  on  its  theme  and  the  author.  Critics  were 

universally  concerned  about  its  international  theme  and  the 

cultural conflicts. However, “Daisy Miller” as a dramatic and 

interesting  story  receives  no  study  about  self-presentation  in 

the cultural context. In this article, I would like to employ the 

theory  of  self-presentation  to  re-consider  the  self-hood  of  the 

characters  in  James‟  novella,  particularly  Winterbourne  and 

Daisy, and its influences on the interpersonal and intercultural 

relations.  

II.  S

ELF AND 


S

ELF


-

PRESENTATION

 

A.  Self 

Before  the  adaptation  of  the  theory  of  self-presentation,  I 

would  like  to  clarify  the  self  and  the  theory  framework  I  am 

going to use. The study of self has many sides and subtopics: 

self-awareness, self-monitoring, self-esteem, self-enhancement, 

self-presentation,  and  more.  In  fact  the  term  “self”  was 

commonly  used  by  everyone  with  ease  and  familiarity.  This 

suggests that the concept of selfhood is rooted in some simple 

and universal human experience. The human selfhood depends 

on  the capacity  for  reflexive consciousness,  which  means  the 

human mind is able to turn attention toward itself and construct 

extensive  knowledge  of  itself.  As  times  went  by,  Baumeister 

indicated  that  the  psychology  of  self  has  expanded  and 

flourished  over  decades  while  the  concept  of  selfhood  is 

changed  “from  the  straightforward  and  untroubled  to  the 

complex and  conflicted”  [2]. Though  self-knowledge remains 

incomplete  and  depends  on  inference,  the  topic  of  self-

awareness is generally popular. As the study of self develops, 

psychologists  found  that  people  change  their  behavior  when 

others are watching, in order to make an impression on those 

others. Self-presentation, like most forms of social interaction, 

becomes an important step in the process of building the inner 

self and continues to be critical in the study of self.  

B.  Self-presentation  

The term “self-presentation” was first introduced by Erving 

Goffman in 1959 as part of a broader depiction of human social 

life  as  theatre:  people  play  roles,  follow  scripts,  tailor  their 

performances  to  the  audience,  and  change  their  behavior 

“backstage” [3]. The self presents itself differently according to 

the  context.  The  inner  self  is  well  shaped  by  social 

communication  and  social  interaction.  Goffman‟s  outstanding 

contribution to the theory of self-rests upon his approach to the 

core of individual identity is from the everyday-life situations 

of  face-to-face  encounters.  The  self  is  far  from  a  passive 

accepter  of  feedback.  Instead,  the  self  actively  processes  and 

selects  and  sometimes  distorts  information  from  the  social 

world.  Goffman‟s  notion  of  self,  as  Srinivasan  named  it,  has 

been  the  subject  of  intense  debate  primarily  because  of  the 

perspective  of  incongruity”  that  he  introduced  as  the 



hallmark  of  the  “Goffmanesque  touch”  [4].  As  Goffman‟s 

concern  is  restricted  into  the  domain  of  Anglo-American 

society,  whether  we  can  use  his  framework  to  unfold  the 

analysis  of  “Daisy  Miller”,  a  novel  about  “international 

theme,” becomes a question. The questions of cross-cultural 

interaction  and  relation  are  beyond  Goffman.  By  recognizing 

such limitations in his theory, the concept of self-presentation I 

would  like  to  use  here  points  to  the  presentation  of  selfhood 

with  a  clear  idea  about  what  people  know  and  believe  about 

themselves. Meanwhile, Goffman‟s theory of self-presentation 

is  universalized  into  a  cross-cultural  scope  with  the  aid  of 

cross-cultural references.  

2nd International Conference on Art Studies: Science, Experience, Education (ICASSEE 2018)

Copyright © 2018, the Authors. Published by Atlantis Press. 

This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). 

Advances in Social Science, Education and Humanities Research, volume 284

200



 

III.  W


INTERBOURNE



S

ELF


-

PRESENTATION

 

“Daisy  Miller”  has  been  regarded  as  an  “international 



novel,” but it is also a theme that absorbs James throughout his 

career:  the  phenomenon  of  understanding  oneself  and  others. 

“Daisy Miller” is, as many critics observed, the adventure and 

the failure of Winterbourne‟s attempt to figure out Daisy Miller. 

In a sense, “Daisy Miller” is a fiction of manners. Throughout 

the  whole  novella, the  characters, Winterbourne and  Daisy  in 

particular,  are  presenting  their  selves  according  to  the 

circumstances  and  contexts,  though  both  of  whom  fail  to 

“embrace” the roles and lead to undesirable consequences. 

It has been argued that “Daisy Miller” is really more about 

Winterbourne than Daisy herself. In many ways, Winterbourne 

is  as  central  as  Daisy  and  may  very  well  be  the  story‟s  true 

protagonist.  It  is  a  story  presenting  Winterbourne ’ s 

presentation  of  his  roles  in  the  theatre  of  life.  An  American 

who has lived most of his life in Europe, Winterbourne is the 

type of Europeanized expatriate. He is closely associated with 

Calvinism in Geneva, “the dark old city at the other end of the 

lake”.  He  has  an  aunt,  Mrs.  Costello,  from  a  high  society 

knowing “many of the secrets of that social sway”.  

In the novella, Winterbourne in general plays the roles as a 

stranger,  a  nephew,  and  a  friend  in  different  encounters  and 

contexts.  




Yüklə 238,96 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə