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CONCORD-CARLISLE REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT



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CONCORD-CARLISLE REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT
Concord-Carlisle High School has made excellent progress during 2011 due to the investment of many: students committed to learning at high levels, educators dedicated to effectively teaching students and to pursuing scholarship in their academic disciplines, parents invested in the life of the school, and community members demonstrating support through personal connections and fiscal resources. We are so grateful for these contributions that foster excellence in the high school. Student enrollment for 2011-12 is 1210 students, eleven students less than 2010-11. However, during the last decade student enrollment steadily increased from 1015 students in 1998 to 1268 in 2008.
During the 2011 year, Concord-Carlisle High School continued to set high expectations for all students and reinforced its commitment to motivate young people to expand their knowledge and to develop intellectual, analytical, and social skills daily. 100% of the Class of 2011 received a Competency Determination as a result of passing the English Language Arts, Math and Science MCAS Tests.

    • 97% of 10th grade students scored proficient or advanced on the ELA MCAS.

    • 94% of 10th grade students scored proficient or advanced on the Math MCAS.

    • 94% of 10th grade students passed one of the Science MCAS tests.

The median SAT score for the Class of 2011 was 1860 (with 1526 as the state average). Twelve (12) students in the Class of 2011 have qualified as National Merit Scholar Finalists and three (3) National Merit Scholarships were ultimately awarded. From 2003-2011, 96% of AP Exams taken by CCHS students received a passing score (3 or higher.) Overall, 83% of AP exams were scored at 4 or 5.


The school continued its longstanding tradition of encouraging students to be contributing and caring members of the school, of the larger community, and of the world beyond. As a testament to this, students demonstrated their commitment to social responsibility through participation in numerous activities, raising funds for global efforts to aid relief efforts in numerous countries, and participating in the French and Turkmenistan Exchanges, and hosting Japanese visitors from Nanae. In the summer of 2012, students will travel to Tanzania to perform community service in rural areas. Locally, our students committed over 10,000 hours of service to the surrounding communities during the 2011-12 school year. The volunteer work and community service done by the young people of Carlisle, Concord, and Boston are evidence that students have internalized the core values of the district and CCHS.
The major highlight of 2011 was the successful passage of the CCHS Building Project at both Town Meetings and at the polls. With assistance of the Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA,) a new building for our students will be built on the site behind the current high school. The current timeline has a completion date of either the Spring or Fall of 2015. We are extremely grateful for the support that the voters of both communities demonstrated, and on behalf of the students of Concord and Carlisle, we thank you!
The teachers of Concord-Carlisle High School believe in the continuous improvement of both their instructional practices and the methods by which they assess students. Faculty engaged in high-quality professional development efforts to improve their technology skills, remains forward thinking in their practice, and redesign program content and delivery. New courses were developed this year including Organic Chemistry, Advanced Earth Science – Physical Geology & Geologic Mapping and Engineering (several.) CCHS is also offering a Global Literacy Certificate, a program in which students can demonstrate their knowledge of foreign language and world cultures.
Over the past year, the faculty has been broadening the ways in which digital tools can transform the way that students learn and “show what they know.” Technological teaching tools are revolutionizing the way student’s access information and how teachers present concepts. New wireless hubs have been added throughout the building to meet the growing need for laptops and web appliances. Students and teachers in each classroom enjoy use of Activboards in storing and retrieving information and accessing websites. During the summer of 2011, CCHS technology teacher-leaders presented several weeklong ActiveBoard courses for twenty colleagues. Twenty more teachers are now piloting online learning opportunities for students in their courses using Moodle, a free open-source software package.
This year, five new teachers joined the high school professional staff to fill vacancies created by retirements, resignations, and leaves. To ensure that new staff members swiftly and substantively become part of the learning community at Concord-Carlisle High School, the district invested considerable resources in a mentoring program.
The bullets which follow provide a sampling of the work, activities, and accomplishments of students and staff—all of which contribute to making Concord-Carlisle High School a community where academic excellence, achievement, social commitment, public service, and involvement in the arts, athletics and other extracurricular activities are greatly valued.


  • The average number of CCHS graduates planning to continue their education in postsecondary placements was 95%. In a survey of graduating seniors, 63% reported they were admitted to their 1st choice college, and 20% were admitted to their 2nd choice college.

  • CCHS students continue to be successful in the college admissions process. From 2007-2011, 35% of students, who were planning to go on to college, matriculated at very selective institutions (colleges that admit 40% or fewer applicants) and 44% matriculated at selective institutions (colleges that admit 41-70% of applicants).

  • The CCHS Repertory and Concert Bands earned gold medals at the prestigious Massachusetts Instrumental and Choral Conductors Association (MICCA) State Concert Festival. Four students were nominated and accepted into the MENC All-Eastern Honors Ensembles. In the fall of 2011, the CCHS Band hosted the Nanae (Japan) High School band for the first time.

  • Students participated in the Boston Globe Scholastic Art Awards regional exhibit and earned gold and silver keys. Students participated locally in the Lexington Arts and Crafts Society Show for art majors and the year-end awards and retrospective at Concord Art Association.

  • In the fall of 2010, over 50 students worked together to build sets, coordinate lighting and sound for the production, and perform in the play Noises Off. In the winter of 2011, over 150 students performed as actors or musicians, created technical designs, built sets/props, implemented theatrical lighting and sound, and served as stage crew for the musical The Producers. In May 2011, over 30 students performed on stage and were involved as technical crew for Shakespeare's Pericles.

  • The CCHS Student Senate sponsored a freshman orientation program that brought all of the incoming ninth grade students together for an informative and fun-filled day before school started. Additionally, the Senate has implemented an expanded Advisory program for both freshmen and sophomores. The Senate is also working many projects focused on student life managing student stress, enhancing communication among all members of the school community, and increasing green initiatives.

  • Over 300 students participated in Challenge Day, a unique program designed to

enhance a positive school climate and communicate that individuals can make a

difference.



  • 2011 Athletic Teams

  • Div. 2 State Semifinalist: Girls Ice Hockey

  • Boys and Girls Nordic and Alpine Ski Teams Qualified for All State finals and won league championships

  • State Champions in Diving: Sean O'Brien and Sloane Brazina

  • State Swim Champion: Drew Andre

  • Boys Basketball and Ice Hockey qualified for the North Sectional Tournament

  • DCL Champions Spring: Boys Lacrosse, Girls Lacrosse, Boys Track, Girls Tennis

  • State Semifinalists: Boys Lacrosse @ Harvard Stadium

  • North Semifinalist: Girls Tennis, Girls Lacrosse

  • State Girls Golf Champion: Karolyne Shieh

  • DCL Champions Fall: Football, Boys Soccer, Girls Soccer, Golf, Volleyball, Boys Cross Country

  • Div. 3 Super Bowl Champions: Football @ Gillette Stadium

  • North Sectional Champions State Finalist: Boys Soccer

  • Golf Div. North Sectionals 2nd All State Golf 3rd

  • Boys and Girls Cross Country Qualified for All State Cross Country Meet Div. 1

Diana F. Rigby, Superintendent

Peter Badalament, Principal

Contributors to the reports include the following:

Peter Badalament, Concord-Carlisle High School Principal

Lynne Beattie, Concord Middle School Principal

Kelly Clough, Thoreau Principal

Kathy Codianne, Director of Teaching and Learning

Patricia Fernandes, Willard Principal

John Flaherty, Deputy Superintendent of Finance and Operations

Kelly McCausland, Director of Human Resources

Jessica Murphy, Director of Special Education

Diana F. Rigby, Superintendent

Gene Warfel, Director of Information Technology



Sharon Young, Alcott Principal
CONCORD-CARLISLE

REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE
Concord-Carlisle High School (CCHS) is an institution on the move. It is hard to keep track of all the great things happening at CCHS. First and foremost, we can’t thank the citizens of Concord enough for the strong support that the community demonstrated for our recently approved building project. There was a tremendous showing at Town Meeting where the vote to approve the project passed overwhelmingly in a packed meeting. Then a week later, at the polls, over 84% of the over 4000 voters who turned out voted in favor of the project. This is the highest approval percentage that the state has seen from any community voting on a new school construction project!
The process of determining what to do with the current CCHS building began over a decade ago. Many people put in a lot of work over that time working on solutions. Now, with support from the state in the form of a $28 Million grant and overwhelming support from the communities of Concord and Carlisle, we are on our way to having a first-class, new CCHS building. The new facility will be green, sustainable, and flexible enough to handle the learning needs of today and tomorrow. It will be a building that the towns of Concord and Carlisle will be proud of. The building committee is hard at work with the architects designing all the details of the new school and we expect to be moving into the new building in the fall of 2015!
Just as there are great things happening with our facility, exciting things are happening with our programs. Next year we will be launching the “Rivers and Revolutions” program spearheaded by Michael Goodwin. This program will allow juniors and seniors an alternative to the normal academic schedule for a semester. The program will involve teaching most academic course work material via central subjects with a team of teachers dedicated to the effort. Students will have the opportunity to learn in a much different environment then they are used to.
The opportunities for learning at CCHS are endless. We have some of the most dynamic and exciting faculty who continually engage and challenge students. Our teachers also dedicate their time outside the classroom to coordinate extra-curricular activities, coach athletic teams, and mentor students. One such example is the program run by Jeff Yuhas in the science department. What started as a small pilot project to involve students in the study of weather has now led to an actual weather report being reported on and produced by the students and aired on CCTV. The students traveled to a national meteorological conference to present their work.
CCHS is a leader in the use of technology to foster the learning process. Our superintendent, Diana Rigby, was recently recognized and received the MassCUE Administrator Award for being a leader in the promotion and adoption of technology as it relates to student learning. She truly understands the ways in which technology can be used to further academic exploration and provides the tools and training necessary to achieve great results.
CCHS and our students achieve at the highest levels in all areas. CCHS was ranked 2nd

in the state last year in the annual Boston Magazine rankings for top public high schools

in the state. Our students place at the top of the state in standardized test scores and at the top of the nation in SAT and AP exam scores. Extracurricular activities such the Environmental Field Studies Group and the Robotics Club provide opportunities for further exploration in the areas of science and technology. In addition to our excellent core academic program, our elective courses allow students to participate in and excel at such endeavors as music, theater, visual arts, and athletics. Our band programs have won gold and silver medals at the MICCA state concert festivals and our student musicians have performed in the all-state ensemble. CCHS students have won state and national awards in the visual arts, such as the Boston Globe Scholastic Art Award and the Congressional Art Award. Our athletic programs continue to shine. This year our Football team marched through the season with an undefeated record and its first Super Bowl Championship since 1978. The freshmen mentoring program and the “Be the Change – Challenge Day” program are two examples of terrific outside the classroom programs that make CCHS the special place it is.
While our students do go on to attend many top level colleges and universities, we should never lose sight that what is really important is to achieve success, fulfillment and happiness in life. This means different things to different people and it can be accomplished through many different avenues. The teenage years can be stressful enough. Although we want our students to achieve at the highest levels possible, we also want to recognize the need for balance and a healthy learning environment.

We strongly believe that a well-rounded high school education includes opportunities for developing character and values through service to others. In 2011, CCHS students performed over 10,000 hours of community service in Concord and surrounding areas. CCHS was among the first public high schools in the United States to institute a community service requirement of 40 hours for graduation, but most students do many more hours of service. Open Table, Gaining Ground, Concord Council on Aging, Emerson Hospital, Concord Public Library, and Concord Children’s Center are just a few of the local organizations served by our students. A CCHS parent group, 2Volunteer (2volunteeronline.org), facilitates connections between the needs of the community and individual students.


The school committee is very grateful for generous donations from local non-profit organizations, the CCHS Parents Association, the Concord-Carlisle Community Chest, and individuals in both Concord and Carlisle. The Concord Education Fund has awarded grants that support the Environmental Field Studies Group, a new club that studies the Blanding’s turtle and the local environment, and the CCHS advisory program, a new program to enhance the relationships and emotional support that students create at CCHS. The Education Fund has also contributed significantly to projects to install Xirrus wireless hubs, install and equip the digital recording studio, and support initiatives in science and technology. These funds allow us to enhance and expand the educational experience of our students.
The Concord-Carlisle Regional School District (CCRSD) serves 1209 students in grades

9-12 from Concord, Carlisle, and Boston (through the METCO program). Enrollment at

CCHS has remained relatively consistent since 2002, with an average of 1236 students per year. In addition, 13 students of ages 14-22 participate in the life skills program at CCHS and the region supports 38 students who attend out-of-district placements.
We strive every year to develop responsible budgets that allow us to maintain the high quality of our education program but recognize the tough fiscal climate. Our goal has been and continues to be to construct budgets which provide for the needs of CCHS but also fall within the levy limit (therefore not requiring and override). We have not had an override for the CCRSD’s Operating Budget since 2007. This year we have put forth one of the smallest budget increase requests ever, a 1.8% increase. Given the magnitude of the building project and the significant increased pressure on the CPS budget, we made the decision to make some reductions at the High School in order help reduce the impact to taxpayers.
We want to recognize the exemplary leadership of our administrators and the exceptional faculty and staff who make CCHS a vibrant and active learning community. CCRSD and the Concord-Carlisle Teachers’ Association continue their work on a new supervision and evaluation process. We look forward to its completion and implementation this coming year.
This past fall we lost one of our most beloved teachers, David Prifti after a 4 year battle with cancer. Dave taught at CCHS for the past 25 years. He was an inspiring and talented art teacher. He had a wonderful wit and a vibrant personality and a unique ability to connect with students. He will long be remembered by all he knew him.
The Concord-Carlisle Regional District School Committee is comprised of the five members of the Concord School Committee with the addition of two members from Carlisle. This year, we welcomed Chad Koski of Carlisle back to the committee. After serving six years on the Committee I will be completing my tenure as will Jerry Wedge. I can confidently say that no single person has made more of an impact in the rebuilding of our schools then Jerry Wedge. His expertise and dedication have served our community exceptionally well.
We are truly grateful to the citizens of Concord for their strong support of the students of Concord-Carlisle High School. The Concord community clearly values education and the results speak for themselves. Please take the time to read the annual performance report when it comes out in the spring. It spotlights many of the great achievements and activities happening at CCHS.
Members:

Peter Fischelis - Chair

Fabian Fondriest, Vice-Chair

Bill Fink

Jerry Wedge

Pamela Gannon

Louis Salemy

Maureen Spada



CONCORD-CARLISLE REGIONAL

SCHOOL DISTRICT ENROLLMENT
OCTOBER 1, 2011




























RESIDENT STUDENTS




9

10

11

12

Total




Concord

202

206

193

210

811




Carlisle
NON-RESIDENT STUDENTS

69


72

93

85

319





METCO METCO




18

20

17

14

69




Tuition Waived Tuition Waived



5

2

3

0

10




State Wards Tuition-In




0

0

0

0

0




Total Non-Resident




23

22

20

14

79




Total Enrollment




294

300

306

309

1209




Out of Dist. Special Education
















38




GRAND TOTAL

-













1247





Human Resources - 2011
At the end of the 2011 calendar year the following people retired from the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District.
Instructional Staff Years in Concord-Carlisle

Lee Cooprider 10




Non-instructional Staff

David Eddy 45

Betty Kelley 48

At the end of the 2011 calendar year the following people retired from the Concord Public Schools and the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District.


Instructional Staff Years in Concord and Concord-Carlisle

Jane Ross 26


Employees – 25 Years or More of Service

Concord-Carlisle High School
Teachers Non-Instructional

Al Dentino Claudia Dellovo

Joe Leone

Jerry Moss Mary Zellner




Carlisle Public/Concord-Carlisle High School
Teachers Non-Instructional Court Booth

Susan Dunn

Donnie Foss

Rocky Griffin

Ann Pike Linda Robbins

Bud Sheridan

Liz Tencati

Bob Wheeler



CONCORD CARLISLE SCHOLARSHIP FUND

The Concord Carlisle Scholarship Fund (CCSF) is a tax-exempt charitable trust which is affiliated with New England Dollars for Scholars, a program of Scholarship America. Established in 1966, the Fund provides need-based grants to assist deserving young women and men obtain, to the fullest extent possible, the benefit of additional educational opportunities that may be open to them after completion of their secondary school studies. The Fund is administered by an 18-member, all-volunteer board of trustees. Scholarships are financed by an annual appeal, by a student-staffed phone-a-thon, and by income generated from memorial gifts, bequests, and named funds. Complete information about the organization can be found on the Fund’s web site: www.ccscholarshipfund.org

Grant recipients must either reside, or have attended school, in Concord or Carlisle. Since its inception, the Fund has assisted over 1000 students. This year, the Trustees were pleased to award almost $150,500 to high school seniors and in-college students while the Fund’s affiliated organizations supplemented this amount with another $47,500.
In May 2011, Concord Carlisle Scholarship Fund awards were made to the following students from the funds provided by our annual income: Benjamin Aghion, Natalie Allen, Alexandra Anthony, Winston Anthony, Emily Balmuth-Loris, Dylan Benkley, Matthew Bergwall, Madeline Bilodeau, Michelle Bilodeau, Scott Bloom, Thomas Bloom, Anya Bounar, Julia Brem, Destinee Brodie, Maree Budris, Yamiley Cavemitte, Randy Chin, Will Coffey, David Corbie, Katelyn Deisenroth, Avital DeSharone, Philip Dumka, Patrick Fantasia, Nathan Feshbach-Meriney, Louis Fiorentini, Matthew Gray, Erin Guertin, Alanah Haynes, James Hitchcock, Sasha Jackson, Christopher Jordan, Tamara Jordan, Dylan Katz-Wicks, Lauren LaBrie, Talk Lekorenos, Dillon Mariano, Jamie Maslowski, Alexander Milofsky, Victoria Moniz, Jeffrey Moran, Isabel Morgan, Melissa Nelms, Tiffany Nova, Kathleen Orlando, Jennifer Perugini, Donna Pioli, Jhalisa Potts and Nicholas Rideout.

The following students received awards from named scholarships established by bequests and memorial gifts: Breanna Andrade and Edward Pioli (The William W. Anderson Memorial Fund), Edward Pioli and Jamison Silverman (The Bean Family Scholarship), Jana Herman (The Trudy Biernson Memorial Scholarship), Spencer Ward (The Concord Women’s Club – Ruth Bullerwell Scholarship), Olivia Linville (The Mary Connorton Memorial Scholarship), Tomasen Brady (The Clair Day Memorial Scholarship), Philip Fiorentini (The Elaine DiCicco Fund), Tiara Roberts (The Charles Evans Fund), Austin Eifler (The John B. Finigan Memorial Scholarship), Calbe Malchik (The Wilson Flight Fund), Julia Gwinn (The Essie Golden Fund),), Olivia Patsos (The Bobby Gray Memorial Scholarship), Erica Schaefer, Phoebe Sturges, Carl Sundquist, Chloe Vilain and Daniel Zwicker (The Margaret Haggerty Scholarship), Abigail Owen (The Wells A. Hall Memorial Scholarship), Breanna Andrade (The Anthony Halls-Keenan Smith Scholarship), Chapman Wells (The Christopher Hentchel-WIQH Memorial Scholarship), Rachel Dumka and Brian Wholihan (The Seitaro & Shina Ishihara Memorial Fund), Jacquelyn Malis (The Tama Ishihara Memorial Scholarship), Ashley Silva (The Vinod Jalan Memorial Fund), Tomasen Brady, Will Coffey, Jibrail Coy and Spencer Coy (The Casper C. Jenney and Eleanor M. Jenney Fund), Ashley Silva (The Diane Kenneally Memorial Fund), Melissa Mariano (The Knights of Columbus Scholarship Fund), Dylan Benkley (The Norton Levy Fund), Carolina Zapata (The Charles E. Manion, Jr. Memorial Award), Benjamin Parra and Hannah Parra (The Adrian A. Martinez Memorial Scholarship), Sean Dalton, Jacquelyn Malis and John Nevins (The Elizabeth A. Mattison Memorial Fund), Chloe Penaud (The Dr. Barbara Schips Miller Scholarship), Julia Brem (The Janet Gates Peckham Fund ), Olivia Patsos (The Albert L. & June B. Powers Scholarship), Tatjana Sena (The Marguerite Purcell Memorial Fund), David Lishansky (The Nick Ressler Memorial Scholarship), David Corbie (The Al Robichaud Fund), Amanda Boucher, Alexis Cheney, Laurena Fasillia, Emily Hughes, Andrew Lavrennikov and Ethan Magno (The Farnham W. Smith Fund), Dominque Blaides (The Mark Teverovsky Fund), Julia Brem (The Jeanne A. Toombs Memorial Scholarship), Carolina Zapata (The Video Revolution, Ralph & Ellie Grossi Scholarship), Dominque Blaides and Brian Wholihan(The Doug White Memorial Scholarship), Jamison Silverman (The Charles K. Yeremian Award), and Chapman Wells (The Tameji & Chivo Yoshimura Memorial Fund). The CCSF Trustees Fund Scholarship was granted to Michaela Zucker.


The Scholarship Fund added two new named funds that were awarded for the first time this year. David Lishansky received The CHS/CCHS Alumni Scholarship, Julia Lesses received The James E. Shepherd Memorial Scholarship, and Austin Eifler received the David S. Soleau Memorial Scholarship.
In addition, the Trustees awarded the following Scholarships and Awards from our Affiliates: The Rivercrest-Deaconess-Newbury Court Award to Abigail Owen; The Rotary Club of Concord Scholarships to Enyoio Adegbe, David Blaides, Merrill Brady, Jonathan Davies, Meredith Lorch and Chloe Penaud; The Rotary Club of Concord William L. Eaton Memorial Scholarship to William Moss; Rotary Club of Concord Thomas R. Huckins Memorial Scholarship to Madeline Mahoney; Melissa Mariana and Chapman Wells (The Carlisle Garden Club Debbie Wright Scholarship), Graham Peck, Edward Pioli, Matthew Solomon and Laura Steinroeder (The Charles Williams Fund); Jana Herman (The Concord Children’s Center); Jibrail Coy, Joseph Morahan, Victoria Vierstra and Margaret Waterman (The United Women’s Club of Concord); Sonia Boor and Julia Lesses (The Carlisle Old Home Day Scholarship); Victoria Vierstra (The Walden Woods Project Scholarship); Sean Dalton (The Concord Firefighters’ Relief Fund), and Nathan Feshbach-Meriney, Julia Gwinn and Tatjana Sena (various Town of Concord named scholarships).
The Concord Carlisle Scholarship Fund trustees are indebted to the citizens of Concord and Carlisle and friends from other towns, as well as to the Concord-Carlisle Community Chest, whose generosity has enabled the Fund to provide scholarships to all of these deserving students, and we wish them well in their post-secondary educational pursuits.
Members

Lucy Miller, Chair Paul Ressler, Past Chair

Lindsay Smith Kafka, Assistant Chair Elaine DiCicco, Secretary

Albert Powers, Treasurer Dorothy Bean, Recording Secretary

Ed Sonn, Assistant Treasurer Kenneth Anderson

Jeanne DeTemple Molly Eberle

Barbara Fisher David Gould

Teri Hale Mary-Beth Jones

John F. Mee Thomas Rutledge

Priscilla White Sturges Christopher Wilson



CONCORD-CARLISLE REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT

Adult & Community Education
Concord Carlisle Adult & Community Education (CCACE) provides opportunities for lifelong learning to the citizens of the school district and surrounding towns.
Collaborating with citizens and organizations, CCACE responds to community needs and interests with our communities' talents and resources, calling upon local people to develop and coordinate programs and services for children, adolescents and adults throughout the year.
We make schools available for extended-day educational use for citizens in Carlisle and Concord. We promote and support School and Town projects that cannot be funded or presented in traditional ways.
CCACE is both a program of classes and educational events and a process that connects local citizens with each other and their public schools in ways that are creative, educational and cost effective.
FY 2011 Summary of Activities

2,207 enrollments in fee-based continuing education classes

274 on-ground courses with sufficient funding were conducted

52 on-line classes (new 6-week classes start each month)

374 students enrolled in instrumental music lessons (32-40 sessions each)

145 new students enrolled in driver education training

2,000+ participants in walk-in programs and events (no registration or fee required)
CCACE provided a comprehensive program of non-credit, fee-based learning opportunities for local residents. Two hundred and thirty-two community educators contributed to the program during Fiscal Year (FY) 2011, teaching one or more courses.
The department completed its seventh consecutive year of self-funded activity in FY2011, recovering 95% of the costs for teachers, administrative and management salaries, non-salary expenses and capital investments. Department costs were $675,744, and revenues $644,760. The deficit of $30,984 was the result of capital investment for CCHS Driver Education, reducing the revolving account balance to $63,265 to begin FY 2012 programs and services. A grant from the Concord Carlisle Community Chest provided financial aid to more than 200 local families and individuals, and no one was turned away because of an inability to pay a course fee.
Children and adults of all ages participated in community education programs. Most of the K-12 participants enrolled in before-school, after-school and summer classes. Adults were active in daytime and evening classes. Instrumental music lessons were held throughout the year, helping young students enrich their school-day music education. The CCHS driver education welcomed 145 new students for classroom learning, and provided on-road training for more than 300 throughout the year. The Village University, a program for mature citizens who seek advanced studies similar to a graduate seminar, conducted its eighth successful year of classes with its volunteer faculty.
The CCACE Advisory Committee worked with the staff, faculty and School Committee, representing the interests of both towns and advocating for community access to continuing education. Advisory Committee members are appointed by the Regional School Committee for three-year terms. They ensure that the department is sensitive to community needs and manages its limited resources to best advantage. Citizens are urged to contact Committee members, share ideas and volunteer, so that the Adult & Community Education program may respond to community needs, further enrich the towns, and achieve our shared educational goals.
Concord-Carlisle Adult & Community Education

~a school service for the community since 1954~
500 Walden St, Concord 318-1432 ace@colonial.net www.ace.colonial.net
All program information on line at www.ace.colonial.net

Courtland Booth, Director


Advisory Committee

Jennifer Albanese, Chairperson

Paul Anagnostopoulos, Susan Cannon, Susan Frey,
Meg Gaudet, Estelle Keast and Michael Rudd

Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School District

About Minuteman

Minuteman is a four-year public high school serving the member towns of: Acton, Arlington, Belmont, Bolton, Boxborough, Carlisle, Concord, Dover, Lancaster, Lexington, Lincoln, Needham, Stow, Sudbury, Wayland, and Weston. Minuteman combines rigorous academics in preparation for college with relevant career and technical programs.
Carlisle Enrollment

As of October 1, 2011, seven (7) high school students were enrolled at Minuteman providing a full time equivalent (FTE) of seven (7) students that reside in Carlisle.
Minuteman experienced a 7% increase in the Freshman Class resulting in the largest freshman class in 12 years.
Concord-Carlisle Regional High School and Minuteman Half Day Program

Minuteman offers a unique program allowing juniors and seniors, who have passed the MCAS, enrollment on a half day-every day basis in a career major. This allows a student to graduate from Concord-Carlisle Regional High School and receive a competency certificate from Minuteman. Currently, no Carlisle students participate.


Minuteman offers ‘Post Graduate’ programs to Carlisle residents of any age who are seeking to enhance their skill development. Post-Graduate Students are charged tuition to offset operating costs.
Class of 2011 Graduate Achievement Highlights

  • 73% college bound or advanced Technical Training, 12% career bound and 4% military. Overall, graduates achieved an 89% positive placement rate.

  • 100% of Dental graduates passed the National Dental Board examination.

  • 90% of Early Education and Care program completers were certified by the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care.

  • 78% of Cosmetology graduates passed State Board examinations.

  • Health Occupation graduates achieved 78% in college acceptance.

  • 86% of Environmental Technology graduates earned the Massachusetts Grade II Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator License.


Capital Projects

  • Lexington Water Department is requiring replacement of several major components of the school’s water supply system. This work will be completed in December 2011; estimated total cost of $120,000 is covered out of our FY12 budget.

  • An emergency $475,000 capital project was successfully completed. Lexington issued an order at the end of June 2011 in regards to the area of the school known as the Trades Hall. The order restricted access and occupancy to the Trades Hall immediately. Minuteman had to obtain a waiver from DCAM to hire a design architect, demolish the interior area and rebuild the area under current building codes in order to open school in the fall.

  • MSBA Update: Minuteman is in the “pipeline” of the Vocational School Repair and Renew program announced by the State Treasurer’s office in 2010.The Feasibility Study financing was unanimously approved by all 16 member towns in 2010. The School Building Committee will review various models to accommodate member community enrollment, as well as various levels of non-member enrollment. A final project model is expected by 2014.


Curriculum and Instruction

  • Since 2008, all 9th grade students have English and Math every day, rather than a “week-on-week-off” schedule, thus providing more consistent and concentrated instruction as well as project-based learning.

  • The Educational Program planning process has identified several possible new programs that may offer students increased choices in career majors, including Criminal Justice/Bio-Security, Animal Science and the Technical Theater Arts. Two programs phased out in 2010 included Office Technology and Auto Body Repair. Drafting and Design Visual Communications will be phased out by 2014.


Student Access, Participation and Support

  • An Executive Function initiative was launched last year. Minuteman provides students with resources to enhance their planning and organization skills.

  • Minuteman continues to support a full-time Reading Specialist. In addition to working with the students on his own caseload, he consults with academic and CTE teachers toward the development and application of a school-wide reading program.

  • The Special Education department successfully implemented the Student Learning Center (SLC). The SLC allows students to understand their disability, develop skills, and techniques to minimize the impact of the student’s disability, and to promote independence and personal responsibility. The SLC supports the transition to college.

Donald Rober, School Committee Member


INDEX

Adult and Community Education ……………………………….. 230

Assessors, Board of ……………………………………………… 121

Building Inspector ……………………………………………….. 134

Carlisle Housing Authority ………………………………………... 136

Carlisle Affordable Housing Trust ……………………………….. 143

Conservation Commission ………………………………………. 167

Conservation Restriction Advisory Committee …………………… 173

Council on Aging …………………………………………………. 148

Carlisle Cultural Council …………………………………………. 206

Fire Department ………………………………………………….. 160

Gleason Public Library ……………………………………………. 198

Health, Board of ………………………………………………….. 127

Historical Commission ……………………………………………. 152

Household Recycling Committee …………………………………. 176

Land Stewardship Committee ………………………………………174

Personnel Board …………………………………………………… 125

Planning Board ……………………………………………………. 178

Police Department ………………………………………………… 158

Public Works, Department ………………………………………… 165

Recreation Commission …………………………………………….189

School Departments:

Carlisle Public School …………………………………………… 207

Carlisle School Building Committee ……………………………… 210

Concord-Carlisle Regional High School:

Superintendent of Schools ………………………………………… 218

Concord-Carlisle School Committee……………………………… 222

Concord-Carlisle Scholarship Fund ……………………………… 227

Long Term Capital Requirements Committee …………………… 123

Minuteman Regional Vocational High School …………………… 232

Selectmen, Board of ……………………………………………… 62

Town Accountant ………………………………………………… 67

Town Clerk ………………………………………………………. 16

Town Counsel …………………………………………………… 65

Town Officials, Appointed ……………………………………… 6

Town Officials, Elected ………………………………………… 5

Town Tax Collector …………………………………………….. 120

Town Treasurer …………………………………………………. 119

Trails Committee ………………………………………………… 193

Youth Commission ……………………………………………… 196


Zoning Board of Appeals ………………………………………… 153




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