Assessment Schedule – 2011 Art History: Explain why selected objects may be considered as art (91020)



Yüklə 42.68 Kb.
tarix14.04.2017
ölçüsü42.68 Kb.

NCEA Level 1 Art History (91020) 2011 — page of

Assessment Schedule – 2011

Art History: Explain why selected objects may be considered as art (91020)

Achievement Criteria

Achievement

Achievement with Merit

Achievement with Excellence


Explain is demonstrated through giving reasons why, or why not, the selected objects may be considered as art based on evidence from the objects.

Explain with clear reasons is demonstrated through giving well articulated reasons why, or why not, the selected objects may be considered as art based on evidence from the objects.

Explain with convincing reasons is demonstrated through giving persuasive reasons why, or why not, the selected objects may be considered as art based on evidence from the selected objects.

Evidence Statement

Question One

Achievement


The candidate has selected TWO objects made by artist(s) / creator(s) they have studied and explained why the chosen objects are considered as art.

Chosen objects are considered as art because:



Object 1: John Pule – Lithograph print

  • This art work shows the visual representation of a story that is taken from John Pule’s Niuean heritage.

  • He uses symbols that consist of living beings – humans, animals, vegetation and patterns to depict actual and spiritual journeys that are told within stories and fables.

  • The viewer is able to read the art work like a book and understand the story through reading the imagery, which is contained within a grid-like structure of geometrically-shaped divisions.

  • The art work is a Lithograph print. Materials used to make the art work are special lithographic pencils and plate, inks and paper.

  • Lithography is achieved by drawing an image onto a waxed or oily surfaced plate or stone and the ink is transferred onto the paper to make a print.

  • The art work has a drawn look to it as the edges of it are not geometrical and the images and grid look as though they are hand drawn as they are not symmetrical.

  • There is a lot of variation in the thickness of the lines as though they have been drawn on with a stick, pen or pencil.

  • Polynesian people would value this object as a work of art as it looks like a traditional tapa design done on bark cloth, which is considered a precious object in their society.

Object 2: Michael Parekowhai – Installation

This installation by Michael Parekowhai is an art work in the way it references our everyday life.

Because each of the ten guitars is displayed on a pedestal it changes the traditional function of the guitar.

Parekowhai wants to challenge the viewer’s thoughts about what an object should look like and represent. Therefore this object can be considered art because Parekowhai changes the context and meaning of the guitars.

Parekowhai uses a wide variety of materials and techniques in this installation – different kinds of wood and paua shell.

Each guitar would have required considerable time and skill to create. Each is mounted on a wooden pedestal and the ten guitars can be moved and arranged at the artist’s will.

The guitars are very realistic and detailed and were made by a professional guitar maker. The paua inlay was shaped into kowhaiwhai designs.

There was a lot of time and focus on giving the guitars a fine finish so they looked expensive and uniform. This also gave the guitars value as art works.

Even though the guitars were displayed on pedestals, they were also played as part of a performance on stages in art galleries that toured NZ.

Achievement with Merit


The candidate has selected TWO objects made by artist(s) / creator(s) they have studied and explained with clear reasons, why the chosen objects are considered as art.

Chosen objects are considered as art because:



Object 1: John Pule

This lithograph tells the story of the migration of Niuean people to other lands as was depicted on pieces of hand drawn bark cloth which dates back to the 1880s.

The cloth includes stories about the change in the nature of Polynesian society with the introduction of Christianity.

Lithography is a popular printmaking technique that involves a variety of materials – a plate or stone, wax or oily substance, inks and drawing tools such as pencils and brushes.

John Pule creates drawings of vaka, water, fish, birds, the moon and the stars in his composition as well as other symbols that represent ideas about migration.

The images’ hand-drawn quality makes them look like ‘cave drawings’.

Cave drawings were prized in early Polynesian society as they were the primary means of telling traditional stories and passing legends on down through the generations.

Object 2: Michael Parekowhai

Michael Parekowhai’s Ten Guitars makes us question what an art work is because we normally view the guitar as a musical instrument, not a piece of art.

He also explores the idea of merging culture with art. The guitars have been carved from wood, which is a traditional material for Maori, but the technique is used to create a European instrument, thus bringing the two cultures together. Therefore, we can accept Ten Guitars as a piece of art as all the guitars have been so finely carved from traditional woods.

The guitars were inspired by the song ‘Ten Guitars’. Even though this was first performed by a European singer, this song has been widely adopted by Maori. This too gives greater significance to the guitars as art forms.

In this way Parekowhai represents the ideal of harmony between NZ’S two cultures – Māori and Pākehā.

Achievement with Excellence


The candidate has selected TWO objects made by artist(s) / creator(s) they have studied and explained with convincing reasons why the chosen objects are considered as art.

Chosen objects are considered as art because:



Object 1: John Pule

Pule uses the lithograph to communicate ideas about his heritage and culture – translating words into images.

His prints explore a wide variety of legends and stories from Niuean mythology that reflects his own personal experience and wide reading.

The technique of lithography is popular as it has a fresh, drawn quality and it is a relatively quick process. Many prints can be taken off one lithographic stone.

In the late 1990s Pule taught lithography in Niue and Fiji, helping artists from other indigenous cultures extend their vision and depict their ideas creatively about their cultures.

Pule’s lithographs are unique in the way they can illustrate complex stories and ideas without words.

Many of his images are mythological creatures and demi-gods but many have personal significance to Pule’s family.

Migration also references genealogy, exploring Niuean culture and helping to preserve its traditional oral history.



Object 2: Michael Parekowhai

Ten Guitars is typical of Parekowhai’s work in the way he challenges viewers to examine what is art and also the boundaries of their comfort zone in what they should accept as art. Often Parekowhai would represent an everyday item in a different material, or alter its scale. Often the title he gave the art work was quirky or gave the art work a different context. Many of his art works like Ten Guitars are witty or use traditional Māori materials such as paua or kauri in an inventive or non-traditional way, to emphasise the purpose and value of the art work. For Ten Guitars he employed a craftsman to help him create the product of his idea. The technique, called using a ‘Third Person’, is something that many conceptual artists like Parekowhai do in the creation of their works.

Throughout his career, like in Ten Guitars, Parekowhai challenges preconceptions, combining Pākehā and Māori traditions, encouraging the viewer to examine and reconsider established traditions and ideas.


Question Two

Achievement


The candidate has selected TWO objects from the resource booklet and explained why the chosen objects are considered art.

Chosen objects are considered as art because:



Plate 1: Laurence Aberhart, Caravan, Cromwell, selenium toned photograph, 1977, 15.5 × 23.5 cm

This small photograph is an art work as it documents history of NZ through an iconic image of kiwi culture – the holiday home on wheels.

Aberhart travelled the country documenting things he saw on his trips, and this photograph was a part of this journey through Cromwell.

The artwork is a silver gelatine print and Aberhart used an old fashioned 100 year old large format view camera to create the image.

He took care with his technique of creating his art and the process for developing his prints was lengthy and could take up to 8 hours.

Caravan, Cromwell is a simple black and white photograph with a central composition of a caravan in front of a home. It is a documentation of an iconic scene in NZ history.

Caravan, Cromwell is a simple but powerful image.

Aberhart is an internationally acclaimed photographer and The Auckland Art Gallery owns this photographic art work as a part of their collection.



Plate 3: Chris Booth, Gateway, Auckland, basalt boulders, aluminium, stainless steel, water, 1986–1990, 18 × 5 m

Gateway is a welcoming arch into Albert Park, a public park in Auckland’s Central City.

It is a large scale public sculpture that is visible by many people at the end of a busy city centre street. It is a work of art as it is viewed and walked under by many people every day.

In order to create Gateway, Booth needed to make lots of detailed plans as the structure of this sculpture was an engineering feat.

Gigantic basalt boulders were collected and brought back to his studio so that the middle could be drilled out in order for the steel structure to be inserted. The boulders were then transported to the site.

This large Waharoa / gateway stands at the entrance to the park and is made of basalt boulders and aluminium and stainless steel. The boulders form two columns on either side of the gateway and the metals are used to form the arch for the gateway

The Gateway becomes a part of the background and the landscape with the trees growing up around it.

Chris Booth is a widely acclaimed sculptor who was commissioned to do Gateway because of his respect for nature and his use of organic materials.

He is a valued sculptor in New Zealand and studied under specialist sculptors for 2 years.

Achievement with Merit


The candidate has selected TWO objects from the resource booklet and explained with clear reasons, why the chosen objects are considered as art.

Chosen objects are considered as art because:



Plate 1: Laurence Aberhart, Caravan, Cromwell, selenium toned photograph, 1977, 15.5 × 23.5 cm

Aberhart often produces images steeped in history or culture and this image of a caravan in Cromwell documents iconic kiwi culture. It is a small photograph that captures the past and a moment in history. It is therefore an art work in the way that documentary photography is – it references NZ society and culture.

Aberhart is well known for his use of platinum prints but also used silver gelatine prints and he had an unusual photographic process. He often uses a large format camera to produce a small work.

Light plays an important part in his photographs and this one is no exception. The contrast of the white caravan with the dark sky and trees makes the caravan stand out and become the focal point. The highlighting of the image of the caravan, as well as the absence of people, becomes a comment on isolation.

Aberhart has been published in a major retrospective showcasing his work abroad in Europe, Asia, America and New Zealand.

Although he photographs numerous subjects, Aberhart is best known for his photography of buildings from around the world.



Plate 3: Chris Booth, Gateway, Auckland, basalt boulders, aluminium, stainless steel, water, 1986–1990, 18 × 5 m

In this large scale public Waharoa, Chris Booth demonstrates his love of nature; he has used organic materials in a monumental way that challenges the limits of the resources he uses.

Booth required substantial funding in order to make this phenomenal art work.

Chris Booth always seeks permission from people or departments to use his materials. He is respectful of the land and environment. In this instance Booth gained authorisation from the Conservation Department and Maori to locate suitable boulders.

Intricate planning was required, especially because it is a public sculpture and safety was an important concern. Therefore, the engineering process became more important than many of his other works. A support system was designed to enable the work to withstand an earthquake.

This is a site-specific artwork and the durability of the boulders means they have become an integral part of the park, as if they were always there.

Chris Booth is known for balancing stacked stones that have been taken from their original purpose, and this sculptural art work has become an important part of Auckland’s central city landscape.

Achievement with Excellence


The candidate has selected TWO objects from the resource booklet and explained with convincing reasons, why the chosen objects are considered as art.

Chosen objects are considered as art because:



Plate 1: Laurence Aberhart, Caravan, Cromwell, selenium toned photograph, 1977

This small black and white photograph of iconic imagery can seem familiar to the viewer and make one think they are looking at a photo album. However, the ordinary is made special through his process of using traditional and historical methods.

Aberhart uses an 8 × 10 inch Korona camera and has a great respect for artists, photographers and painters of the past, who have visually recorded our history.

Soon after purchasing his camera, the paper traditionally used was discontinued and therefore he adopted the selenium and silver gelatin print process.

There is a clarity of light that provides a layered and complexity of meaning of isolation and nostalgia.

The iconic and historical image of the caravan initiates a nostalgic relationship between the viewer and the image.

The images that Aberhart documents are a recording of visual history. However, his chosen medium also makes his images so special. His choice of using of an old-fashioned camera is also steeped in history.

Aberhart has exhibited extensively world wide since 1978 in group shows and even has exhibited solely.

His photographs are widely sought after and his most expensive photograph is Mount Taranaki, which ironically almost ended up in the rubbish.

Plate 3: Chris Booth, Gateway, Auckland, basalt boulders, aluminium, stainless steel, water, 1986–1990, 18 × 5 m

Chris Booth often challenges the limits of his resources as these boulders tower above and defy gravity.

Gateway offered its own challenges, as Chris Booth had to balance artistic intention with safety concerns.

In order to achieve the height he wanted he had to use lighter materials. He hollowed the aluminium forms so that he could continue to stack the boulders to where he wanted. If he hadn’t made this structural compromise he would have only been able to stack the boulders to half the height that he wanted.

This public sculpture becomes a Waharoa for the park, and also references the Māori culture and bicultural nature of the country. Waharoa are traditional entrances to villages or pas and they are known to protect villages. Chris Booth is recognising the spiritual connection between the land and the materials he uses. There is a further spiritual and important connection to the land as the boulders were gifted from the Ngati Kura people of Matauri Bay in Northland.

Location and the environment are important features of a Waharoa, and Gateway has both of these features – it is located centrally and is an integral part of the environment.


N1

N2

A3

A4

M5

M6

E7

E8


Information given does not address the question.

Information addressed question at a low level OR part of the question is not addressed.

Formal elements are described for both art works using some art terminology and evidence.

Description is clear.

Description is informed and detailed using art terminology and evidence

Description is well informed and detailed

Description of formal elements has depth. Terminology is purposeful for one or both works.

Description is thorough and terminology purposeful for both works.

N= No response; no relevant evidence.

Judgement Statement

Not Achieved

Achievement

Achievement
with Merit

Achievement
with Excellence
















Score range


0 – 2

3 – 4

5 – 6

7 – 8





Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə