Publisher: Routledge



Yüklə 198,46 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix26.11.2019
ölçüsü198,46 Kb.
#29702
Work Integration of disabilities


This article was downloaded by: [University of Waterloo]

On: 16 December 2014, At: 07:02

Publisher: Routledge

Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House,

37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability

Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information:

http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/cjid20

Work integration of people with disabilities in the

regular labour market: What can we do to improve

these processes?

Montserrat Vilà

a

, Maria Pallisera



a

 & Judit Fullana

a

a

 University of Girona, Spain



Published online: 30 Jan 2014.

To cite this article: Montserrat Vilà, Maria Pallisera & Judit Fullana (2007) Work integration of people with disabilities in the

regular labour market: What can we do to improve these processes?, Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability,

32:1, 10-18

To link to this article:  

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13668250701196807

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE

Taylor & Francis makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of all the information (the “Content”) contained

in the publications on our platform. However, Taylor & Francis, our agents, and our licensors make no

representations or warranties whatsoever as to the accuracy, completeness, or suitability for any purpose of the

Content. Any opinions and views expressed in this publication are the opinions and views of the authors, and

are not the views of or endorsed by Taylor & Francis. The accuracy of the Content should not be relied upon and

should be independently verified with primary sources of information. Taylor and Francis shall not be liable for

any losses, actions, claims, proceedings, demands, costs, expenses, damages, and other liabilities whatsoever

or howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly in connection with, in relation to or arising out of the use of

the Content.

This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes. Any substantial or systematic

reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any

form to anyone is expressly forbidden. Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found at 

http://


www.tandfonline.com/page/terms-and-conditions

Work integration of people with disabilities in the regular labour

market: What can we do to improve these processes?

MONTSERRAT VILA

` , MARIA PALLISERA & JUDIT FULLANA

University of Girona, Spain

Abstract


Background It is important to ensure that regular processes of labour market integration are available for all citizens.

Method Thematic content analysis techniques, using semi-structured group interviews, were used to identify the principal

elements contributing to the processes of integrating people with disabilities into the regular labour market. Thirty-two

professionals from 17 agencies provided information regarding the role of the family, training, workplace monitoring, the

work setting, and personal resources of the worker.

Results The results indicated that family, training (prior to and during the integration service), monitoring of the worker in the

workplace, and work setting were relevant and contributing aspects of the process of work integration.

Conclusions A real and effective commitment on the part of the government is required to regulate and provide resources to

create supported employment services and to allow these services to plan their own interventions, keeping in mind the

relevance of and relationship between aspects such as family, training, workplace monitoring, the work setting and personal

resources of the worker.

Keywords: Work integration, supported employment, persons with disabilities, disability

Introduction

Supported employment began in the 1980s in the USA

(Wehman, 1981, 1992a, 1992b), from where it

spread to Canada, and progressively to other western

countries where the culture of integration is more

deeply rooted. Supported employment includes the

following processes: offering training activities to

groups with special difficulties in order to achieve

work integration; searching the labour market to

identify places of work; and carrying out placement

and monitoring at the workplace to help people with

disabilities learn all that will help them to develop

appropriately in their positions. This model uses

training strategies, professional analysis of the work-

place, and on-the-job training to facilitate integra-

tion, and offers the necessary help to both workers

with disabilities and the work settings which employ

them.


In European countries, supported employment

coexists with programs or ‘‘traditional’’ services of

sheltered employment, which offer work to people

with disabilities in specific settings. Bellver (2001)

and Saloviita (2000) provided data about the

introduction of supported employment in Europe

during the 1990s. The introduction and consolida-

tion of this kind of program is conditioned by,

among other factors, the system of relations that is

set up between the sheltered sector and such

programs, and by the State’s social services policy.

Bellver has suggested that in most countries, the

introduction of supported employment strategies is a

difficult process, above all due to the fact that

it represents a radical change – from a cultural,

methodological and political point of view – away

from the traditional model of sheltered employment.

Pallisera, Vila`, and Valls (2003) discussed in

depth the evolution of services aimed at facilitating

work integration of people with disabilities in Spain.

During the 1990s, supported employment started to

slowly emerge as an alternative to sheltered employ-

ment and provided a means of work integration of

people with disabilities in the regular labour market.

Verdugo, Jorda´n, Bellver, and Martı´nez (1998)

analysed the progressive introduction of supported

employment in the Spanish setting, and presented a

quantitative study of the programs that existed until

1988 in Spain, as well as of the users who had

benefited from their services. Updated data on

programs, the numbers served, and characteristics

Correspondence: Montserrat Vila`, Department of Educational Studies, University of Girona, C/ Emili Grahit, 77, Girona, Spain. E-mail:

montserrat.vila@udg.es

Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, March 2007; 32(1): 10–18

ISSN 1366-8250 print/ISSN 1469-9532 online 2007 Australasian Society for the Study of Intellectual Disability Inc.

DOI: 10.1080/13668250701196807

Downloaded by [University of Waterloo] at 07:02 16 December 2014 


of supported employment in Spain can be found in

Jorda´n and Verdugo (2003) and Pallisera, Vila`,

Valls, Rius, et al. (2003).

The number of sheltered employment services and

the number of people using them increased between

the 1980s and 2000. Although this is a trend that can

be observed in most western countries (Visier,

2000), the growth in Spain has been really specta-

cular, as the sheltered sector has practically doubled

in 10 years. This increase in the number of places in

sheltered centres has been at the expense of fulfilling

the aims of supported employment services.

In Spain, supported employment has developed

considerably more slowly than in other European

countries, and it still lacks the legal recognition that

would give it a significant impulse by setting up clear

channels for its funding. At the moment, supported

employment is developing from very diverse profes-

sional initiatives, with programs being integrated

into the network of social services for people with

disabilities.

In Spain, supported employment is clearly in a

consolidation phase, but it is also true that the

growth of these services has not been accompanied

by studies that would allow us to find out which

dimensions or factors favour the integration process

of people with disabilities into the regular labour

market. There have been few studies that have

focused on the development of integration processes

or on obtaining data about the influence that various

factors may have on the nature of these processes. As

we

have



stated

in

previous



articles

(Fullana,

Pallisera, & Vila`, 2003), few studies have been

carried out using qualitative methodology that

would provide a global and comprehensive view of

the reality and an in-depth analysis of the diverse

elements involved in the process. Such an analysis is

necessary to be able to propose guidelines that will

enable the work integration processes of people with

disabilities in regular settings to be improved

qualitatively and quantitatively.

The outlook for research on the subject has begun

to change recently as several research projects have

been carried out to ascertain which factors play a

decisive role in the development of integration

processes. Here we must highlight the contributions

made by Jorda´n and Verdugo (2003), Alomar

(2004), Serra (2004) and Rius (2005).

Our research team has also been working on

several studies, and their results provide important

clues to understanding the work integration pro-

cesses implemented using supported employment

strategies (Pallisera & Vila`, 2001; Research Group

on Diversity, 2000a, 2000b, 2004). These studies

give us information about the development of work

integration processes. The role of the family, the

legal framework of the labour setting, as well as

training of workers with disabilities, are mentioned

as support factors that, among others, seem to

clearly influence the success of the integration

process. Based on the results of these studies, the

following questions arise which require further

investigation: What impact does the labour context

(type of company, labour legislation of the sector,

etc.) have on the success of the integration process?

On which components should training be focused in

order to have a positive influence on integration?

What relationship should be established between the

family and the integration service to generate

processes that facilitate continuity of integration?

And what are the conditions for monitoring the work

setting which will help to facilitate these processes?

To delve deeper into these issues, we carried out

the research presented in this article.

A case study of the factors that favour the work

integration processes of people with disabilities

The aim of this study was to identify and analyse

how different factors related to family, work and

training, interact to influence work integration by

means of supported employment. This research was

carried out in Catalonia (Spain).

Method


In line with previous studies by our research group,

we used a qualitative approach in order to reach a

global understanding of work integration processes

in ordinary settings. In our previous work, job

trainers formed a very large group of informants,

alongside workers, family, and personnel directors of

companies that hire people with disabilities. The

research we present here extends our previous work

and focuses attention on a greater number of

professionals from supported employment services

in Catalonia, a region in North-East Spain. This

methodological approach brings us closer to under-

standing the development of the experiences of

supported employment from a professional position,

based on the impressions and statements of those

who are actively involved.

All the participants took part voluntarily in the

study, and each provided written consent. Nobody

was obliged to answer any question they did not

want to. In Spain, no ethics committees exist to

review projects in the field of educational research,

so this study was not subject to formal ethics review.

We chose to carry out semi-structured group

interviews with a group interview guide to contrast

Work integration of people with disabilities

11

Downloaded by [University of Waterloo] at 07:02 16 December 2014 



the findings of our studies with the experiences and

opinions of supported employment professionals. In

this kind of interview, usually called a ‘‘focus group

interview’’, a considerable amount of research

concerning a particular topic is needed before the

interviewer asks the group specific questions related

to it. In this context, the group interview can be used

for


data

triangulation,

among

other


strategies

(Fontana & Frey, 1998).

Following Fontana and Frey (1998) and de Ruiz

Olabue´naga and Ispizua (1989), group interviews

were used to contrast and verify, as required, the

conclusions of previous studies in order to set out

some trend factors (i.e., to identify elements that

repeatedly appear in accounts of integration and that

clearly influence the process aimed at ensuring

successful integration). The interview was structured

around five main themes: family, prior training of

the worker, training by the supported employment

service, workplace monitoring, and the work setting

of the person (see Table 1). Questions were asked on

each theme and the answers enabled us to gain a

deeper insight into existing problems surrounding

these services, and to find out the opinion of

professionals regarding which factors need to be

kept in mind to promote positive work integration

processes.

A total of 18 services, all of which were operating

between 1995 and 2000, took part in the research

project. The 18 services are highly diverse, with

regard to both the specific features of their opera-

tion, and the groups to which their training and

integration efforts are directed. As far as the

characteristics of the people served are concerned,

most agencies provide services to people with

intellectual disability; however some agencies also

provide services to people with physical disabilities

or mental illness. Table 2 shows the characteristics of

the different services, as well as the number of

people interviewed from each one.

Interviews were held at the service itself. Each

interview lasted for 2hours, was recorded, and

then transcribed in its entirety. Notes were taken on

the context of each service during the interview and

borne in mind when the interview was analysed.

These contextual aspects were: disability types,

social and cultural characteristics of the recipients,

dominant employment sector in the area, and extent

of experience of professionals working with people

with disabilities, and more specifically, working with

supported employment services.

The data were analysed using thematic content

analysis techniques. The interview guideline was

also used as a structure to follow when analysing

data. From each interview, we extracted all verbal

comments and statements relating to each of the

factors considered: family, training, monitoring,

work setting and worker’s personal resources,

Table 1. Group interview guide

(1) Family

The role of family support

Family expectations

Aspects that must be ensured in the family to contribute to the work integration processes

(2) Training

Prior training

N

The role of compulsory basic training



N

Basic knowledge that facilitates work integration

N

Type of institution (special centre versus ordinary centre) and its role in training for adult life and for the development of a working life



Training by the supported employment service

N

Role of previous training in the integration process



N

Training aspects to ensure the continuity of the integration process

(3) Workplace monitoring

How important is monitoring for the success of integration?

Monitoring characteristics: time course and intensity

How to organise accompanying processes for the successful functioning of integration

(4) Work setting

Current legislation:

N

Elements from the current legal framework that favour the continuity of integration



N

Elements that make integration difficult

N

Necessary improvements in the legal framework



Assessment of the economic advantages or benefits of contracting people with disabilities

Attitudes in the work setting

Aspects to promote in the work setting to guarantee the continuity of the integration processes

12

M. Vila` et al.



Downloaded by [University of Waterloo] at 07:02 16 December 2014 

noting any instances where the perceptions and

points of view of the professionals coincided or

diverged. This information was used to write a

detailed report.

The information provided by the various centres

was not homogeneous; however the apparently

contradictory statements from two or more centres

may have been due to the contextual characteristics

Table 2. Information about the services

Service


No. of people interviewed

Initial year of

service

Characteristics



1

3 (psychologist/teacher /job trainer)

1995

Carries out work integration with people with all types of disabilities.



Employs 5 professionals.

2

1 (job trainer)



1990

Carries out work integration with people with all types of disabilities.

Employs 9 professionals.

3

2 (service coordinator /job trainer)



1992

Carries out work integration with people with intellectual disabilities.

Employs 5 professionals.

4

1 (coordinator)



1991

Carries out work integration with people with intellectual disabilities.

Employs 4 professionals.

5

4 (director/3 job trainers)



1981

Carries out work integration with people with intellectual disabilities.

Employs 16 professionals.

6

3 (coordinator/social worker/psychologist)



1994

Carries out work integration with people with neuromotor disorders.

Employs 6 professionals.

7

1 (manager)



1997

Carries out work integration especially with people with visual

disabilities.

Employs 4 professionals.

8

1 (psychologist)



1989

Carries out work integration with people with all types of disabilities.

Employs 6 professionals.

9

2 (coordinator/ psychologist)



1985

Carries out work integration with people with all types of disabilities.

Employs 12 professionals.

10

2 (manager/job trainer)



1998

Carries out work integration especially with people with intellectual

disabilities and mental illness.

Employs 4 professionals.

11

2 (coordinator/job trainer)



1995

Carries out work integration especially with people with intellectual

disabilities.

Employs 3 professionals.

12

1 (coordinator)



1998

Carries out work integration especially with people with neuromotor

disorders.

Employs 6 professionals.

13

1 (coordinator)



1998

Carries out work integration especially with people with mental illness.

Employs 4 professionals.

14

2 (coordinator/job trainer)



1995

Carries out work integration especially with people with cerebral palsy

and neurological disorders.

Employs 3 professionals.

15

2 (psychologist/job trainer)



1998

Carries out work integration especially with people with auditory

disorders.

Employs 4 professionals.

16

1 (teacher)



1989

Carries out work integration especially with people with intellectual

disabilities.

Employs 4 professionals.

17

3 (director/2 job trainers)



1995

Carries out work integration especially with people with intellectual

disabilities.

Employs 3 professionals.

18

3 (coordinator/2 job trainers)



1999

Carries out work integration especially with people with intellectual

disabilities and mental illness.

Employs 4 professionals.

Work integration of people with disabilities

13

Downloaded by [University of Waterloo] at 07:02 16 December 2014 



of the services mentioned above. At the same time,

the greater or lesser emphasis of the professionals on

certain factors could be conditioned by their

individual experiences and by particular situations

that concerned them at a particular time. However

this difficulty was minimised by the fact that there

was a considerable variation in characteristics among

the 18 participating centres, and also because the

analysis of the data showed the existence of clear

lines of overall agreement between the professionals

of the various services.

Despite this agreement between the professionals,

and acknowledging that the research method chosen

(a single interview at each service) presents certain

methodological limitations, we opted to apply a

second complementary strategy that enabled us to

compare the conclusions of this line of research with

a greater number of professionals working in the

sector. Thus, in June 2003, a seminar was organised

in which 60 professionals and the members of our

research team participated with the aim of reviewing

the conclusions arrived at, qualifying and clarifying

them, and adding new elements of analysis and

guidance for professional practice.

Results

Based on the discussion of the results, each of the



analysed dimensions provides guidelines to take into

account when planning changes that can positively

affect work integration processes.

The family

The worker’s family, rather than just the worker,

becomes the focus of attention. This systematic

consideration of the family as a health agent requires

that the interaction between the family’s behaviour

and the characteristics of the person’s disability be

taken into account, as well as the way this interaction

can exercise a positive or negative influence on the

person’s life.

Families must be provided with information about

the processes of work integration and about the work

options for their family member with a disability. We

must not forget that a lack of knowledge about this

could mean that families may not be in a position to

maximise the potential for independence of their

child with a disability.

Information is essential for all families. That is to

say, letting them know about the whole process:

what the steps will be, what we expect, what can

be done…It is very important that the family is

well informed and, above all, the information

must be clear. [Job trainer, Service 1]

It seems there are limitations to knowing how to

explain to parents what having a child with a

disability means. They come here from school

and there are parents who say: nobody told me

my child is disabled. [Psychologist, Service 8]

Our findings suggest there is a need to set up

channels of joint cooperation between the family, the

service agency, and professionals, in order to offer

the necessary support to families and help them have

realistic expectations about the possibilities for social

and work integration of their son or daughter. In

this sense, there is a demonstrable need to work

systematically with families, with the aim of coordi-

nating objectives and action strategies, and to

encourage acceptance by parents of the need for

training. In this way, we can gradually maximise the

potential for collaboration between families and

professionals with regard to the design, organisation

and introduction of alternatives to uniform tradi-

tional approaches at all levels. It was noted that

collaboration with families needs to be implemented

as soon as possible. Our research points to the fact

that maintaining this dynamic of collaboration

between family and professionals is possible as long

as it is initiated at school. We understand how

important it is to structure, in a coordinated way,

professional actions throughout a person’s life, in

terms of constructing a bridge from school to work,

with the participation of the person with a disability

and their family. In this way, families will probably

be better prepared to accept the consequences that

might result from the work integration experience

and will have more strategies to confront any

possible incidents that arise during this process.

Training


Interviewed professionals agreed that companies

value social skills (communication and collaboration

with other workers), participative skills (planning and

organisation of tasks in an increasingly autonomous

way), and methodological skills (solving problems at

the workplace), more than technical skills. Therefore,

training should address the development of knowl-

edge and socio-personal skills, training in specific job

tasks, and training relating to motivation and

positive attitudes towards labour tasks, etc. The

extent to which young people have worked on these

skills in their previous training environments may

positively impact their work integration:

14

M. Vila` et al.



Downloaded by [University of Waterloo] at 07:02 16 December 2014 

Most times those boys and girls who are easy to

get on with or are more socially skilled, or they

relate and get attached more quickly to the

surroundings, find it less difficult to integrate.

[Coordinator, Service 9]

Attitudes…, social skills…are basic. They are the

first thing we work on here. We are not so highly

concerned with whether they get technical train-

ing, whether they learn what they are trained to

do, but with the attitudes and skills they need in

the world of work. [Coordinator, Service 18]

It is also important to add that, although social and

personal skills take priority over academic skills, most

of the professionals interviewed also highlighted that

the level of academic training of workers can contribute

very positively to the work integration processes, both as

far as the possibility of occupying more specialised –

and normally more qualified – posts is concerned,

and also from the viewpoint of increasing opportu-

nities to improve and make progress at work:

It is obvious that the more skills, the better. If they

can read and write, if they have good motor,

communication, speaking, time and space skills,

even better…all these areas are also very impor-

tant because many jobs involve them. All this

knowledge of reading and writing, understanding,

reflection, is useful, of course, to obtain higher

level jobs and, in some cases, to cover the

expectations of some workers and their families

more satisfactorily. [Coordinator, Service 9]

Thus, training is necessary for integration, both the

training received during compulsory education, and

the training offered by the work integration service.

Training


during

compulsory

education

should


include specific curriculum and experiences to help

prepare for the world of work, techniques for looking

for work, and the development of socio-personal

skills linked to work, etc. In addition, individualised

guidelines are needed to assist the student in

learning about his own responsibilities and interests,

and to guarantee decision making that is suitable to

his psychological, social and personal characteristics,

as well as to the work options offered by the labour

market.


The particular characteristics of the way local

supported employment programs operate in Spain,

which make them dependent on specific subsidies

instead of receiving stable funding, lead us to

consider some possible guidelines. Firstly, it is very

important that the training programs of the services

should enjoy a greater degree of flexibility than they

have at present, especially in the context of occupa-

tional training courses subsidised by the administra-

tion. Only in this way can we guarantee training that

is as individual as possible and really adjusted to the

needs and interests of the future worker. In addition,

appropriate matching of the person with a disability

to the world of work is fundamental, and therefore

we need to promote programs that enable service

professionals to make as careful an analysis as

possible of the skills, abilities, interests and work

expectations of the worker, while at the same time

adjusting as far as possible to the characteristics of

the world of work (in general, as well as in the local

area).

In addition, practical work experience prior to



work integration was widely endorsed and should be

included as one of the main learning components.

Practical in situ work training is a preparatory step

for future employment and is a key stage in the

worker’s preparation and progressive adaptation to

the workplace:

Practical work experience has a dual aim: on the

one hand, it gives training and the opportunity to

learn in real situations, and on the other, it helps

get into companies. [Psychologist, Service 8]

We cannot lose sight of the fact that often when a

person is given a contract, there is a period of

practical work experience beforehand, and this

period of work experience is a very important part

of training. Thus, apart from the values and

factors that help adapt to the workplace, there is

this later period of training, of adaptation, in the

workplace, which is a period of practical work

experience, and that is also, in short, what can

make the transition to being given a contract. [Job

Trainer, Service 10]

The work setting

Supported employment professionals believe there

should be a much more convincing effort from

government to facilitate the hiring of people with

disabilities in regular settings. Currently, what is

placing obstacles in the way of the work integration

of people with disabilities is not so much a lack of

compliance with the legal regulations (the 1982

LISMI and the so-called ‘‘alternative measures’’ to

complement the 2000 law

1

), but rather the fact that



current

legislation

favours

placement



into

the


sheltered employment sector over placement into

regular work contexts. The existence of economic

advantages for companies that hire people with

Work integration of people with disabilities

15

Downloaded by [University of Waterloo] at 07:02 16 December 2014 



disabilities is cited as an element that favours

integration; however these advantages are scarce,

and are viewed as significant only in the case of

indefinite and full-time contracts.

The ‘‘alternative measures’’ have not been well

accepted by supported employment professionals

and have been judged as a step backwards on the

path to full social and work integration of people

with disabilities:

… We don’t want to force companies to comply

with this law (the LISMI) and so, we are seeking

ways to get round it. And, instead of enforcing the

law, we enable companies to give work to special

centres, give subsidies to some foundation or

whatever, to solve this problem and, of course,

this is basically placing restrictions on compliance

with the law. [Manager, Service 10]

This [the alternative measures] is a disaster

because, firstly, there is no kind of pressure on

companies to comply. The only pressure that we

have seen is in companies with official subsidies

which, given that they have to declare they

comply with the 2% quota, sometimes call us

and say: ‘‘listen, I have to do it!’’ So it’s all a rush.

But if the company is not asking for an official

subsidy, nobody goes and tells them: ‘‘listen, if

you don’t have the 2%, pay up’’…which means

that if they didn’t comply with the 2% before-

hand, they don’t do the 2% or the alternative

measures now. But there’s also something else

and it’s that the possibility the company has to

make some kind of donation to a foundation or

sheltered employment…has generated a certain

competition of entities in our sector, to try to

occupy... We can see people going directly to

companies to get offers of donations... I don’t

think this is very positive and it would have been

worth creating a fund, and then, with a wide-

ranging participation of the entities in the sector,

decide what the money could be spent on’’.

[Coordinator, Service 6]

Although


supported

employment

services

have


progressively expanded in Spain during the last

decade, the results of these projects contrast with the

scarcity of the services offered. The effectiveness of

the work of these services also contrasts with the

irregular financing they receive from the govern-

ment.


It is known that the government gives more grants

to sheltered employment for each post created for

people with disabilities than to the companies that

decide to hire these people. This fact does not favour

the work integration of people with disabilities in the

ordinary work market. Further, this situation affects

the continuity of the supported employment services

involved, leading to job instability for their profes-

sionals as well as precariousness in their operation.

Monitoring of the worker at the workplace

To achieve optimum integration of the worker in the

company, our results highlight the critical role of two

professionals in the monitoring process: (i) the

educator or ‘‘job trainer’’ (the professional from

the work integration service) and (ii) the ‘‘natural

supervisor’’ (an employee who is the reference point

at the company, both for the supported worker and

for the service providing the support and follow-up

for the integration).

All work integration services, even those that do

not currently carry out follow-up, recognise the

importance of monitoring as a fundamental compo-

nent to facilitate the integration of the worker in the

job. The decision to carry out workplace monitoring

is not necessarily conditioned a priori by the type of

disability of the worker, but by his individual needs

and the particular characteristics of the job. Along

these lines, we cannot recommend standard time-

frames; rather, it is necessary to adapt the methodol-

ogy of monitoring (type of specific actions to carry

out, time course, and intensity of the actions)

according to the needs of the worker and those of

the workplace:

The presence of the job trainer is important,

especially at the beginning, and when there are

changes in the job…when there is a conflict the

companies ask for us to be present… It is

important that the company knows we are always

available if we consider it necessary. [Psycholo-

gist, Service 8]

... The fact that we are committed to monitoring

and providing support… that there will be some-

body there during the whole training period, they

won’t have to be there to integrate workers…

That’s important. [Job Trainer, Service 2]

We guarantee the company that we intervene

whenever there may be a conflict, for good or for

bad…or because they make improvements or

changes or… We find out from the person, or

from the company, or from both. Then, main-

taining this link also works because it means that

when one of our users changes, because they have

found something better and they have a vacancy,

they bear us in mind. [Manager, Service 10]

16

M. Vila` et al.



Downloaded by [University of Waterloo] at 07:02 16 December 2014 

An essential component of integration services is the

need to be able to provide a response to the real

demands for support by the company and by the

worker, a response that at the moment is constrained

by resources and the availability of services.

Conclusions and recommendations

The results of our study enable us to suggest a

number of different actions intended to improve the

work integration of people with disabilities.

The family

N

To consider the family as an agent of health rather



than focusing solely on the person with a

disability.

N

To constantly provide families with information



on the development of work integration pro-

cesses, as well as on the possibilities and limita-

tions of people with disabilities.

N

To set up channels of joint cooperation between



the family and the integration service to guarantee

the necessary support to families and to facilitate

coordination of the social and educational activ-

ities for people with disabilities.

Training

N

To facilitate training in skills related to autonomy,



decision making and acceptance of instructions,

responsibility, correct self-esteem, empathy in

social relations, ability to adapt to surroundings

and possible changes, during compulsory school-

ing, and in particular during secondary education,

since these are necessary job skills.

N

To broaden knowledge of the world of work,



relationships and communications, participation

in the community, problem-solving related to the

performance of work roles, and multifaceted work

skills, in the training programs during compulsory

secondary education.

N

To include a period of practical work experience



prior to work integration as a way of favouring in

situ training of the skills directly related to the

performance of the work role.

The work setting

N

To guarantee the continuity of work integration



experiences of people with disabilities, it is

necessary to integrate supported employment into

the network of social services, and to promote

coordination between supported employment and

sheltered employment services.

Monitoring the worker at the workplace

N

A basic factor contributing to the success of the



integration process is that the job trainer should

accompany the worker in the integrated work-

place. The pace and intensity of this support must

not be conditioned by the worker’s disability type,

but by the individual needs of the person with a

disability and the particular demands of the job.

Work integration is only one aspect of social

integration; therefore, we need to offer a response to

the needs of community participation of people with

disabilities, beyond their participation in the world of

work. Along these lines, it is vital to create awareness

among the general public – not just the work agents

– of the work possibilities of people with disabilities

and their potential for full participation.

Further collaborative research between the uni-

versity sector and work integration professionals

appears to be urgently needed. Only in this way will

we be able to directly influence matters related to

practical intervention needs and at the same time

facilitate the dissemination of this information.

In conclusion, this study confirmed the funda-

mental idea that it is essential to involve all people

with disabilities in the decisions that affect their

lives, from their active participation in the manage-

ment of centres or services, to their involvement in

research processes. Too often, it is assumed that

people with disabilities do not have the ability to

state or act upon decisions about their lives. The

results of this survey and previous research on the

social and work integration of these people firmly

deny this stance, and confirm that there is a need to

give real opportunities to people with disabilities so

that they may actively participate in their life

itinerary.

Author note

This research forms part of: Estudio de la integracio

´ n

laboral de personas con discapacidad mediante



Trabajo con Apoyo en el Estado espan

˜ ol. Ana´lisis

de los factores clave y estrategias para la mejora de los

procesos de insercio

´ n (2000–2003). Research funded

by the Research Directorate – Ministry of Science and

Technology – Research Project in the Knowledge

General Programme. Reference: BSO2000-321.

No restrictions were placed on the publication of

data obtained during the research, and no personal

income was received by the authors.

Work integration of people with disabilities

17

Downloaded by [University of Waterloo] at 07:02 16 December 2014 



Note

1

The LISMI (Law of Social Integration of the Disabled: Law



13/82) establishes the obligation to hire people with disabilities

in public and private companies of 50 or more workers. The

‘‘alternative measures’’ are substitutive actions (alternatives)

to this obligation, which allow state or private companies to be

totally or partially exempt from hiring people with disabilities if

they take out a civil or commercial contract with a Special

Work Centre or with an autonomous worker with disabilities

for the supply of primary material, fittings, machinery, etc, or

if they provide donations or financial sponsorship to entities

that work to promote work integration of people with

disabilities.

References

Alomar, E. (2004). El treball dels joves amb retard mental en entorns

normalitzats: Ana`lisi d’una realitat de treball amb suport. Facultat

de

Psicologia,



Cie`ncies

de

l’Educacio´



I

de

l’Esport



Blanquerna.

Universitat

Ramon

Llull.


Tesi

Doctoral,

Barcelona. (In Catalan).

Bellver, F. (2001). Fifteen years of supported employment in

Europe. Alimara. Revista de Treball Social, 48, 65–73. (In

Catalan).

de Ruiz Olabue´naga, J. I., & Ispizua, M. A. (1989). La

descodificacio´n de la vida cotidiana. Me´todos de investigacio´n

cualitativa. Bilbao: Universidad de Deusto. (In Spanish).

Fontana, A., & Frey, J. H. (1998). Interviewing: The art of

science. In N. K. Denzin, & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), Collecting

and interpreting qualitative data (pp. 47–77). Thousand Oaks,

CA: Sage.

Fullana, J., Pallisera, M., & Vila`, M. (2003). Research into work

integration processes of people with disabilities in regular

settings: A qualitative study of cases. Revista de Investigacio´n

Educativa, 21, 305–321. (In Spanish).

Jorda´n, F. B., & Verdugo, M. A. (2003). Supported employment in

Spain. Analysis of variables that determine achievement and

improve results in the development of services. Real Patronato

sobre Discapacidad – Ministerio de Trabajo y Asuntos

Sociales. Documentos 59/2003, Madrid. (In Spanish).

Law 13/82 (7-4-82) on the Social Integration of Persons with

Disabilities (LISMI). (In Spanish).

Pallisera, M., & Vila`, M. (2001). The work integration of severely

physically disabled persons in the Girona region (2000–2001).

Catalonia, Spain: University of Girona.

Pallisera, M., Vila`, M., & Valls, M. J. (2003). The current

situation of supported employment in Spain: Analysis and

perspectives

based

on

the



perception

of

professionals.



Disability & Society, 18, 797–810.

Pallisera, M., Vila`, M., Valls, M. J., Rius, M., Fullana, J .,

Jime´nez, P., et al. (2003). The work integration of people with

disabilities in the ordinary labour market in Spain: An

approach through research. Siglo Cero, 34, No.208 5–18. (In

Spanish).

Research Group on Diversity. (2000a). Study of the work

integration of people with borderline intellectual disabilities in the

Public Administration of Catalonia (1998–2000). Collaboration

agreement

between

University



of

Girona


and

Nabiu


Association (Association for the work integration of people

with disabilities in the public administration, in Catalonia).

Unpublished report.

Research Group on Diversity. (2000b). Study of the work

integration of people with disabilities through supported employment

in the Girona region (1999–2000). Catalonia, Spain: University

of Girona.

Research Group on Diversity. (2004). Study of the work itineraries

experienced by people with borderline intellectual disabilities who

have followed integration processes into Public Administration jobs

in Catalonia. Analysis of the impact of work integration on the

social integration processes of disabled workers (2000–2004).

Collaboration agreement between University of Girona and

Nabiu Association (Association for the work integration of

people with disabilities in the public administration, in

Catalonia). Unpublished report.

Rius, M. (2005). Recerca sobre les persones amb discapacitat psı´quica

contractades a l’Administracio´ de la Generalitat de Catalunya.

Ana`lisi de la incide`ncia de la insercio´ laboral en diferents dimensions

de la vida dels treballadors amb discapacitat psı´quica. Tesis

doctoral, Universitat de Girona (In Catalan).

Saloviita, T. (2000). Supported employment as a paradigm shift

and a cause of legitimation crisis. Disability & Society, 1,

87–98.


Serra, F. (2004). La prese`ncia del suport natural en els processos

d’inclusio´ laboral mitjanc¸ant el model de treball amb suport

(Supported

Employment).

Departament

de

Cie`ncies



de

l’Educacio´. Universitat de les Illes Balears. Tesi Doctoral.

Palma de Mallorca. (In Catalan).

Verdugo, M. A., & Jorda´n, F. B. (2001). Panora´mica del empleo con

apoyo en Espan

˜ a. Madrid: Real Patronato sobre Discapacidad-

Ministerio de Trabajo y Asuntos Sociales. (In Spanish).

Verdugo, M. A., Jorda´n, F. B., Bellver, F., & Martı´nez, S. (1998).

Supported employment in Spain. Journal of Vocational

Rehabilitation, 11, 223–232.

Visier, L. (2000). Labour relations in sheltered employment. In

L. Visier, P. Thornton, & V. Mora (Eds.), New international

perspectives on employment of people with disabilities (pp. 13–89).

Madrid: Escuela Libre Editorial. (In Spanish).

Wehman, P. (1981). Competitive employment: New horizons for

severely disabled individuals. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

Wehman, P. (1992a). Achievement and Challenges: A Five-year

Report on the Status of the National Supported Employment

Initiative, 1986–1990. Rehabilitation Research and Training

Center on Supported Employment, Virginia Commonwealth

University.

Wehman, P. (1992b). Life beyond the classroom. Transition strategies

for young people with disabilities. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

18

M. Vila` et al.



Downloaded by [University of Waterloo] at 07:02 16 December 2014 

Yüklə 198,46 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə