Guide to Evolution of Insult Laws



Yüklə 4,8 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/16
tarix07.03.2017
ölçüsü4,8 Kb.
növüGuide
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16

 
INSULT LAWS: 
INSULTING 
TO PRESS FREEDOM 
 
 
A Guide to Evolution of Insult Laws 
in 2010 
 
 
by Patti McCracken 
introduction by Raymond Louw 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
a publication of 
World Press Freedom Committee 
and Freedom House 
funded by Ringier AG 
 
 

 
 
Funding of this publication, by Ringier AG, Zurich, Switzerland 
Country maps by permission of The Heritage Foundation, Washington, D.C. 
 
Press freedom ratings by Freedom House 
 
Editor of the publication: Ronald Koven 
 
Other WPFC publications on this subject include: 
 
 
 
 “Insult Laws: An Insult to Press Freedom,  
 
      Study of More Than 90 Countries and Territories”   
 
 
         by Ruth Walden, 286 pages, 2000 
 
“Hiding From the People, How ‘insult’ laws restrict public scrutiny  
    of public officials, What can be done about it,”  18 pages, 2000 
 
“It’s a Crime: How Insult Laws Stifle Press Freedom, 2006 Status Report  
 
 
edited by Marilyn Greene, 306 pages, 2007 
 
“The Right to Offend, Shock or Disturb, A Guide to Evolution of Insult Laws  
 
       in 2007-2008,” by Carolyn R. Wendell, 156 pages, 2009 
 
“Insult Laws: In Contempt of Justice, A Guide to Evolution of Insult Laws  
in 2009,” by Uta Melzer, 220 pages, 2010 
 
Those publications and copies of this book may be obtained by contacting: 
 
 
 
Freedom House 
 
 
 
1301 Connecticut Ave. NW, 6
th
 floor 
 
 
 
Washington, D.C. 20036, USA 
 
 
     or  World Press Freedom Committee 
 
 
 
133, avenue de Suffren 
 
 
 
75007 Paris, France 
 
 
  
 
Published by the World Press Freedom Committee and Freedom House   
 
 
 
 
 
  © 2012 
 

 
Table of Contents 
 
Biographical Notes 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Introduction: Furthering a Family Affair, by Raymond Louw 
2 
 
European Union/South East Europe  
 
 
 
 

France 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Hungary   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11 
Ireland 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
16 
Italy   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19 
Serbia 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21 
Slovakia 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
24 
Spain  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25 
Turkey 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
28 
United Kingdom   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
32 
 
Former Soviet Union   
 
 
 
 
 
 
33 
Azerbaijan  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
34 
Belarus 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
36 
Kazakhstan 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
39 
Russia 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
43 
Uzbekistan  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
48 
 
Sub-Saharan Africa 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
50 
Botswana   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
51 
Burundi 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
54 
Cameroon   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
56 
Democratic Republic of Congo 
 
 
 
 
 
58 
Ethiopia 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
61 
Gambia 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
65 
Ivory Coast  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
67 
Mauritania  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
72 
Niger  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
75 
Rwanda 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
76 
Senegal 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
79 
 
Sierra Leone 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
83 
Zimbabwe   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
86 
 
 

 
 
Latin America/Caribbean 
 
 
 
 
 
 
89 
Argentina   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
90 
Brazil 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
92 
Colombia   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
94 
Cuba  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
96 
Ecuador 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
98 
Mexico 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
100 
Peru   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
102 
Uruguay   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
104 
Venezuela   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
106 
 
Asia-Pacific  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
108 
Afghanistan 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
109 
Cambodia   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
111 
China 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
115 
Fiji   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
117 
India  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
119 
Indonesia   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
122 
Malaysia   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
127 
Pakistan   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
130 
Singapore   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
132 
Thailand   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
134 
Vietnam 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
138 
 
Middle East/North Africa 
 
 
 
 
 
 
142 
Algeria 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
143 
Bahrain 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
146 
Egypt 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
150 
Iran   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
153 
Iraq   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
156 
Kuwait 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
160 
Lebanon   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
162 
Morocco   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
165 
Sudan 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
173 
Tunisia 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
174 
United Arab Emirates   
 
 
 
 
 
 
177 
Yemen 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
179

 
 
 
 
 
 

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES 
 
Patti McCracken is an independent American journalist, based in Austria. She was 
an assistant editor at The Chicago Tribune and twice a Knight International Press 
Fellow. Her articles appear in various publications, notably Smithsonian Magazine
The Christian Science Monitor and the Wall Street Journal. She has more than 15 
years experience as a journalism trainer throughout the former Soviet bloc, the 
Balkans, Southeast Asia and North Africa. She is an assistant professor at Webster 
University’s Vienna campus. 
 
Raymond Louw was editor of the anti-Apartheid newspaper the Rand Daily Mail 
in South Africa for 11 years and until 2011 editor/publisher of the weekly 
newsletter Southern Africa Report. He has campaigned for press freedom most of 
his professional life. His work against insult law and criminal defamation was part 
of a longstanding World Press Freedom Committee campaign. The International 
Press Institute named him a Press Freedom Hero in 2011.  He
 chairs the South 
African Press Council and is active in the South Africa National Editors Forum. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

INTRODUCTION
 
FURTHERING A FAMILY AFFAIR 
by Raymond Louw 
There has been some progress in Africa toward abolition of insult laws and 
criminal defamation. But there is stillfar to go. The latest step forward was when 
Niger’s 
President Mahamadou Issoufou became the first head of state to endorse 
the Declaration of Table Mountain, a text originated by press NGOs calling for 
repeal of such laws and to put press freedom higher on the agenda in Africa.
 
President Issoufou signed the Declaration in a ceremony in his capital of Niamey 
organized by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-
IFRA), the World Editors Forum, the African Editors Forum, and Niger’s Maison 
de la Presse, with more than 1,000 participants, including ambassadors and 
government officials from more than 25 countries. 
The Declaration of Table Mountain was adopted in Cape Town, South Africa in 
2007. Numerous press freedom and civil society groups -- and South Africa’s 
Nobel Peace Prize lareate Archbishop Desmond Tutu, -- have endorsed its call for 
repeal of laws that give false legal cover for the vast majority of African nations 
that continue to jail journalists and close media houses on charges of defamation or 
for "insulting" authorities or their policies. Other African leaders need to follow 
President Issoufou's example. Some are pledged to do so. 
African groups endorsing the Declaration of Table Mountain include the African 
Editors Forum, Freedom of Expression Institute, Media Institute of Southern 
Africa, Media Foundation for West Africa, Observatoire-OLPEC, the Egyptian 
Organization for Human Rights, Institute for the Advancement of Journalism, 
South African National Editors Forum, Journaliste En Danger, National Union of 
Somali Journalists and African Media Initiative. In addition to the World Press 
Freedom Committee and Freedom House, they have been joined in this by such 
international groups as International PEN, Reporters Without Borders, Article 19, 
Index on Censorship, International Press Institute, Committee to Protect 
Journalists, Media Rights Agenda, International Publishers Association and the 
Media Legal Defense Initiative. 

 
 
 
 
 
 

The World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA adopted 
the Declaration of Table Mountain at a conference in Cape Town back in June 
2007. The aims of that text are easily stated -- abolition by African nations of insult 
and criminal defamation laws and other restrictions on the operations of the media 
– but not so easily brought about. 
Alison Meston, Press Freedom Director of WAN-IFRA, who leads her group’s 
campaign on the issue, says: “In country after country, the African press is crippled 
by a panoply of repressive measures, from jailing and persecution of journalists to 
the widespread scourge of 'insult laws' and criminal defamation. Through this 
Declaration, WAN-IFRA has stated its conviction that Africa urgently needs a 
strong, free and independent press as a watchdog over public institutions.” 
 
She notes: “One of the most widely used -- and frequently abused -- elements of 
justice is criminal defamation, deployed by governments from Algiers to Pretoria, 
Dakar to Mogadishu, when it comes to suppressing information and silencing 
critical journalism. Across the continent such laws criminalize journalists, close 
publications and stifle information otherwise considered crucial to safeguard the 
public interest. Research into the number of cases based on criminal defamation 
before the 2007 Declaration, conducted for the World Press Freedom Committee -- 
an international coalition of press freedom organizations in which WAN-IFRA is 
active -- revealed an alarming frequency that severely hampers the ability of the 
press to cover issues of public concern. 
“Reporters covering corruption of public officials, police or military conduct, 
government policy decisions, public spending, even the health of kings or 
presidents, continue to be systematically hauled to court for defamation. 
Journalists, editors and publishers across the continent who resist the enormous 
pressure to self-censor and choose to tackle the so-called ‘red lines’ head on in 
their newspapers risk charges of endangering national security, destabilizing the 
country and -- in extreme cases -- treason. They are frequently jailed for exposing 
the truth and even in cases where financial compensation is deemed appropriate, 
pay recompense to plaintiffs. Exorbitant fines often far outweigh actual damage. 
Assets are seized, publications closed and often the accused risk prison when 

 
 
 
 
 
 

unable to pay. Criminalizing defamation deters investigative journalism and 
reduces the ability of the press to fill its watchdog role.” 
The link between an active and independent press, free from government 
interference and intimidation, is a key step on the road to economic, political and 
social development. There are many steps along the road involving local, regional 
and international organizations partnering both on the ground and in the 
continent’s corridors of power. A major goal in coming months is to amend the 
African Peer Review Mechanism, a mutually agreed self-monitoring instrument of 
African Union countries to review governance, so that it includes press freedom 
amongst its assessment criteria. The Declaration of Table Mountain campaign fits 
directly with this aim and has been gathering steady momentum on every level. 
After intense lobbying with policymakers, the African Commission for Human and 
Peoples’ Rights has adopted a resolution on defamation that provides a real 
possibility of meaningful change. 
In September 2010, the campaign was given a boost when Africa’s leading press 
freedom advocates -- editors, journalists and activists -- met in Nairobi, Kenya, to 
support it and form a campaign steering committee to place it in the forefront of 
press freedom in Africa. Its members include Omar Belhouchet, Director of the 
Algerian daily Al Watan: Cheriff Sy, Director of the publication Bendré in Burkina 
Faso and Deputy Chair of the African Editors Forum; Albert Twizeyimana, a 
journalist with Radio Rwanda and founder of Journalistes Libres (JOLI); and 
Gitobu Imanyara, a human rights lawyer, member of the Kenyan Parliament and 
founder of the Nairobi Law Monthly. 
 
So far, Ghana is the only African country to have fully repealed insult and criminal 
defamation laws, though a handful of others have partially decriminalized them. 
 
The campaign is gathering steam. Amongst the outspoken opponents of criminal 
defamation in Africa are Pansy Tlakula, the African Union’s Special Rapporteur 
on Freedom of Expression. 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Highlights of activities for the Table Mountain Declaration in 2010-11 included:  
 
•  The African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights passed a resolution 
to repeal criminal defamation. 
•  A meeting of the Media Foundation of West Africa, Article 19, Media Law 
Defense Initiative, Index on Censorship and legal consultant Emmanuel 
Abdulai decided to launch research into criminal defamation.  
•  The two leading presidential candidates in Niger signed the Declaration 
before 1,200 people. 
•  Editors and media rights defenders attended a daylong seminar on the 
Declaration for 20
th
 anniversary celebrations of the UNESCO-sponsored and 
endorsed Windhoek (Namibia) Declaration of African journalists, the first 
text of its kind on international commitment to press freedom.  
•  Zimbabwe’s Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai agreed at the World Justice 
Forum in Barcelona, Spain, to sign the Declaration in a public ceremony in 
Zimbabwe in 2012 
•  10 year celebrations for repeal of criminal defamation in Ghana, resulted in 
the West African Bar Association and other lawyers taking forward a high 
profile case to the Court of Justice of the 15-member Economic Community 
of West African States 
•  A campaign was launched to test Sierra Leone’s criminal defamation laws in 
the country’s Constitutional Court. 
 
I’ve waged similar campaigns all over Africa where the reception wasn’t 
encouraging. Once, I tried to persuade President Festus Mogae of Botswana to 
repeal insult laws. He would hear none of it, saying the laws protect poor citizens. 
 
As a member of the South African National Editors Forum, I was the Declaration’s 
leading drafter. For me, this is more than a matter of public interest. It’s also a 
family affair. South Africa has criminal defamation in its common law but has long 
ceased to apply it. One of the last persons tried for criminal defamation in South 
Africa was my own son Derek, as editor of the University of Witwatersrand 
student magazine, Wits Student, for “defaming” then-Prime Minister John Vorster 
and the leader of the United Party opposition Sir De Villiers Graaff. 
 
Declaration of Table Mountain: http://www.wan-press.org/article14289.html 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 


Yüklə 4,8 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə