1, Lázaro Gomes do Nascimento 1, Cícero Francisco Bezerra Felipe



Yüklə 0.52 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/4
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü0.52 Mb.
  1   2   3   4

Review

Analgesic Potential of Essential Oils

José Ferreira Sarmento-Neto

1

, Lázaro Gomes do Nascimento

1

, Cícero Francisco Bezerra Felipe

2

and Damião Pergentino de Sousa

1,

*

Received: 7 November 2015 ; Accepted: 26 November 2015 ; Published: 23 December 2015

Academic Editor: Maurizio Battino

1

Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, CEP 58.051-900 João



Pessoa-PB, Brazil; ferreira_system@hotmail.com (J.F.S.-N.); lazarofarm2@gmail.com (L.G.N.)

2

Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, CEP 58.051-900 João Pessoa-PB,



Brazil; cicero@dbm.ufpb.br

*

Correspondance: sousadam@yahoo.com; Tel.: +55-833-216-7347



Abstract:

Pain is an unpleasant sensation associated with a wide range of injuries and diseases,

and affects approximately 20% of adults in the world. The discovery of new and more effective

drugs that can relieve pain is an important research goal in both the pharmaceutical industry and

academia. This review describes studies involving antinociceptive activity of essential oils from

31 plant species. Botanical aspects of aromatic plants, mechanisms of action in pain models and

chemical composition profiles of the essential oils are discussed. The data obtained in these studies

demonstrate the analgesic potential of this group of natural products for therapeutic purposes.



Keywords:

essential oils; aromatic plants; natural products; analgesic; antinociceptive; pain;

formalin; monoterpenes; phenylpropanoids; medicinal plants

1. Introduction

Pain is an unpleasant sensation usually caused by intense or damaging stimuli. It is also

defined as an unpleasant sensory or emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue

damage [


1

]. Pain is described as a multidimensional experience with many components involved

and having motivational, emotional, sensory-discriminative, affective and cognitive aspects [

2

,



3

].

To assess pain and preclinically evaluate analgesic drugs, many irritating chemical agents can be



used as nociceptive stimuli [

3

,



4

]. They induce a tonic pain state, which is evaluated by behavioral

scoring. In the writhing test, the irritating agents are administered intraperitoneally, inducing a

behavior stereotypical of abdominal contractions, which are quantified [

3

]. The formalin test in mice



is a valid and reliable model of nociception, being sensitive for various classes of analgesic drugs.

Hunskaar and Hole [

5

] described the test for use in mice. The response to formalin stimulus was



studied during the first hour after formalin injection and an “early response” or a “late response”

were described. A similar time course has also been observed in the original study in rats and two

types of pain were postulated: a short-lasting pain caused by a direct effect on nociceptors, followed

by a longer lasting pain due to inflammation [

6

]. Nociceptive tests may use chemical, electrical,



mechanical, or thermal stimuli [

3

]. The hot-plate test is commonly used to investigate nociception



and analgesia in rodents. The standard method as described by Woolfe and MacDonald [

7

] and



modified by Eddy et al. [

8

], records latency for nociceptive responses in animals placed on a plate



and kept at a constant temperature, usually about 55

˝

C. The analgesic effects of morphine and other



narcotic analgesics are easily identified using this test. The tail flick is one of the oldest nociceptive

tests [


9

]. The tail flick is a spinal reflex, but it is subject to supraspinal influences [

10

,

11



]. The test

is highly sensitive to opiates [

3

]. Following tissue damage, as in autoimmune diseases, or with



exposure to irritating agents, the immune system releases inflammatory mediators that activate and

Molecules 2016, 21, 20; doi:10.3390/molecules21010020

www.mdpi.com/journal/molecules


Molecules 2016, 21, 20

2 of 29


sensitize the nociceptive system [

12

]. Some inflammatory pain models rely on the administration of



substances that induce an immune response (carrageenan, zymozan) [

13

], or on administration of



these inflammatory mediators themselves [

4

].



Sometimes for the diagnosis of several diseases, pain is the only symptom. Throughout the

history, man has used many forms of therapy for pain relief, among which, medicinal plants are

highlighted due to their widespread and popular use. An example is Papaver somniferum, from which

morphine was isolated. Though morphine is considered the prototype of opioid analgesics, it presents

considerable side effects such as respiratory depression, sleepiness, decreased gastrointestinal

motility, nausea and endocrine and autonomic nervous systems disorders [

14

]. The discovery of



natural compounds that have similar analgesic activity, yet with fewer side effects is pertinent.

Plants producing essential oils belong to various genera distributed within 60 families. Selected

families such as Alliaceae, Apiaceae, Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, Myrtaceae, Poaceae and Rutaceae are

well known for their ability to produce essential oils of industrial and medicinal value [

15

,

16



].

Essential oils extracted from plants are highly concentrated mixtures of chemicals, both volatile

and hydrophobic. The main chemical constituents present in essential oils are the monoterpenes,

sesquiterpenes, and phenylpropanoids [

14

]. Many essential oils present diverse pharmacological



properties, such as antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, hypnotic, anxiolytic, or anticancer [

14

,



17

,

18



].

Recent studies have highlighted the monoterpenes present in certain essential oils, such as menthol,

linalool [

19

], limonene [



20

], myrcene [

21

] and 1,8-cineole [



22

]. Such essential oils have presented

biological activities in differing animal models that include analgesic-like activity [

23

]. The objective



of this work was to analyze studies involving the essential plant oils present in species with

antinociceptive activity in animal models of nociception.



2. Methodology

The search was conducted in the scientific database PubMed, focusing on works published

during the last six years (January 2009 to December 2014). The data were selected using the following

terms: “essential oils” and “antinociceptive” or “analgesic” as well as the names of experimental

models of nociception in animals such as “writhing”, “formalin”, “tail-flick”, “tail immersion” and

“hot plate model”.



3. Results and Discussion

A large number of behavioral observation methods have been developed in order to study

both nociception and the action of various analgesic drugs in animals [

5

,



24

]. In the present work,

the antinociceptive activities of essential oils were evaluated in rats and/or mice (Table

1

). A lack



of clinical studies was observed due to the need for more extensive pre-clinical investigations on

toxicity and safety of such essential oils. Acetic acid-induced writhing was performed in 72.2% of the

studies, followed by formalin (66.7%), hot plate (27.8%), tail flick (11.1%) and tail immersion (5.6%)

tests. The carrageenan test associated with inflammatory pain was present in 22.2% of the studies.

According to the criteria used in the present work, we selected 31 plant species that produce essential

oils and which were tested for antinociceptive activity (Table

1

).


Molecules 2016, 21, 20

3 of 29


Table 1.

Plants essential oils with analgesic-like activity.



Plant Specie

Major Constituent

Animal Model

Mechanism of Action

Reference

Bunium persicum

γ

-Terpinene (46.1%)



Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin

Peripheral and central

[

25

]



Citrus limon

Limonene (52.77%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin, Hot-plate

Central


[

26

]



Cymbopogon citrates

Myrcene (27.83%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Tail-flick

Not informed

[

27

]



Cymbopogon winterianus

Geraniol (40.06%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin, Hot-plate

Peripheral and central

[

28

]



Eucalyptus citriodora

Citronellal (83.50%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Tail-flick

Not informed

[

27

]



Eugenia caryophyllata

Eugenol (87.34%)

Formalin, Tail-flick

Opioid


[

29

]



Heracleum persicum

Hexyl butyrate (56.5%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin

Peripheral

[

30

]



Hofmeisteria schaffneri

Hofmeisterin III

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Hot-plate

Opioid


[

31

]



Hyptis fruticosa

1,8-Cineole (18.70% in leaves)

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin

Peripheral and central

[

32

]



α

-Pinene (20.51% in flowers)

Hyptis pectinata

β

-Caryophyllene (40.90%)



Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin, Hot-plate

Peripheral and central (opioid, nitrergic and cholinergic)

[

33

]



Illicum lanceolatum

Myristicin (17.63%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings

Peripheral

[

34

]



Lippia gracilis

Thymol (24.08%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings

Peripheral

[

35

]



Carvacrol (44.43%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin, Hot-plate

Peripheral and central (opioid, nitrergic and cholinergic)

[

36



]

Matricaria recutita

α

-Bisabolol oxide B (25.5%)



Carrageenan-induced mechanical hypernociception

Peripheral

[

37

]



Mentha x villosa

Piperitenone oxide

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin, Hot-plate,

Tail-flick

Peripheral

[

38



]

Nepeta crispa

Not informed

Formalin, Tail-flick

Not informed

[

39



]

Ocimum basilicum

Linalool (69.54%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin, Hot-plate

Peripheral and Central (opioid)

[

40



]

Ocimum gratissimum

Eugenol (67.17%)

Formalin, Hot-plate

Central (opioid)

[

41



]

Ocimum micranthum

(E)-methyl cinnamate (33.6%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin, Hot-plate

Peripheral

[

42



]

Peperomia serpens

(E)-Nerolidol (38.0%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin, Hot-plate

Peripheral

[

43



]

Pimenta pseudocaryophyllus

Neral (27.59%) Geranial (36.49%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings

Peripheral

[

44



]

Piper alyreanum

Caryophyllene oxide (11.5%)

Formalin


Peripheral

[

45



]

Satureja hortensis

γ

-Terpinen (50.5%)



Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin

Peripheral

[

25

]



Senecio rufinervis

Germacrene (40.19%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Hot-plate

Peripheral and central

[

46

]



Tetradenia riparia

14-hydroxy-9-epi-caryophyllene

(18.27%–24.36%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings

Not informed

[

47



]

Teucrium stocksianum

δ

-Cadinene (12.92%)



Acetic acid-induced writhings

Not informed

[

48

]



Ugni myricoides

α

-Pinene (52.1%)



Carrageenan-induced mechanical hypernociception;

CFA-induced mechanical hypernociception; Partial

ligation of sciatic nerve

Not informed

[

49

]



Valeriana wallichii

δ

-Guaiene (10%)



Acetic acid-induced writhings, Tail-flick

Peripheral

[

50

]



Xylopia laevigata

γ

-Muurolene (17.78%)



Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin

Peripheral

[

51

]



Vanillosmopsis arborea

α

-Bisabolol (70%)



Eye wiping (corneal nociception) Formalin

Peripheral and Central (TRVP1 cholinergic, adrenergic and

serotoninergic)

[

52



]

Zingiber oficinalle

Zingiberene (31.08%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings

Peripheral

[

53



]

Zingiber zerumbet

Zerumbone (36.12%)

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin, Hot-plate

Peripheral and central (opioid)

[

54



]

Not informed

Acetic acid-induced writhings, Formalin

Peripheral and Central (TRVP1 glutamatergic, nitrergic and

ATP-sensitive K

+

channel blockade)



[

55

]



Molecules 2016, 21, 20

4 of 29


3.1. Bunium persicum Essential Oil

Bunium persicum (Boiss) B. Fedtsh is a grassy plant of the Apiaceae family with the common

name of wild Caraway. The fruits contain about 2% (w/v) essential oil; caryophyllene, γ-terpinene

and cuminyl acetate are the major components [

56

]. In the study by Hajhashemi [



25

], GC/MS


analysis identified gamma-terpinene (46.1%) as the main component present in the essential oil of

the fruits. The oil (at 100, 200 and 400 µL/Kg, p.o.) was tested in animal models of nociception

and presented antinociceptive activity in the acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin (both phases)

tests. According to Hajhashemi [

25

], the antinociceptive effect of Bunium persicum (Boiss) B. Fedtsh



essential oil (fruit) depends on central mechanisms. Acetic acid acts indirectly by inducing the

release of endogenous mediators, which stimulate nociceptive neurons sensitive to non-steroidal

anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and opioids [

57

]. Also, in the formalin test, the early phase



seemed to be caused predominantly by C-fiber activation due to the peripheral stimulus, while the

late phase appeared to be dependent on the combination of an inflammatory reaction in the peripheral

tissue and functional changes in the ventral horn of the spinal cord [

25

]. Since essential oil of B.



persicum was effective in suppression of the first phase of formalin test, it seems that at least a part of

analgesic activity of B. persicum fruits is mediated centrally [

25

].

3.2. Citrus limon Essential Oil



The plants of the family Rutaceae (with approximately 2000 species) comprise 150 genera,

the largest of which are Citrus (about 70 species) and Terminalia (about 200 species). Citrus limon

(L.) Burm is a plant from north-northeastern Brazil and is known by the popular name of

“limoeiro” [

58

,

59



]. In the study by Campêlo et al. [

26

], essential oil from the leaves of Citrus limon



(50, 100 and 150 mg/Kg, p.o.) was tested using acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin and the

hot plate test. GC-MS analysis revealed a mixture of monoterpenes, with limonene (at 52.77%)

being the main component of the oil. Administration of this essential oil reduced the number of

writhings, significantly inhibited the licking response to the formalin (only in the first phase of the

test) and prolonged the delay in response time when mice were subjected to nociceptive stimulus in

the hot plate test. It is important to note that the antinociceptive effect of the Citrus limon essential

oil in the acetic acid-induced writhings and hot plate tests was partially reversed by naloxone

(1.5 mg/Kg, i.p.), an opioid antagonist. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction is a standard,

simple and sensitive test for measuring analgesia induced by both opioids and peripherally acting

analgesics [

24

]. However, in the formalin test, the first phase is generated in the periphery through



the activation of nociceptive neurons by direct action of formalin. The second phase occurs through

the activation of the ventral horn neurons at the spinal cord level. Morphine, a typical narcotic drug,

inhibits nociception in both phases, but drugs with peripheral activity such as indomethacin and

corticosteroids, inhibit only the second phase [

60

].

3.3. Cymbopogon citrates and Cymbopogon winterianus Essential Oils



The Cymbopogon genus (Poaceae), found in tropical countries, is composed of more than

100


species [

61

]. About 56 of these are aromatic and some have medicinal, pharmacological



and industrial importance [

62

]. Two species of Cymbopogon: Cymbopogon nardus (Jamarosa) and



C. winterianus (Java citronella) are known to have similar volatile oil scents and medicinal uses, but

they reveal different contents. GC-MS analysis has shown that myrcene (27.83%), geranial (27.0%)

and neral (19.9%) were the major components present in the essential oil of the leaves of Cymbopogon

citrates [

27

]. This essential oil (2000 and 3000 mg/Kg, p.o.) was tested in the acetic acid-induced



writhings and tail flick models of nociception. Despite the plant material presenting antinociceptive

effect, the authors did not suggest any mechanism for the action of the oil. HPLC and GC-MS analyses

developed [

28

] indicated the presence of geraniol (40.06%) as the major component present in the



essential oil of the leaves of Cymbopogon winterianus. Gbenou et al. [

27

] tested the plant material (at



Molecules 2016, 21, 20

5 of 29


50, 100 and 200 mg/Kg, p.o.) in three different animal models of nociception (acetic acid-induced

writhings, hot plate and formalin tests). In the acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin tests, the

essential oil significantly reduced the number of writhings and paw licking times (in both phases).

In contrast, the material did not alter the latency time for mice licking of the rear paws in the hot-plate

test. It is known that acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing causes algesia through liberation

of endogenous substances, which excites pain nerve endings [

63

]. Increased levels of PGE



2

and


PGF

in the peritoneal fluid have been reported as responsible for the pain sensations caused by



intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid [

64

]. Based on these results, the authors assume that the



mode of action of the essential oil might involve, at least in part, a peripheral mechanism. In addition,

the formalin model of nociception discriminates pain in its central and peripheral components [

65

].

The test consists of two different phases separated in time: the first one is generated in the periphery



through activation of nociceptive neurons through direct formalin action and the second phase occurs

through the activation of ventral horn neurons at the spinal cord level. Morphine, a typical narcotic

drug, inhibits nociception in both phases [

60

], but drugs with peripheral action, such as indomethacin



and corticosteroids, inhibit only the second phase. Moreover, drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and

paracetamol, which inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, block only the second phase of the formalin

test [

6

,



24

]. Finally, the authors conclude that mild analgesics (such as aspirin) lack antinociceptive

action in thermal tests such as the hot-plate test, but have significant antinociceptive activity in

tonic tests (writhing and formalin tests), which are characterized by direct chemical stimulation of

nociceptors. Since it has been reported that thermal and tonic tests elicit selective stimulation of A-γ

fibers and C fibers, respectively [

66

], essential oil from the leaves of Cymbopogon winterianus may



interfere with the transmission of both fibers, or a single common pathway.

3.4. Eucalyptus citriodora Essential Oil

Eucalyptus citriodora is an aromatic medicinal plant species belonging to the family of

Myrtaceae. The antinociceptive effect of the essential oil extracted from the leaves of Eucalyptus

citriodora was assessed [

27

]. GC-MS analysis indicates that citronellal (83.50%) is the chief constituent



of the essential oil. The essential oil (at 1200 and 1800 mg/Kg, p.o.) was tested in the acetic

acid-induced writhings and tail-flick models of nociception. Despite the fact that in both tests the

plant material presented antinociceptive effect, the authors did not suggest any mechanism for the

antinociceptive action of the oil.

3.5. Eugenia caryophyllata Essential Oil

Eugenia caryophyllata belongs to the Myrtaceae family [

67

]. The major component of Eugenia



caryophyllata essential oil is eugenol with lower amounts of betacaryophyllene and eugenyl

acetate [

68

,

69



]. In work developed by Halder et al. [

29

], GC-MS analysis confirmed that eugenol



(87.34%) is the main compound present in the essential oil extracted from the dried flower buds of

Eugenia caryophyllata. In this work, Halder et al. [

29

] tested the oil (0.025, 0.050 and 0.1 mL/Kg, i.p.)



in formalin and tail-flick tests. In the formalin test, Eugenia caryophyllata essential oil (0.1 mL/Kg)

was effective in reducing the duration of licks in the first phase. However, in the second phase,

the pain response was reduced at all the doses. The plant material was observed to show variable

effects in modifying pain response in the tail-flick experiment. At the 0.1 mL/Kg dose, the material

significantly decreased the tail-flick latency thus showing hyperalgesic effect. On the contrary, the

dose of 0.025 mL/kg increased the mean tail-flick latency compared to control group. It is important

to emphasize that this effect was reversed by naloxone (1 mg/Kg, i.p.). It is well established that the

tail-flick experiment evaluates the central mechanisms of pain relief, as observed in the case of opioids

like morphine [

70

]. It has been demonstrated in previous studies that eugenol (the chief constituent of



the oil) probably acts by both opioid receptors and alpha adrenergic receptors [

71

]. Morphine which



acts on the opioidergic receptors, at low dosages (subanalgesic) produces an enhanced sensitivity to

the noxious stimulus (hyperalgesia) in the tail-flick test [

72

]. It is possible that Eugenia caryophyllata



Molecules 

  1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə