1 nta Drive by Mat GilfedderThis



Yüklə 111.79 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü111.79 Kb.

         

1

nta Drive by Mat GilfedderThis 

 

                                                        

 

Postal Address: P.O. Box 8663  

Alice Springs, Northern Territory 

0871 

 

Web site:

 

http://www.alicefieldnaturalists.org.au 



Email:

 

contact@alicefieldnaturalists.org.au



 

 

 



December 2016 

 ANN Special 

 

Next meeting will be held Wed 8 Feb 2017 at 7:00 PM at 

Higher Education Building at Charles Darwin University. 

The next newsletter will be published in February 2017.  

Please ensure photos and articles get to Barb by 28 January 

2017. 

bjfedders@gmail.com



 

Star  of  Bethlehem,  Calectasia  narragara  is  a  woody  perennial  which  has  a    

rhizomatous  root  and  forms  clumps.  With  a  Christmas  name  like  that,  I  couldn’t  

resist  putting  it  on  the  December  newsletter  cover.    One  of  the  stunning  flowers  

enjoyed  by  ANN  get-­‐together  participants  in  WA.  

Photo:  Rosalie  Breen  



 

Alice Springs Field Naturalists Club 

Newsletter 


Alice  Springs  Field  Naturalists  Club  

Page  2  

December  2016  ANN  

 

The  Australian  Naturalists  Network  get  together  in  October  2016  was  



hosted  by  Western  Australian  Naturalists’  Club.  

ANN  experience  of  Western  Australia  

by  Jocelyn  Davies    

The  Western  Australian  Naturalists’  Club  hosted  ANN  2016  with  aplomb.    ANN  stands  for  Australian  Naturalists  Network,

2

 which  



has  a  get  together  every  two  years.  ANN16  was  held  from  1

st

 to  10



th

 October  together  with  a  great  offering  of  pre-­‐and  post-­‐  

tours.    Just  over  80  people  attended  ANN16  and  another  25  or  more  local  people  were  involved  as  guides  and  evening  speakers.    

It  was  a  great  credit  to  the  organisers  that  the  itineraries  for  each  day’s  field  trip  went  so  smoothly.    As  far  as  I  know,  no  one  

missed  a  bus  and  no  one  missed  out  on  lunch,  and  the  special  food  requirements  and  requests  of  various  people  were  all  met  

happily.    

The  ANN  symbol,  an  Echidna,  is  a  good  choice  because,  like  many  naturalists,  Echidnas  are  somewhat  cryptic  as  well  as  quirky.    

Also  like  naturalists  they  are  found  all  over  Australia  in  diverse  habitats.    Interstate  ANN16  participants  came  from  Tasmania  

(where  the  previous  ANN  was  held),  Victoria,  and  Queensland  including  a  big  contingent  from  Chinchilla  where  the  ANN10  was  

held.  From  Alice  Springs  Rhondda  Tomlinson,  Rosalie  Breen,  Charlie  Carter,  Deb  Clarke  and  I  participated.  Leoni  Read,  who  is  

now  living  in  Tasmania,  was  also  given  honorary  Alice  affiliation  by  the  rest  of  us.    It  was  notable  that  four  of  the  five  current  

Alice  residents  who  participated  in  ANN16  live  in  the  same  street  –  one  could  be  forgiven  for  concluding  ours  is  a  very  small  

town.      

South  West  WA  is  a  botanical  province  with  high  endemism  and  a  great  proliferation  of  plant  species.  The  meeting  was  well  

timed  for  spring  flowering  and  this  spring  was  cool  with  plenty  of  rain.    This  helped  to  ensure  that  the  floral  displays  were  

superlative.    Each  day  of  the  gathering  had  field  trips  in  which  we  were  introduced  to  a  great  cross  section  of  the  local  floral  

diversity,  as  well  as  to  reading  the  landforms  and  understanding  the  deep  geological  time  span  of  the  region.    Most  participants  

stayed  at  the  Woodman  Point  Recreation  Camp,  which  once  quarantined  passengers  off  ships  who  arrived  in  Freemantle  with  

notified  communicable  diseases.    We  were  comfortably  accommodated  two  to  a  room  with  shared  bathrooms,  although  

elephants  heard  tromping  the  corridors  at  night  were  sometimes  a  little  disturbing.          

Perth  sprawls  along  the  coast  –  lots  of  its  new  suburbs  have  chased  sea  breezes  and  sea  views.    Our  first  day  was  in  coastal  

vegetation  remnants  in  northern  Perth  in  the  satellite  city  of  Joondalup.      Coastcare  groups,  chaired  by  Dr  Marjorie  Apthorpe  

and  the  ANN16  Treasurer  Don  Poynton,  are  working  tirelessly  to  conserve  and  manage  a  narrow  coastal  strip  that  includes  

Banksia  woodlands  recently  recognised  as  an  endangered  ecological  community;  Melaleuca  heathlands;  and  good  habitat  for  

Fairy-­‐wrens  and  Quendas  (just  one  of  the  local  mammal  names  we  

learnt:  the  Southern  Brown  Bandicoot,  (Isoodon  obesulus).    Judging  by  

the  number  of  walkers  and  joggers  on  the  footpaths  that  the  local  

council  has  built  through  the  coastal  reserve,  this  thin  green  line  of  

bushland  is  much  appreciated  by  many.    When  people  in  the  multi-­‐

million  dollar  ‘mcmansions’  that  are  closest  to  the  coast  are  suspected  of  

chopping  trees  down  to  improve  their  view,  council  erects  billboard-­‐sized  

signs  in  front  of  their  houses  asking  anyone  with  information  on  tree  

vandalism  to  report  it.    I  liked  that.    Nevertheless,  more  and  more  and  

more  of  the  small  coastal  bushland  areas—whether  or  not  they  contain  

threatened  ecological  communities—are  disappearing  under  new  

suburbs  on  the  one  hand,  coastal  erosion  on  the  other,  and  multiple  

weed  species  in-­‐between.    Not  to  mention  Phytophthora  dieback.    

Phytophthora  cinnamomi    is  a  colourless  microbe,  a  fungus  that  lives  in  

soil  and  in  plant  tissues  and  also  can  move  around  in  water.    A  serious  

plant  pathogen  worldwide,  it  almost  certainly  was  introduced  to  WA  

shortly  after  colonisation.  It  kills  trees  and  shrubs.  Plants  in  the  family  

Proteacea  (including  all  those  endemic  WA  Banksias)  and  Jarrah  

(Eucalyptus  marginata)  are  among  the  most  susceptible  but  over  40%  of  

native  plant  species  in  South  West  WA  are  considered  to  be  at  risk.    

Phytophthora  is  a  very  serious  problem  in  WA’s  most  humid  climates  

(>800mm  pa),  in  parts  of  the  South  West.    Its  impact  in  these  regions  is  

exacerbated  when  plants  are  drought-­‐stressed.    It  is  also  a  serious  

problem  in  moist  micro  habitats  of  drier  regions,  such  as  in  run-­‐on  areas  

around  the  base  of  the  granite  rocks  that  emerge  along  the  Darling  

escarpment  and  in  the  southern  wheat  belt.  No  cure  exists  although  

                                                        

2

https://australiannaturalistsnetwork.wordpress.com/



 

 Banksia  grandis,  which  is  a  tree  growing  up  to  10m  high,  in  

coastal  woodland  adjoining  Perth’s  northern  beach  

suburbs  

Alice  Springs  Field  Naturalists  Club  

Page  3  

December  2016  ANN  

 

injections  of  phosphite,  a  salt  of  



phosphoric  acid,  have  been  found  

to  protect  individual  plants.  This  is  

ironic  given  that  phosphorus  

toxicity  characterises  some  of  the  

more  susceptible  plants,  which  

are  adapted  to  growing  in  very  

low  P  soils.    However  phosphite  

injections  are  obviously  not  a  

broad-­‐scale  solution  and  WA  is  

doing  a  lot  to  educate  people  and  

to  manage  the  spread  of  dieback

3

.    



In  many  of  the  bushland  areas  we  

visited,  our  vigilant  guides  and  

bus  drivers  set  up  boot  cleaning  

stations.    Still,  we  wondered  how  

effective  this  is,  especially  since  

many  visitors  to  these  places  

would  not  take  the  same  

precautions.    In  any  case,  the  

organism  is  spreading  

autonomously,  even  uphill  at  a  

meter  a  year  via  root  to  root  

contact  between  infected  plants,  

and  faster  downhill  due  to  water  

flows


4

.  How  much  will  forests  and  

understories  change  as  this  

dieback  spreads  and  special  plants  

are  lost?  

On  the  second  ANN  day  we  

travelled  over  the  Darling  escarpment  to  Wongamine  Nature  Reserve,  200  hectares  of  woodland  growing  in  the  lateritised  soils  

formed  in  the  deeply  weathered  granites  of  the  Yilgarn  Craton.  More  than  200  species  of  native  plants  grow  in  the  reserve,  

which  is  a  bush  remnant  surrounded  by  rolling  hills  that  are  pretty  much  cleared  of  native  vegetation,  growing  Wheat  and  

Canola.    The  understory,  below  Wandoo  and  Powder  Wandoo  (Eucalyptus  wandoo  and  E.  ascendens)  and  seven  other  Eucalypts,  

had  a  huge  diversity  of  plants  all  in  full  flower  showing  off  pinks,  yellows  and  oranges.  Proteaceae  species  growing  there  

included  five  Grevilleas,  seven  Hakeas  and  ten  Banksias  while  there  were  five  Hibbertia  species  (Guinea  Flowers)  and  nine  

Gastrolobium  species  (Peas/Poison  peas).    The  ground  cover  was  also  a  treat  with  myriad  kinds  of  Orchids,  loads  of  different  

Drosera  and  Trigger  Plants  (Stylidium  spp).  Apparently,  150  species  

of  Trigger  Plant  occur  in  southern  WA.  No  wonder  there  seemed  to  

be  no  end  to  their  diverse  and  elegant  forms  and  colours.                        



(Two    Trigger  Plants  pictured  here  in  Wongamine  Nature  Reserve)

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

                                                        

3

 For example, see 



https://www.dwg.org.au/

 

4



Department of Conservation and Land Management. 2003: Phytophthora cinnamomi and disease caused by it. Vol 1: 

Management Guidelines.  

https://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/images/documents/conservation-management/pests-diseases/disease-

risk-areas/Phytophthora_cinnamomi_and_disease_caused_by_it-_Vol._1_Management_Guidelines_.pdf

 

 

This  unhealthy  Banksia,  on  a  hillside  in  the  Ellis  Brook  valley,  looked  to  be  suffering  Phytophthora  



dieback.    It  was  close  to  a  boot  cleaning  station  and  I  wondered  if  the  pestilence  had  already  spread  

past  that  biosecurity  measure

 

Alice  Springs  Field  Naturalists  Club  

Page  4  

December  2016  ANN  

 

One  other  highlight  of  this  day  was  the  morning  and  afternoon  tea  



catered  by  the  CWA  in  the  nearby  old,  community-­‐spirited  town  of  

Toodyay.    Needless  to  say  the  treats  were  abundant  and  very  tasty.    

While  enjoying  CWA  cakes,  we  were  visited  by  an  orphaned  Woylie  

(Brush-­‐tailed  Bettong,  Bettongia  ogilbyi)  and  a  Black-­‐gloved  Wallaby  

(Macropus  irma)  who  were  both  being  raised  by  Toodyay  naturalists  

and  farmers  Brian  and  Chris  Foley.      

Another  mammal  highlight  of  the  day  almost  slipped  through  

unremarked,  except  by  Alice  people.    When  Leoni    Read  found  some  

scat  that  contained  termite  remains,  she  asked  one  local  guide  if  

they  might  be  numbat  (Myrmecobius  fasciatus).      

“I  wish”,  he  said,  “but  they  are  Echidna”.      

A  little  later,  Leoni  showed  Charlie  Carter  the  scat.  Charlie  was  

adamant  they  were  not  the  very  distinctive-­‐shaped  scat  that  

Echidna  make.  I  heard  the  story  later  that  night  and  then  showed  

Leoni  and  Charlie  a  photo  of  Numbat  scat  I  had  collected  some  

weeks  earlier  in  Boyagin  Rock  Nature  Reserve,  about  150  km  east  of  

Perth,  which  includes  a  reintroduced  population  of  Numbats.    Leoni  

and  Charlie  agreed  that  the  scat  that  she  had  found  really  did  look  

like  it  was  from  a  Numbat.    Perhaps  the  persistence  or  re-­‐

colonisation  of  Boyagin  by  Numbats  is  not  as  far-­‐fetched  as  it  might  

seem  given  that  the  Woylie  that  Brian  and  Chris  Foley  were  hand-­‐

rearing  was  an  orphan  from  a  population  that  had  persisted  in  the  

area,  against  all  odds.  Also  the  Wandoo/Powder  Wandoo  

open  forest  in  Wongamine  NR  is  prime  Numbat  habitat!  

 

Tuesday  was  our  trip  to  Rottnest  Island.  The  voyage  took  



about  half  an  hour  on  a  high-­‐speed  passenger  ferry  from  

Fremantle,  with  the  distant  company  of  some  Humpback  

Whales.  We  split  into  two  groups  to  either  bus  around  the  

island  or  walk,  swapping  activities  in  the  afternoon.      

My  highlights  while  walking  in  a  small  group  with  Mike  and  Mandy  

Bamford  and  looking  out  for  birds  included  a  very  close  up  study  of  a  

Western  Gerygone,  and  the  sight  of  a  pair  of  Shelducks  with  a  grand  

total  of  18  half-­‐grown  young.    Mike  suggested  that  the  Shelduck  pair  

might  have  collected  some  of  this  brood  from  other  Shelduck  nests,  

though  we  wondered  why  they  would  do  this.    To  boost  their  prestige  

with  the  other  Shelducks?    Or  as  insurance  in  case  some  of  the  young  

are  predated?      

 

Toodyay  naturalist  and  farmer  Brian  Foley  with  an  orphaned  

juvenile  Woylie  (Bettongia  ogilbyi)  that  he  has  been  hand-­‐

rearing  

 

Scat  left  by  foraging  numbats,  Boyagin  Rock  Nature  Reserve  (but  note  that  

the  left-­‐most  scat  is  less  definitely  Numbat  than  the  others).    The  Numbat  

is  WA’s  fauna  emblem  and  was  the  emblem  for  ANN16.  Numbat,  or  

Walpiti  in  Yankunyatjatjara  and  Pitjantjatjara,  used  to  also  occur  in  

central  Australia.    

 

Quokka, Rottnest Island. Cuteness factor: extreme.

 


Alice  Springs  Field  Naturalists  Club  

Page  5  

December  2016  ANN  

 

Walking  around  also  gave  us  a  chance  to  observe  the  island’s  Quokkas  (Setonix  brachyurus)  up  close.  Quokkas  also  persist  in  one  



or  two  places  on  the  mainland  but  are  hard  to  see,  whereas  on  the  island  they  are  not  at  all  shy.    Early  Europeans  described  the  

island  as  densely  wooded  Cypress  Pine  (Callitris  preissii),  Teatree  (Melaleuca  lanceolata)  and  Tuart  (Eucalyptus  gomphocephala),  

but  much  of  the  island  is  now  a  low  heathland,  maintained  by  Quokka  grazing.    Quokkas  have  to  be  fenced  out  where  tree  

revegetation  is  in  progress.    A  hurried  bus  trip  around  the  island’s  25km  perimeter  road  enabled  us  to  also  see  its  NZ  Fur  Seal  

colony,  rocks  where  Australian  Sea-­‐lions  haul  out,  and  pair  of  Osprey  on  the  nest  they  have  used  for  many  years  which  is  a  cone  

of  interlocked  sticks  more  than  a  metre  high  on  a  windswept  rocky  promontory.      

Wednesday  was  a  ‘rest  day’  with  local  walks  

in  the  morning  close  to  Woodman  Point,  and  

a  visit  to  Kanyana  Wildlife  Rehabilitation  

Centre  in  the  afternoon/evening.    This  busy  

not  for  profit  centre  was  established  by  

volunteers  and  continues  to  depend  of  

volunteers  and  donations  for  its  work  in  

treating  hundreds  of  orphaned  and  injured  

animals  each  year.    One  of  their  ancillary  

functions  is  education  for  which  they  keep  a  

small  number  of  animals  that  are  not  fit  for  

return  to  wild  living.    For  us,  as  for  hundreds  

of  school  kids  each  year,  it  was  a  chance  to  

see  some  special  species,  including  Red-­‐

tailed  Black  Cockatoo,  Echidna  and  Tawny  

Frogmouth,  up  very  close.    Kanyana  also  

manages  two  breeding  programs  for  

endangered  species,  Bilbies  and  Woylies,  as  

part  of  implementation  of  national  recovery  

plans.    Animals  bred  here  are  used  in  the  

restocking  of  those  WA  conservation  

reserves,  where  introduced  predators  are  

being  controlled,  efforts  that  are  extensive  

and  apparently  well-­‐resourced  on  both  

government-­‐managed  and  privately-­‐

managed  nature  reserves  in  WA.  

In  the  following  days  we  visited  several  bushland  reserves  close  to  

Perth.  Some  were  on  the  old  podsolised  Bassendean  sand  dunes  and  

in  the  perched  wetlands  of  these  and  younger  more  coastward  dune  

systems.  Others  were  in  the  granites  and  lateritic  soils  of  the  Darling  

scarp  and  its  foothills.    One  highlight  for  me  was  in  the  Ellis  Brook  

Valley:  a  great  show  by  a  Square-­‐tailed  Kite  being  harassed  by  a  

Goshawk.  The  valley  also  lived  up  to  its  reputation  as  a  fantastic  place  

for  wildflowers.    Another  highlight  was  learning  when  a  

Xanthorrhoea  is  not  a  Xanthorrhoea  –  the  answer  is  when  it’s  a  

Kingia!  The  leaves  and  trunk  of  Kingia  australis  look  very  much  like  



Xanthorrhoea  species,  which  are  extremely  common  in  the  bushland  

around  Perth.  But  the  Kingia  is  not  closely  related,  being  in  the  

endemic  Australian  (predominantly  Western  Australian)  family  

Dasypogonaceae.    

 

 Kingia  australis,  whose  leaves  and  trunk  resemble  Xanthorrhoea  spp  but  



which  is  not  closely  related  and  has  very  different,  ‘drumstick-­‐shaped’  

flowers.    

Getting  up  close  with  a  rescued  Red-­‐tailed  Black  Cockatoo  at  Kanyana  Wildlife  

Rehabilitation  Centre.    These  big  gum  nuts,  from  Marri  trees  (Corymbia  calophylla),  are  

food  for  several  parrot  species  each  of  which  leaves  a  different  pattern  of  chew  marks.  

 

Alice  Springs  Field  Naturalists  Club  

Page  6  

December  2016  ANN  

 

 



In  the  field  we  learned  from  people  who  were  both  naturalists  and  specialised  research  scientists.  In  one  Banksia  woodland  

remnant,  surrounded  by  suburbs  and  a  prospective  industrial  development,  we  learnt  from  plant  physiologist  Dr  Hans  Lambers  

about  mechanisms  that  enable  Banksias  to  prosper  in  extremely  nutrient  poor  soils.    Adaptations  include  channelling  all  the  

available  phosphorus  into  building  the  structure  of  new  shoots  and  leaves.    Activation  of  chlorophyll  production  and  

photosynthesis  is  delayed  in  those  new  tissues,  hence  they  show  red  colour.    The  next  day,  in  WA’s  oldest  protected  area,  John  

Forrest  National  Park,  geologist  Mike  Freeman  gave  a  great  explanation  of  the  development  of  the  lateritic  profile  of  the  Darling  

Scarp  during  millions  of  years  of  weathering  of  the  Yilgarn  Craton  granites.    He  then  guided  walkers  in  how  to  interpret  the  

parks’  geological  features  en-­‐route  to  one  of  the  two  waterfalls  we  visited  that  morning.    Mike  lived  and  worked  in  Alice  Springs  

for  a  decade  and  some  might  remember  him.    

Field  trips  on  this  ANN  were  complemented  by  fabulous  evening  talks  by  experts  in  their  field.    Kingsley  Dixon,  former  director  of  

Kings  Park  Botanical  Gardens,  opened  the  get  together  with  a  photographic  exploration  of  the  drivers  of  WA’s  extraordinary  

biodiversity.    Later  in  the  week,  David  Knowles  presented  amazing  photo-­‐montages  of  invertebrates  and  some  living  samples;  

and  Ron  Johnstone  introduced  us  to  the  world  of  WA’s  three  species  of  Black  Cockatoos,  their  adaptations  and  serious  

challenges  for  their  future  prosperity  including  competition  for  nest  sites  from  other  parrots  and  feral  bees.      

The  week  wound-­‐up  with  visits  to  some  Perth  icons  including  Kings  Park,  where  much  of  the  spectacle  of  diverse  WA  endemics  

in  rampant  flower  is  conveniently  arranged  in  families.    Another  visit  was  to  the  Shipwreck  Gallery  of  the  WA  Museum  in  

Fremantle.  Its  display  of  salvaged  boat  timber  and  relics  from  the  Dutch  East  India  Company  ship  Batavia,  which  ran  aground  on  

the  Houtman  Abrolhos  Islands  in  1629,  book-­‐ended  the  experiences  that  Rhondda,  Charlie,  Deb  and  I  had  had  when  we  visited  

the  Abrolhos  Islands  on  an  ANN16  field  trip  in  the  last  week  of  September.    The  story  of  the  massacre  of  more  than  a  hundred  

Batavia  passengers  by  some  of  the  ship’s  crew—mutineers—on  an  island  in  the  Abrolhos  archipelago  is  well  known  to  Western  

Australians.    Most  of  the  rest  of  us  only  knew  the  story  dimly,  if  at  all,  which  served  to  remind  us  that  WA  is  different  to  more  

eastern  parts  of  Australia  historically,  socially  and  culturally,  as  well  as  biologically.    

A  continuing  committee  was  elected  during  the  week  to  take  ANN  forward  to  the  next  get  together,  in  Victoria  in  two  years  

time.    Jeff  Campbell  was  elected  as  Chair.    Since  none  of  us  present  from  Alice  nominated  for  the  committee,  there  remains  an  

opportunity  for  others  from  Alice,  or  Darwin  or  elsewhere  in  the  NT,  to  do  so.    Most  of  the  work  of  organising  the  ANN  falls  to  

the  host  state/local  groups  with  the  national  committee  providing  oversight  and  continuity.  In  other  words,  the  role  of  NT  

representative  is  not  likely  to  be  onerous.        

For  all  its  great  experiences  and  good  organisation,  I  felt  there  was  a  missing  element  at  ANN16,  which  was  encouragement  and  

opportunity  for  those  present  to  think  collectively  about  the  future  of  ANN.    There  is  no  doubt  that  it  is  an  aging  network,  which  

means  it  has  a  short  future  unless  younger  people  join  in.  There  are  plenty  of  younger  people  involved  with  the  natural  

environment  but  they  are  less  involved  with  naturalist  groups  and  more  with  conservation  action,  environmental  advocacy,  

bushwalking,  bird  watching  and  in  para-­‐professional  roles.    ANN16  was  a  missed  opportunity  for  participants  to  share  their  

thoughts  about  whether  and  how  the  network  could  be  broadened,  strengthened  and  rejuvenated.  

From  left:    Two  of  the  three  species  of  Feather  Flower  (Verticordia  spp,  in  Myrtaceae)  that  grow  in  the  Ellis  Brook  valley.  The  flowers  of  V.  

huegellii  start  out  white  and  turn  pink  after  ferilization;  Chorizema  ilicifolium  (Holly  Flame-­‐pea)  in  John  Forrest  National  Park;  Lechenaultia  

biloba  in  Wongamine  Nature  Reserve  


Alice  Springs  Field  Naturalists  Club  

Page  7  

December  2016  ANN  

 

WHERE  TO  NEST  …  



OR  WHERE  NOT  TO  NEST?  

By  Rhondda  Tomlinson  

Being  birds,  you  would  think  it  would  be  easy  to  find  a  

suitable  nesting  place  in  such  a  remote  area  as  the  Abrolhos  

Islands  off  Geraldton,  Western  Australia.  

However,  Wooded  Island  as  you  can  see,  is  a  bit  crowded.  

 

East  Wallabi  Island  seemed  a  good  possibility  but  the  signs  for  



visitors  to  read  said  that  this  nest  (which  is  just  a  bump  on  the  

land  horizon)  is  more  than  40  years  old  and  has  been  

maintained  and  even  re-­‐built  by  several  different  pairs  of  

Osprey.  At  present  it  is  home  to  a  monogamous  pair  of  breeding  

Ospreys  who  use  the  nest  to  sleep,  breed  and  raise  their  young.  

The  nest  is  an  integral  part  of  their  life  cycle.    

This  does  not  solve  our  problem.  

 

Moving  on  to  West  Wallabi  Island,  we  found  an  abandoned  



nest.  However,  this  would  require  so  much  work  to  bring  it  

back  to  a  serviceable  condition.  Besides  those  tourists  and  

their  cameras  would  be  so  inconvenient.  

 

 



 

Pigeon  Island  may  provide  the  solution,  a  

friend  said,  as  they  had  just  moved  into  the  

area.    

Success  at  last,  even  though  you  might  not  

agree.    

The  local  fishermen  have  come  to  an  

arrangement  so  that  we  do  not  build  where  it  

is  inconvenient  for  them.  They  have  erected  

poles  with  sort  of  baskets  on  top.  We  are  free  

to  use  these  for  nesting  and  to  observe  our  

surroundings  from.    

We  are  sure  our  new  home  is  going  to  be  an  

ideal  spot  to  raise  

our  family.  


Alice  Springs  Field  Naturalists  Club  

Page  8  

December  2016  ANN  

 

 



BLUE  

by  Rosalie  Breen

 

Blue  is  my  favourite  colour.  At  the  ANN  get  together  in  

WA,  while  travelling  by  bus  on  excursions  looking  out  

the  window,  we  passed  clouds  of  intense  blue  on  the  

ground  among  the  shrubland  and  woodland.  It  made  a  

lasting  and  delightful  impression  on  me.    These  clouds  

were  bushes  of  blue  Lechenaultia  biloba,  plentiful  and  in  

many  different  habitats.    So  different  to  see  so  much  

blue  in  the  bush.    In  central  Australia,  we  have  

Lechenaultia  divaricarta,  a  low  straggly  wiry  looking  bush  

with  no  leaves  and  yellow  and  white  flowers.    WA’s  is  a  

prostrate  herbaceous  plant,  the  green  leaves  

complementing  the  blue  of  the  many  five  petalled  

flowers.    Each  of  these  corolla  lobes  are  divided  into  two  

joined  lobes.    Quite  distinctive.  

So  that  started  a  mission  to  take  note  of  more  blue.    The  

most  obvious  were  the  humans  many  of  whom  were  

wearing  blue  jackets,  a  badge  of  Perth  ANN  and  easy  to  

spot.    Seriously  though,  there  are  many  species  of  



Dampiera  which  are  blue  and  also  belong  to  the  

Goodeniaceae  family.    (CA’s  Goodenias  are  almost  

always  yellow).          

From  the  top:  Blue  leschenaultia,  Lechnanaultia  biloba:  

a  wander  in  the  Wongamine  ;  Blue  Sqill,  Chamaescilla  



corymbosa;  Dampiera  sp.  and  a  Common  Hovea,  

Hovea  trisperma.    

 

 



NB.  The  correct  spelling  of  the  generic  name,  Lechenaultia,  

is  open  to  some  argument.  It  was  named  after  Leschenaultia  

de  la  Tour,  a  botanist  who  visited  Australia  in  1802-­‐3.  

However,  when  Robert  Brown,  an  early  botanist  first  

published  the  name  he  spelt  it  Lechenaultia,  omitting  the  's'.  

The  spelling  without  the  's'  is  considered  valid  by  Australian  

taxonomists.  However,  The  ‘s’  is  often  included  in  the  

common  name.  



Alice  Springs  Field  Naturalists  Club  

Page  9  

December  2016  ANN  

 

 



Alice  Springs  has  the  Orange  Spade  Flower.    WA  trying  to  go  one  

better,  has  blue  Hybanthus  calycinus,  called  appropriately  Wild  

Violet.  We  have  a  stunning  pink  Calytrix  ,  WA  has  one  that  is  

smothered  in  blue  flowers  with  five  petals  and  prominent  yellow  

stamens  turning  red  with  age,  (probably    Calytrix  fraseri).    Other  new  

ones  were  the  Hoveas,  a  number  of  species  of  shrubs  with  clusters  

of  blue  or  purple  pea  flowers.    Tantalizing  and  very  photogenic  was  

Blue  Squill,  Chamaescilla  corymbosa.    It  is  a  lily  of  sorts  with  a  

multiple  of  three  petals.  Perhaps  the  prettiest  flower  was  Blue  

Tinsel  Lily,  Calectasia  narragara,  blue  with  a  splash  of  red  and  

yellow  anthers.  

(see  photo  on  front  cover)

 The  name  comes  from  

Greek  calos  meaning  beautiful,  and  ectasia,  meaning  stretching  

out,  referring  to  the  star-­‐shaped  petals.    Narragara  is  a  composite  

Nyoongar  (the  local  aboriginal  inhabitants)  name  for  a  star,  chosen  

for  its  common  name  “Star  of  Bethlehem”.    The  species  C.  cyanea  is  

rare  and  endemic  to  around  Albany.    Of  course  many  of  the  

hundreds  of  orchids  are  blue  too.    Not  quite  blue  but  mauve  

Melaleuca  radula,  Graceful  Honey  Myrtle  surely  can  be  included  

too.    In  Kings  Park  gardens  I  met  the  brilliant  blue  daisy,  



Brachyscombe  iberidifolia,  popular  for  home  gardens,  called  Swan  

River  daisy.    So  many  and  varied  flowers  to  see  and  discover,  I  was  

a  bit  overwhelmed.      

Blue  colour  in  nature  is  not  common.    Less  than  10%of  the  

280.000  species  of  flowering  plants  are  blue.    The  pigments  in  

flowers  are  mostly  carotenoids  or  flavonoids.    Blue  colour  is  

shown  when  the  red  anthocyanin  pigment  has  been  modified  by  

the  plant  and  the  reflected  light  from  this  gives  us  blue.    

Anthocyanins  are  strong  antioxidants  and  plants  high  in  these  are  

recommended  for  healthy  eating.    Blue  in  flower  language  was  

used  to  convey  special  or  secret  messages  to  someone.    The  colour  

stands  for  desire  or  love.    It  symbolized  hope  and  beauty  or  peace  

and  tranquillity.    So  my  love  of  blue  helps  me  relax  and  slow  

down.    Peace  to  you  too!  

Photos  from  the  top:  Wild  Violet,  Hybanthus  calycinus;  a  blue  

Fringe  Myrtle,  Calytrix  sp.;  Graceful  Honey  Myrtle,  Melaleuca  



radula;  Blue  Lady  Orchid,  Thelymitra  crinite  and    Swan  River  

Daisy,  Brachyscome  iberidifolia  



 

 

 



Alice  Springs  Field  Naturalists  Club  

Page  10  

December  2016  ANN  

 

The  Abrolhos  Island  trip  

by  Deb  Clarke  and  Charlie  Carter  

(Pre  ANN  get-­‐together  tour)  

After  two  and  a  half  weeks  on  the  road  via  Kintore,  Kunawarritji,  Marble  Bar,  

Karijini,  Ningaloo,  Shark  Bay  and  Kalbarri  we  arrived  at  Geraldton  for  our  ANN  

Abrolhos  trip.  Along  the  way  we  experienced  the  most  stunning  wildflower  

display,  from  Glen  Helen  to  Marble  Bar  was  Ptilotus  Land,  including  Ptilotus  



rotundifolia  

(left)


 

 

At  Geraldton,  the  first  thing  we  found  was  that  most  things  are  shut  on  Sundays,  



but  the  ‘waterfront  precinct’  was  abuzz  with  people,  and  we  spent  a  few  hours  in  

the  Shipwreck  museum.  

 

The  most  famous  of  the  wrecks  is  the  Batavia,  run  aground  on  a  reef  in  the  



Abrolhos  in  1629  and  the  museum  has  lots  of  relics  and  information  about  it.    

 

We  boarded  our  boat  late  afternoon  spent  the  night  on  board,  and  headed  off  to  



the  islands  the  next  day.  Our  cabin  was  top  deck,  comfortable  and  en  suite.  

(left)


 

Our  skipper  and  owner,  Jay  had  been  a  cray  fisherman,  and  knows  the  islands,  the  

people  and  the  history.  The  crew  were  friendly  and  helpful  and  the  tucker  good    

and  plentiful.  Jay’s  laidback  style  almost  concealed  his  quiet  efficiency,  and  we  

covered  a  lot  of  ground  (and  sea)  over  the  4  days.    

 

Uninhabited  islands  in  the  Pelsaert  group  were  a  trove  of  birdlife,  and  we  had  a  



bird  expert  with  40  years  of  research  experience  for  the  first  day.  Landing  on  the  

islands  was  accomplished  in  glass-­‐bottom  boats  so  we  could  enjoy  the  corals  and  

fish  on  the  way.  

(left)  


 

Next  day  the  Easter  group  included  Rat  and  Little  Rat  islands  packed  with  cray  

fisherman’s  shacks.  

(left)


   Some  of  the  fisher  folk  can’t  stand  tourism,  but  one  of  

Jay’s  friends  gave  us  a  rundown  on  the  life  and  the  industry.  Jay  is  actively  trying  

to  get  the  two  groups  to  cooperate,  and  to  get  some  crayfish  available  for  visitors  

at  a  reasonable  price.  Currently  they  all  get  flown  to  Asia  @  $90  /  kilo.  

 

The  cooks  made  a  delicious  Pavlova  ‘birthday  cake’  for  Deb’s  birthday,  and  made  



it  a  nice  party.  

 

Sailing  on  to  the  Wallabi  group  we  saw  whales  and  dolphins  right  beside  the  boat  



(bottom  photos),

 and  on  Beacon  the  remains  of  the  Batavia  survivors  occupation  

and  the  gruesome  history.  

 

On  the  beaches  were  Sea  Lions,  very  quiet  and  up  close,  and  we  had  a  chance  to  



snorkel  over  the  coral  and  fish.  Masses  more  birds,  and  Tammar  Wallabies,  as  well  

as  various  reptiles  also  inhabit  these  islands.  The  islands  are  all  low-­‐lying,  and  

surrounded  by  reefs  giving  a  palette  of  beautiful  colours  in  the  water  and  on  the  

land.    

 

The  last  night  was  spent  back  at  the  wharf  in  Geraldton,  with  breakfast  on  shore  



the  next  morning.  We  picked  up  our  car,  and  set  off  for  Freo,  with  the  rest  of  the  

group  going  to  the  museum  and  then  the  bus  trip  south  to  the  ANN.  

     From  the  top:  Ptilotus  rotundifolius;  our  boat;  fish  and  coral;  cray  fishermens’  huts;  activity  near  Big  Rat  Island;  Dolphin  and  Whales.  


Alice  Springs  Field  Naturalists  Club  

Page  11  

December  2016  ANN  

 

 



 

 

Baby  Sea  Lion  



 

Batavia  plaque  

Abrolhos  Eremophila  

 

 



 

Daisies  among  the  coral  

 

Group  walking  on  the  beach  



Lesser  Noddy  on  nest  

 

 



 

Nesting  Cormorants  

 

Pacific  Gull  nest  



Pacific  Gull  

 

 



 

The  sky  full  of  birds  

 

Jocelyn  beside  a  fishermens’  marker  



Tammar  Wallaby  

 

 



 

Baby  Sea  Lion  suckling  

Storm  from  Big  Rat  Island  

 

Incredible  colours  of  the  water  and  land  



Alice  Springs  Field  Naturalists  Club  

Page  12  

December  2016  ANN  

 

Other  Odd  Thoughts  about  ANN  Perth  

by  Rosalie  Breen

 

First  I‘d  like  to  add  my  congratulations  to  the  steering  committee  and  their  many  helpers  for  a  well  



chosen  and  organized  gathering.    Our  excursions  were  to  a  broad  slice  of  the  country,  centred    

around  Perth.    Much  appreciated  was  the  comprehensive  booklet,  which  contained  as  well  as  our  

program  plant  and  bird  lists  for  the  different  places  we  visited,  with  a  brief  overview  of  each  

environment,  and  an  explanation  of  why  the  South  West  is  a  “biodiversity  hotspot”.        Our  cloth  bag  

had  a  wonderful  picture  of  a  numbat  designed  by  Mike  Bamford.            Thanks  to  all.  

Apart  from  blue  flowers  another  favourite  of  mine,  were  Feather  Flowers.    Their  genus  Verticordia    

means  “turner  of  hearts”.  It  is  well  deserving  of  its  name,  providing  a  stunning  display.  The  bushes  

were  thick  with  delicate  feathery  flower  petals  sure  to  impress  everyone  with  their  

glory.    Yellows  were  everywhere  in  the  heath  lands  of  Ellis  Brook  Valley.    There  are  also  

crimson  and  combinations  of  white  and  pinks.    These  after  pollination  change  to  red  

colours.    My  favourite  was  the  white  and  burgundy  Verticordia    huegelii,  Variegated  

feather  flower  

(left).

 Also  plantwise,  I  was  amazed  at  the  number  and  variety  of  Trigger  



Plants  and  the  carnivorous  plants,  Drosera  species  .  

Banksias  are  iconic  in  WA  because  

there  so  many  different  shapes,  sizes  

and  colours.    Most  produce  their  

flowers  and  cones  high  in  the  tree  or  

bush,  making  it  convenient  for  

pollination  by  birds  (and  possums)  seeking  nectar.    But  many  have  their  

flowers  at  ground  level.    Strange?    No!  These  are  pollinated  by  small  

marsupials,  such  as  bandicoots,  and  rodents.    But  a  worry  is  that  many  of  

these  smaller  animals  are  endangered.    Who  will  take  on  the  pollinator  job?    

 Radio  Hill  in  Fremantle,  an  easy  place  to  visit  and  with  expansive  views,  had  a  great  

display  of  many  different  species  of  orchids  in  a  self-­‐guided  Wildflower  Walk,  with  

many  signs  indicating  the  names  of  flowering  plants  too.    The  WA  floral  emblem,  the  

red  and  green  Kangaroo  Paw,  Anigozanthos  manglessii  was  present  in  its  vivid  velvet  

colours.  The  orange  Cats  Paw,  Anigozanthos  humilis  was  numerous  too,  since  it  

tends  to  appear  after  soil  disturbance,  or  fire  as  in  this  case.        

Every  nature  reserve  we  visited  seems  to  have  an  active  Friends  group  who  helped  

care  for  the  place.  These  provided  our  many  and  enthusiastic,  knowledgeable  guides.  

We  were  so  lucky  to  have  local  experts  so  willing  to  share  their  love  of  the  bush.    

Invasive  weeds  are  a  major  problem  for  the  volunteers.    Most  noticeable  weeds  

were  the  Pink  Gladiolus  and  the  (I  thought)  attractive  Blowfly  Grass.    Many  were  the  

same  as  appear  here  in  central  Australia.          

As  we  know  bird  beaks  are  adapted  to  the  food  they  need  to  collect.    A  major  food  source  for  cockatoos  and  parrots  in  the  

Southwest  is  the  Marri  tree,  a  bloodwood,  Corymbia  calophylla.    Interestingly,  Marri  is  from  the  Nyoongar  word  for  blood.    This  

and  Jarrah  and  Karri  are  the  well-­‐known  forest  trees.    The  birds  chew  the  big  nuts,  called  honkey  nuts,  to  obtain  the  seeds,  and  

can  be  identified  by  the  pattern  of  chew  marks  on  the  nuts,  dependent  on  the  shape  of  the  lower  jaw  of  their  beak  (mandible).    

Below:  Hirono  Kami,  our  guide  for  the  visit  to  Lightning  Swamp  showing  a  chart  of  chewed  Marri  nuts;  Nuts  chewed  by  the  

Forest  Red-­‐tailed  Black  Cockatoo.  



 

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə