1. Application details Permit application No



Yüklə 110,61 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü110,61 Kb.

Page 1  

  

 

Clearing Permit Decision Report  

 

1.  Application details  



 

1.1.  Permit application details 

Permit application No.: 

5426/1 


Permit type: 

Purpose Permit 



1.2.  Proponent details 

Proponent’s name: 

Saracen Gold Mines Pty Ltd 

1.3.  Property details 

Property: 

Mining Lease 28/269 



 

Mining Lease 31/220 



 

Mining Lease 31/295 



Local Government Area: 

Shire of Menzies and City of Kalgoorlie- Boulder 



Colloquial name: 

TSF  Expansion Project 



1.4.  Application 

Clearing Area (ha) 

No. Trees 

Method of Clearing 

For the purpose of: 

250 


 

Mechanical Removal 

Construction of a Tailings Storage Facility and 

associated activities 



1.5.  Decision on application 

Decision on Permit Application: 

Grant 


Decision Date: 

14 February 2013 



2.  Site Information 

2.1.  Existing environment and information 

2.1.1. Description of the native vegetation under application 

 

Vegetation Description

 

Beard vegetation associations have been mapped for the whole of Western Australia.  Two Beard vegetation 



associations have been mapped within the application area (GIS Database): 

 

Beard vegetation association 20: Low woodland; mulga mixed with Allocasuarina cristata & Eucalyptus sp; and  

 

Beard vegetation association 24:  Low woodland; Allocasuarina cristata (Government of Western Australia, 

2011; GIS Database). 

 

A flora and vegetation survey conducted by Holm (2012) during 17 to 21 November 2012 identified six distinct 



vegetation communities within the application area:  

 

2a: Low lateritic rises – Very sparse woodland (to 10 metres) of Casuarina obesa with very sparse mid-height 

shrub  layers  dominated  by  Eremophila  scoparia,  Scaevola  spinescens,  Senna  artemisioides  subsp.  filifolia  and 



Acacia colletioides

 

2b: Low rises on basaltic or metamorphic rocks – Very sparse to mid-dense mixed height degraded chenopod 

shrublands  dominated  by  Dodonaea  lobulata,  Senna  artemisioides  subsp.  filifolia,  Acacia  burkittii,  Ptilotus 

obovatus  with  isolated  to  very  sparse  tree  layer  (6  to  15  meter)  of  Casuarina  obesa  and  occasionally  A. 

incurvaneura, Grevillea nematophylla subsp. nematophylla and/or Alextryon oleifolius. Less frequently shrublands 

dominated by Maireana sedifolia

 

2c:  Sandy  rises  –  Sparse  woodlands  dominated  by  Acacia  incurvaneura  and  low  mallees  including  Eucalyptus 

eremicola,  E.  ceratocorys  and  E.  oldfieldii  over  a  diverse  sparse  Shrubland  with  spinifex  (Triodia  irritans)  often 

dominated  by  myrtaceous  shrubs.  Shrubs  include  Eremophila  forrestii  subsp.  forrestii,  Thryptomene  kochii, 



Verticordia pritzelii, Prostanthera althoferi subsp. althoferi and Acacia effusifolia

 

4a:  Plains  supporting  eucalypt  or  acacia  shrublands  –  Very  sparse  tall  Acacia  shrublands  (4  to  6  metres) 

dominated by Acacia incurvaneura, A. aptaneura or sparse mid height Acacia shrublands dominated by A. burkittii 

with  overstoreys  of  isolated  Casuarina  obesa  or  Eucalyptus  oleosa  subsp.  oleosa  and  lower  shrubs  including 



Dodonaea lobulata, Senna artemisioides subsp. filifolia and Ptilotus obovatus

 

4b: Sand plains supporting sparse eucalypt woodlands – Very sparse eucalypt woodland (6 to 10 metres) of 



Eucalyptus  flocktoniae  subsp.  flocktoniae,  E.  yilgarnensis  and  E.  oleosa  subsp.  oleosa  over  mixed  height,  very 

sparse  shrubs  including  Eremophila  caperata,  Acacia  colletioides  and  Westringia  rigida  and  mid-dense  Triodia 



irritans; and 

 

5:  Alluvial  plains  supporting  chenopod  shrublands  –  Very  sparse  to  sparse  mixed  height  chenopod 

shrublands dominated by Maireana sedifolia, M. georgei, M. pyramidata, Atriplex vesicaria, Ptilotus obovatus and 

others  or  in  poor  condition  dominated  by  Senna  artemisioides  subsp.  filifolia,  Eremophila  scorparia,  Dodonaea 



Page 2  

lobulata  and  Acacia  burkittii  overtopped  with  isolated  and  clumped  tree  layer  of  Casuarina  obesa,  Eucalyptus 

brachycorys and E. lesouefii

 

Clearing Description

 

Saracen Gold Mines is proposing to clear up to 250 hectares of native vegetation within an application area of 681 



hectares for the construction of a Tailings Storage Facility (TSF). This includes associated pipe work, monitoring 

bores and other infrastructure and rehabilitation of the existing TSF batters. 

 

The vegetation will be cleared using a bull dozer and grader or scrapers. The vegetation and topsoil will be 



stockpiled separately for use in rehabilitation. 

 

Vegetation Condition

 

Very Good: Vegetation structure altered; obvious signs of disturbance (Keighery, 1994); 



 

To: 


 

Completely Degraded: No longer intact; completely/almost completely without native species (Keighery, 1994). 

 

Comment

 

The application area is located in the East Murchison subregion of Western Australia and is situated approximately 



105 kilometres north-east of the Kalgoorlie town site (GIS Database). 

 

The vegetation condition was derived from a vegetation survey conducted by Holm (2012).



 

3.  Assessment of application against clearing principles 

(a)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises a high level of biological diversity. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

The application area occurs within the East Murchison subregion of the Murchison Interim Biogeographic 

Regionalisation of Australia (IBRA) bioregion (GIS Database). This subregion is characterised by internal 

drainage and extensive areas of elevated red desert sandplains with minimal dune development. Vegetation is 

dominated by Mulga Woodlands which is often rich in ephemerals; hummock grasslands, saltbush shrublands 

and Halosarcia shrublands (CALM, 2002). 

 

Holm (2012) conducted a flora and vegetation survey over the application area during 17 to 21 November 



2012. The flora and vegetation survey identified six vegetation communities within the application area. The 

area proposed to be cleared is not considered to be remnant vegetation and has been disturbed by recent 

mining activity, has been grazed, and vehicle and pastoral fences cross the area. The condition of the 

vegetation types are classified as 'completely degraded' to 'very good' (Keighery, 1994; Holm, 2012). The flora 

survey identified a total of 136 vascular plant taxa from 25 families within the application area. Species 

composition and vegetation communities are typical of the area and not considered to be unusually diverse 

(Holm, 2012). The collection of Daviesia benthamii subsp. acanthoclonaEucalyptus flocktoniae subsp. 

flocktoniaeE. oleosa subsp. cylindroideaMarianthus bicolourSpartothamnella subsp. Helena & Aurora 

Range and Thryptomene kochii recorded within the application area represent significant extension of their 

known distribution range (Holm, 2012).  

 

A search of the Department of Environment and Conservation’s Threatened and Priority Flora databases 



revealed one record of Priority Flora species within a 20 kilometre radius of the application area (DEC, 2013). 

No Threatened Flora species were identified (DEC, 2013). Holm (2012) identified no Threatened Flora and two 

Priority Flora species within the application area. A single plant of Spartothamnella sp. Helena & Aurora Range 

(Priority 3) species and a single population of at least 100 plants of Eremophila arachnoids subsp. tenera 

(Priority 1) species, were located during the survey within vegetation type 5. Saracen (2012) state that 

infrastructure has been designed to avoid the area in which the two priority species are located. The known 

locations of the two priority species will not be disturbed. Potential impacts to this Priority Flora species may be 

minimised through the implementation of a flora management condition. 

No Threatened Ecological Communities or Priority Ecological Communities were recorded within the 

application area (GIS Database). 

 

There was no weed species identified during the survey (Holm, 2012). Weeds have the potential to significantly 



change the dynamics of a natural ecosystem and lower the biodiversity of an area. Potential impacts to the 

biodiversity as a result of the proposed clearing may be minimised by the implementation of a weed 

management condition. 

 

There were six fauna habitat types recorded within the application area based on vegetation structure and 



types identified by Holm (2012). All faunal habitats within the application area are considered to be common 

and widespread within the subregion and faunal assemblages are unlikely to be different to those found in 

similar habitat located elsewhere in the region (GIS Database). The clearing of 250 hectares of native 

vegetation within the 681 hectare application area is unlikely to have a significant impact on faunal diversity in a 

regional and local context. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

CALM (2002) 

DEC (2013) 

Holm (2012) 

Keighery (1994) 

GIS Database: 



Page 3  

- IBRA WA (Regions - Subregions) 

- Pre-European vegetation 

- Threatened Ecological Sites Buffered 

 

(b)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises the whole or a part of, or is necessary for the 

maintenance of, a significant habitat for fauna indigenous to Western Australia. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

There were six fauna habitat types recorded within the application area based on vegetation structure and 

types identified by Holm (2012). 

 

There was no fauna survey conducted over the application area. A fauna survey over a large area which 



includes the application area conducted by Metcalf & Bamford (2002) and Coffey Environments (2010) 

concluded that the vertebrate fauna of the application area is likely to be typical of a broad area of the Eastern 

Goldfields, that is, moderately rich in reptiles and birds. Metcalf & Bamford (2002) and Coffey Environments 

(2010) did not identify any significant faunal assemblages within the survey area. Coffey Environments (2010) 

and Metcalf & Bamford (2002) identified the vegetation condition to be 'completely degraded' to 'very good' 

(Keighery, 1994). 

 

There are is one species of conservation significance listed as either threatened species under the 



Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act (EPBC) 1999 or protected under Western Australian 

legislation (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950), which may potentially occur within a 20 kilometre radius of the 

application areas; the Malleefowl (Leipoa ocellata) (DEC, 2013). 

 

Holm (2012) conducted a targeted Malleefowl search as part of the flora survey in November 2012. The survey 



identified three active and three moribund nests within the application area, tracks were observed and two birds 

were sighted. There was no clear habitat preference for the Malleefowls, although Malleefowl appeared to 

avoid areas with dense spinifex (Holm, 2012). The proposed clearing will not impact on the active Malleefowl 

nests (Saracen, 2013). One of the active nests is near the TSF footprint, and Saracen (2013) will maintain a 50 

metre buffer around the nest during clearing and construction of topsoil stockpiles. Saracen (2013) will have a 

100 meter buffer around the two known nests and any other active nests found. Potential impacts to 

conservation significant fauna as a result of the proposed clearing may be minimised by the implementation of 

a fauna management condition. 

 

The proposed clearing of 250 hectares of native vegetation is not likely to impact critical feeding or breeding 



habitat for the Malleefowl as they are considered highly mobile and have a wide distribution. The clearing is 

unlikely to significantly impact on this species.  

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Coffey Environments (2010) 

DEC (2013) 

Holm (2012) 

Keighery (1994) 

Metcalf & Bamford (2002) 

Saracen (2013) 

 

(c)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it includes, or is necessary for the continued existence of, 



rare flora. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

According to available databases, there are no records of Threatened Flora within the application area (GIS 

Database). A search of the Department of Environment and Conservation's Threatened and Priority Flora 

databases identified no Threatened Flora species as occurring within a 20 kilometre radius of the application 

area (DEC, 2013). 

 

Holm (2012) conducted a flora and vegetation survey of the application area between 17 and 21 November. No 



Threatened Flora was recorded within the survey area. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

DEC (2013) 

Holm (2012) 

GIS Database: 

- Threatened and Priority Flora List 

 

(d)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it comprises the whole or a part of, or is necessary for the 



maintenance of a threatened ecological community. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

A search of the available databases showed that there are no known Threatened Ecological Communities 



Page 4  

situated within 30 kilometres of the application area (GIS Database). 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

GIS Database: 

- Threatened Ecological Sites Buffered 

 

(e)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it is significant as a remnant of native vegetation in an area 



that has been extensively cleared. 

Comments 

Proposal is not at variance to this Principle

 

 

The application area falls within the Murchison IBRA bioregion (GIS Database). The vegetation within the 

application area is recorded as: 

 

Beard vegetation association 20: Low woodland; mulga mixed with Allocasuarina cristata &  Eucalyptus sp; 

and  

 

Beard vegetation association 24:  Low woodland; Allocasuarina cristata (Government of Western Australia, 



2011; GIS Database). 

 

Beard vegetation associations 20 and 24 retain approximately 99% of their pre-European extent within the 



bioregion (Government of Western Australia, 2011). The area proposed to be cleared is not a significant 

remnant of native vegetation. 

 

 

* Government of Western Australia (2011) 



** Department of Natural Resources and Environment (2002) 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not at variance to this Principle. 

 

 

Pre-European 



area (ha)* 

Current extent 

(ha)* 

Remaining 



%* 

Conservation 

Status** 

Pre-European 

% in IUCN 

Class I-IV 

Reserves 

IBRA Bioregion 

- Murchison 

28,120,587 

28,044,823 

~99.73 


Least 

Concern 


1.05 

Beard vegetation associations 

- State 

20 


1,295,103 

1,292,474 

~99.80 

Least 


Concern 

13.32 


24 

263,148 


263,129 

~99.99 


Least 

Concern 


Beard vegetation associations 

- Bioregion 

20 


1,174,259 

1,171,631 

~99.78 

Least 


Concern 

8.89 


24 

22,163 


22,144 

~99.91 


Least 

Concern 




Methodology 

Department of Natural Resources and Environment (2002) 

Government of Western Australia (2011) 

GIS Database: 

- IBRA WA (regions - subregions) 

- Pre-European Vegetation 

 

(f)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if it is growing in, or in association with, an environment 

associated with a watercourse or wetland. 

Comments 

Proposal is at variance to this Principle

 

 

Based on the vegetation mapping by Holm (2012), the vegetation types '4a: Plains supporting eucalypt or 

acacia shrublands' and '5: Alluvial plains supporting chenopod shrublands' are associated with drainage lines. 

The condition of the vegetation type is classified as 'very good' to 'degraded' (Keighery, 1994; GIS Database).  

 

There are no permanent watercourses or waterbodies within the application area. Surface drainage in the 



application area is through several ephemeral drainage lines (GIS Database), which flow during periods of 

intense rainfall north-easterly from the south and west via overland flow to off-site drainage tracts which flow 

into Lake Rebecca, 7 kilometres to the north-east (Holm, 2012). The vegetation type associated with the 

drainage lines is considered to be common and widespread within the subregion (Holm, 2012; GIS Database). 

Clearing of areas which contain riparian vegetation have the potential to cause localised erosion to the creek 

habitat and increase sediment discharge to drainage tracts down-slope, and ultimately to Lake Rebecca (Holm, 

2012). Provided disturbance to riparian habitats is avoided or minimised where possible, and strict weed 


Page 5  

hygiene procedures are followed, the proposed works are not expected to substantially impact any 

watercourses or wetlands. Potential impacts to riparian vegetation may be minimised through the 

implementation of a vegetation management condition. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Holm (2012) 

Keighery (1994) 

GIS Database: 

- Geodata, Lakes 

- Hydrography, Linear 

- Mulgabbie 1.4 Orthomosaic ? Landgate 2003 

 

(g)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to cause appreciable 



land degradation. 

Comments 

Proposal may be at variance to this Principle

 

 

The application area intersects the Deadman, Moriarty and Kirgella land systems (GIS Database). 

 

 

The Deadman land system is described as calcareous plains adjacent to salt lake systems, supporting acacia 



shrublands with black oak overstoreys. This land system is generally not susceptible to soil erosion (Pringle et 

al., 1994). 

 

The Moriarty land system is described as low greenstone rises and stony plains supporting halophytic and 



acacia shrublands with patchy eucalypt overstoreys. Slopes of low rises without protective stone mantles, 

alluvial plains and narrow drainage tracts are moderately susceptible to water erosion, particularly if perennial 

shrub cover is substantially reduced or the soil surface is disturbed. The vegetation of this land system is highly 

preferred for grazing by introduced and native animals rendering it susceptible to overgrazing and consequent 

degradation (Pringle et al., 1994). 

 

The Kirgella land system is described as extensive sandplain, with scattered granite outcrop and fringing 



drainage foci and very sparse drainage tracts, supporting mainly spinifex hummock grasslands and mulga and 

mallee shrublands (Pringle et al., 1994). Pringle et al. (1994) did not identify soil erosion as a land management 

issue in the Kirgella land system. Holm (2012) identifies that the Kirgella land system has a low susceptibly to 

soil erosion. 

 

The above land systems generally have a low erosion hazard, however, due to the tenements mining history 



and cattle grazing, the vegetation of the application area has been previously disturbed (Saracen, 2012). Due to 

the large area of native vegetation proposed to be cleared (250 hectares) potential land degradation impacts as 

a result of the proposed clearing may be minimised by the implementation of a staged clearing condition. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing may be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Holm (2012) 

Pringle et al. (1994) 

Saracen (2012) 

GIS Database:  

- Rangeland Land System Mapping 

 

(h)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to have an impact on 

the environmental values of any adjacent or nearby conservation area. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

The application area is not located within any conservation area (GIS Database). The nearest conservation 

area is Goongarrie National Park, located approximately 59 kilometres west of the application area (GIS 

Database). 

 

Given the distance of the application area from Goongarrie National Park, the proposed clearing is not likely to 



provide a significant ecological linkage or fauna movement corridor and is not likely to impact the environmental 

values of the conservation area. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

GIS Database: 

- DEC Tenure 

 


Page 6  

(i)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if the clearing of the vegetation is likely to cause deterioration 

in the quality of surface or underground water. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

The application area is not located within a Public Drinking Water Source Area (GIS Database). The application 

areas are located within the proclaimed Goldfields groundwater area under the Rights in Water and Irrigation 

Act 1914 (GIS Database). Any groundwater extraction and/or taking or diversion of surface water for the 

purposes other than domestic and/or stock watering is subject to licence by the Department of Water.  

 

There are no permanent watercourses or water bodies within the application area (GIS Database). Several 



ephemeral drainage tracts transect the application area (GIS Database). These drainage tracts are dry for most 

of the year and only flow and hold surface water for short durations following significant rainfall events, where 

turbid water from intense rainfall events will flow to Lake Rebecca which is nearby the application area 

(Saracen, 2012; GIS Database).  

 

Surface water (as sheet flow) flows east from breakaways and hills of underlying bedrock to the west to a broad 



drainage line east of the application area (Aquaterra, 2010). Surface water flow in the local area has been 

significantly modified by existing mining infrastructure. The Whirling Dervish Stage 1/2 waste rock dump and 

TSF block water flow from the west; this water is diverted around the Whirling Dervish waste dump and TSF via 

an existing drainage channel (Aquaterra, 2010; Saracen, 2012). The Western By-pass road design has been 

modified to minimise impact on vegetation type 5 which is associated with drainage lines and associated 

surface water flows (Saracen, 2012). The diversion drain to be constructed along the western margin of the By-

pass road will divert water north to the drainage line north of the road into the vegetation type 5, and the drain 

will terminate in a spreading device made of course competent rock to slow and spread any water flow to 

minimise erosion and sediment loading in surface water (Saracen, 2012). 

 

The application has a groundwater salinity that ranges from saline to hypersaline (6,930 - 120,000 



milligrams/Litre Total Dissolved Solids (TDS)) (Saracen, 2012; GIS Database).  The clearing of vegetation as a 

result of this proposal is therefore unlikely to result in any further deterioration in surface or groundwater quality 

in the local area. 

 

There are no known groundwater dependent ecosystems within the application area (GIS Database). It is 



unlikely that Stygofauna are present within the application area as the ground water salinities range up to 

120,000 milligrams/Litre TDS and there is no calcrete below the water table in the area which is not suitable 

habitat conditions for Stygofauna (Saracen, 2012). 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

Aquaterra (2010) 

Saracen (2012) 

GIS Database: 

- Geodata, Lakes 

- Groundwater Salinity, Statewide 

- Hydrography, Linear 

- Public Drinking Water Source Areas 

- RIWI Act, Groundwater Areas 

 

(j)  Native vegetation should not be cleared if clearing the vegetation is likely to cause, or exacerbate, the 



incidence or intensity of flooding. 

Comments 

Proposal is not likely to be at variance to this Principle

 

 

The application area experiences an arid climate, with mainly winter rainfall of an annual average rainfall of 

approximately 264.9 millimetres per year (CALM, 2002; BoM, 2013). Based on an average annual evaporation 

rate of 2,400 - 2,800 millimetres (BoM, 2013), any surface water resulting from rainfall events is likely to be 

relatively short lived. 

 

Given the size of the area to be cleared (250 hectares) compared to the size of the Raeside-Ponton catchment 



area (11,589,532 hectares) (GIS Database) it is not likely that the proposed clearing will lead to an appreciable 

increase in run off, and subsequently cause or exacerbate the incidence or intensity of flooding. 

 

Based on the above, the proposed clearing is not likely to be at variance to this Principle. 



 

Methodology 

BoM (2013) 

CALM (2002) 

 

GIS Database: 



- Hydrographic Catchments - Catchments 

 


Page 7  

Planning instrument, Native Title, Previous EPA decision or other matter. 

Comments 

 

 

There are no Native Title claims over the area under application. However, the mining tenure has been granted 

in accordance with the future act regime of the Native Title Act 1993 and the nature of the act (i.e. the proposed 

clearing activity) has been provided for in that process, therefore the granting of a clearing permit is not a future 

act under the Native Title Act 1993

 

There are no registered Aboriginal Sites of Significance within the application area (GIS Database). It is the 



proponent's responsibility to comply with the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972 and ensure that no Aboriginal Sites of 

Significance are damaged through the clearing process. 

 

It is the proponent's responsibility to liaise with the Department of Environment and Conservation and the 



Department of Water, to determine whether a Works Approval, Water Licence, Bed and Banks Permit, or any 

other licences or approvals are required for the proposed works. 

 

The clearing permit application was advertised on 14 January 2013 by the Department of Mines and Petroleum 



inviting submissions from the public. One submission was received stating no objection to the proposal. 

 

 

Methodology 

GIS Database: 

- Aboriginal Sites of Significance 

- Native Title Claims - Determined by the Federal Court 

- Native Title Claims - Registered with the NNTT 



4.  References 

Aquaterra (2010) Carosue Dam Surface Water Management Upstream Catchment Plan; Memo prepared for Saracen Gold 

Mines, June 2010. 

BoM (2013) Climate Statistics for Australian Locations. A Search for Climate Statistics for Kalgoorlie-Boulder, Australian 

Government Bureau of Meteorology, viewed 17 January 2013, 

CALM (2002) A Biodiversity Audit of Western Australia's 53 Biogeographical Subregions. Murchison 1 (MUR1 - East 

Murchison subregion) Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia. 

Coffey Environments (2010) Level 1 Vertebrate fauna survey for the Carosue Dam project, Saracen Gold. Report prepared for 

Saracen Gold Mines Pty Ltd. Appended. 

DEC (2013) NatureMap - Mapping Western Australia Biodiversity, Department of Environment and Conservation, viewed 17 

January 2013, 

Department of Natural Resources and Environment (2002) Biodiversity Action Planning. Action planning for native biodiversity 

at multiple scales; catchment bioregional, landscape, local. Department of Natural Resources and Environment, 

Victoria. 

Government of Western Australia (2011); 2011 Statewide Vegetation Statistics incorporating the CAR Reserve Analysis (Full 

Report). WA Department of Environment and Conservation, Perth. 

Holm, A & Associates (Holm) (2012) Environmental Assessment: Tailings Storage Facility Expansion. Report prepared for 

Saracen Gold Mine, December 2012. 

Keighery, B.J. (1994) Bushland Plant Survey: A Guide to Plant Community Survey for the Community. Wildflower Society of 

WA (Inc). Nedlands, Western Australia.  

Metcalf, B & Bamford, M (2002) Vertebrate fauna of the proposed Carosue Dam - Safari haul road. Report for Sons of Gwalia 

Ltd, Perth, Western Australia. 

Pringle, H.J.R, Van Vreeswyk, A.M.E. and Gilligan, S.A. (1994) An inventory and condition survey of rangelands in the north-

eastern Goldfields, Western Australia, Technical Bulletin No. 87., Department of Agriculture, South Perth, Western 

Australia. 

Saracen Gold Mines Pty Ltd (Saracen) (2012) Tailings Storage Facility Cell 3 - Clearing Permit Application, Supporting 

Information. Internal report, December 2012. 

Saracen Gold Mines Pty Ltd (Saracen) (2013) Additional Information to Assessing Officer Regarding CPS 5426/1 (E-mail). 

January, 2013.  

 

5.  Glossary 

 

  Acronyms: 

 

BoM

 

Bureau of Meteorology, Australian Government



 

CALM

 

Department of Conservation and Land Management (now DEC), Western Australia



 

DAFWA

 

Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia



 

DEC 

Department of Environment and Conservation, Western Australia 



DEH 

Department of Environment and Heritage (federal based in Canberra) previously Environment Australia 



DEP

 

Department of Environment Protection (now DEC), Western Australia



 

DIA 

Department of Indigenous Affairs 



DLI

 

Department of Land Information, Western Australia 



DMP 

Department of Mines and Petroleum, Western Australia 



DoE

 

Department of Environment (now DEC), Western Australia



 

Page 8  

DoIR

 

Department of Industry and Resources (now DMP), Western Australia



 

DOLA

 

Department of Land Administration, Western Australia



 

DoW 

Department of Water 



EP Act

 

Environmental Protection Act 1986, Western Australia



 

EPBC Act 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Federal Act) 



GIS

 

Geographical Information System 



ha 

Hectare (10,000 square metres) 



IBRA

 

Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia



 

IUCN 

International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources – commonly known as the World 

Conservation Union 

RIWI Act

 

Rights in Water and Irrigation Act 1914, Western Australia



 

s.17 

Section 17 of the Environment Protection Act 1986, Western Australia 



TEC

 

Threatened Ecological Community



 

 

   



Definitions: 

 

{Atkins, K (2005). Declared rare and priority flora list for Western Australia, 22 February 2005. Department of Conservation and 

Land Management, Como, Western Australia} :-

 

 



P1 

Priority  One  -  Poorly  Known  taxa:  taxa  which  are  known  from  one  or  a  few  (generally  <5)  populations 

which are under threat, either due to small population size, or being on lands under immediate threat, e.g. 

road  verges,  urban  areas,  farmland,  active  mineral  leases,  etc.,  or  the  plants  are  under  threat,  e.g.  from 

disease,  grazing  by  feral  animals,  etc.  May  include  taxa  with  threatened  populations  on  protected  lands. 

Such taxa are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in urgent need of further survey. 

 

P2 

Priority Two - Poorly Known taxa: taxa which are known from one or a few (generally <5) populations, at 

least some of which are not believed to be under immediate threat (i.e. not currently endangered). Such taxa 

are under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in urgent need of further survey. 

 

P3 

Priority Three - Poorly Known taxa: taxa which are known from several populations, at least some of which 

are  not  believed  to  be  under  immediate  threat  (i.e.  not  currently  endangered).  Such  taxa  are  under 

consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in need of further survey. 

 

P4 

Priority Four – Rare taxa: taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed and which, whilst 

being  rare  (in  Australia),  are  not  currently  threatened  by  any  identifiable  factors.  These  taxa  require 

monitoring every 5–10 years. 

 



Declared Rare Flora – Extant taxa (= Threatened Flora = Endangered + Vulnerable): taxa which have been 

adequately searched for, and are deemed to be in the wild either rare, in danger of extinction, or otherwise in 

need  of  special  protection,  and  have  been  gazetted  as  such,  following  approval  by  the  Minister  for  the 

Environment, after recommendation by the State’s Endangered Flora Consultative Committee. 



 



Declared Rare Flora - Presumed Extinct taxa: taxa which have not been collected, or otherwise verified, 

over  the  past  50  years  despite  thorough  searching,  or  of  which  all  known  wild  populations  have  been 

destroyed  more  recently,  and  have  been  gazetted  as  such,  following  approval  by  the  Minister  for  the 

Environment, after recommendation by the State’s Endangered Flora Consultative Committee.  



 

          

 

{Wildlife Conservation (Specially Protected Fauna) Notice 2005} [Wildlife Conservation Act 1950] :- 

 

Schedule 1 



 

Schedule 1 – Fauna that is rare or likely to become extinct: being fauna that is rare or likely to become 

extinct, are declared to be fauna that is need of special protection. 



 

Schedule 2      Schedule  2  –  Fauna  that  is  presumed  to  be  extinct:  being  fauna  that  is  presumed  to  be  extinct,  are 

declared to be fauna that is need of special protection. 



 

Schedule 3   

 

Schedule  3  –  Birds  protected  under  an  international  agreement:  being  birds  that  are  subject  to  an 

agreement between the governments of Australia and Japan relating to the protection of migratory birds and 

birds in danger of extinction, are declared to be fauna that is need of special protection. 

 

 

 

Schedule 4   

 

Schedule 4 – Other specially protected fauna: being fauna that is declared to be fauna that is in need of 

special protection, otherwise than for the reasons mentioned in Schedules 1, 2 or 3. 



 

 

{CALM (2005). Priority Codes for Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Como, Western Australia} :-

 

 

P1 

Priority  One:  Taxa  with  few,  poorly  known  populations  on  threatened  lands:  Taxa  which  are  known 

from few specimens or sight records from one or a few localities on lands not managed for conservation, e.g. 

agricultural  or  pastoral  lands,  urban  areas,  active  mineral  leases.    The  taxon  needs  urgent  survey  and 

evaluation of conservation status before consideration can be given to declaration as threatened fauna. 



 

P2 

Priority Two: Taxa with few, poorly known populations on conservation lands: Taxa which are known 

from  few  specimens  or  sight  records  from  one  or  a  few  localities  on  lands  not  under  immediate  threat  of 

habitat  destruction  or  degradation,  e.g.  national  parks,  conservation  parks,  nature  reserves,  State  forest, 

vacant  Crown  land,  water  reserves,  etc.    The  taxon  needs  urgent  survey  and  evaluation  of  conservation 

status before consideration can be given to declaration as threatened fauna. 

 

P3 

Priority Three: Taxa with several, poorly known populations, some on conservation lands: Taxa which 

are known from few specimens or sight records from several localities, some of which are on lands not under 

immediate  threat  of  habitat  destruction  or  degradation.    The  taxon  needs  urgent  survey  and  evaluation  of 

conservation status before consideration can be given to declaration as threatened fauna. 



 

Page 9  

P4 

Priority Four: Taxa in need of monitoring: Taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed, 

or for which sufficient knowledge is available, and which are considered not currently threatened or in need 

of special protection, but could be if present circumstances change.  These taxa are usually represented on 

conservation lands. 



 

P5 

Priority Five: Taxa in need of monitoring: Taxa which are not considered threatened but are subject to a 

specific conservation program, the cessation of which would result in the species becoming threatened within 

five years. 

 

 

Categories of threatened species (Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)  



EX 

Extinct:  A native species for which there is no reasonable doubt that the last member of the species has 

died. 


 

EX(W) 

Extinct in the wild:  A native species which: 

(a)  is  known  only  to  survive  in  cultivation,  in  captivity  or  as  a  naturalised  population  well  outside  its  past 

range;  or  

(b)  has  not  been  recorded  in  its  known  and/or  expected  habitat,  at  appropriate  seasons,  anywhere  in  its 

past range,  despite exhaustive surveys over a time frame appropriate to its life cycle and form. 

 

CR 

Critically Endangered:  A native species which is facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild in 

the immediate future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria. 



 

EN 

Endangered:  A native species which:   

(a)  is not critically endangered;  and 

(b)  is facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild in the near future, as determined in accordance with the 

prescribed criteria. 

 

VU 

Vulnerable:  A native species which: 

(a)  is not critically endangered or endangered;  and 

(b)  is facing a high risk of extinction in the wild in the medium-term future, as determined in accordance with 

the prescribed criteria. 

 

CD 

Conservation  Dependent:    A  native  species  which  is  the  focus  of  a  specific  conservation  program,  the 

cessation  of  which  would  result  in  the  species  becoming  vulnerable,  endangered  or  critically  endangered 

within a period of 5 years. 

 

 



 


Yüklə 110,61 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə