561 doi: 10. 1590/0004-282X20160073 CliniCal scaleS, Criteria and tools validity and reliability evidence of the questionnaire for illness representation, the impact of epilepsy, and stigma (qiris)



Yüklə 156.67 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix03.02.2017
ölçüsü156.67 Kb.

561

DOI: 10.1590/0004-282X20160073



CliniCal SCaleS, Criteria and toolS

Validity and reliability evidence of the 

questionnaire for illness representation, the 

impact of epilepsy, and stigma (QIRIS)

Evidências de validade e confiabilidade do questionário de representação da doença, 

impacto da epilepsia e estigma (QIRIS)

Elisabete Abib Pedroso de Souza

1

, Karina Borges

2

, Maria Cristina O. Santos Miyazaki

2

, Karina da Silva 

Oliveira

3

, Tatiana de Cássia Nakano

3

There is growing literature indicating the importance of pa-

tient representation of illness in their behavioral responses to 

health threats

1

. Cognitive perception of the illness is studied on 



the basis of cognitive-behavioral approaches or other similar 

theories such as social cognition models or personal construct 

theory

1

. Cognitive activities that include thoughts, images and 



behaviors concerning an evaluation of the environment form 

a broad network of information that helps researchers under-

stand how patients cope with the disease. Therefore, the envi-

ronmental influences of a person’s thoughts and feelings have 

an important contribution to behavioral health

2,3


.

Researchers  in  this  field  have  made  progress  in  the  re-

search of psychological health in epilepsy by examining the 

role of cognition and coping style

4,5

. This approach is increas-



ing because patient perceptions explain greater differences in 

adaptation than biomedical variables

4,6

.

Epilepsy is a common neurological condition that affects 



the  psychological  adjustment  and  the  quality,  and  it  may 

therefore reveal a high incidence of fears, misunderstandings 

and stigma in these patients

7,8


. A chronic disease such as epi-

lepsy can be an important stress factor, and the inability to 

deal  with  the  condition  can  bring  psychological  difficulties 

1

University of Campinas – UNICAMP, Faculdade de Medicina, Departamento de Neurologia, Campinas SP, Brasil;   



2

Faculdade de Medicina de São José Rio Preto, São José do Rio Preto SP, Brasil;  

3

Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Campinas, Centro de Ciências da Vida, Departamento de Psicologia, Campinas SP, Brasil.



Correspondence: Elisabete Abib Pedroso de Souza, Hospital Universitário death Campinas – UNICAMP; Caixa Postal – 6166; 13083-970 Campinas, SP, Brasil; 

E-mail: souzaeap@yahoo.com.br



Conflict of interest: There is no conflict of interest to declare.

Received 16 November 2015; Received in final form 27 February 2016; Accepted 05 April 2016.



AbStRACt

The objective of this study was to obtain reliability and validity evidence for the questionnaire of illness representation, the impact of epilepsy, 

and stigma (QIRIS) for use with adolescents and adults in Brazil. QIRIS consists of 14 questions grouped in three domains (attribution of 

meaning, impact of disease, and stigma) and was applied to 57 adults with epilepsy. QIRIS internal consistency was satisfactory (Cronbach’s 

α = 0. 866). Significant and strong correlation was found between issues belonging to the same domain, as expected. Three domains have 

highly significant and positive correlations with the instrument’s total score, indicating evidence of content validity. We conclude that QIRIS 

has psychometric properties and can facilitate a systematic evaluation of the patient’s representation according to a biopsychosocial 

approach that may contribute to clinical practice based on scientific evidence. 

Keywords: quality of life; stigma social; epilepsy; cognitive science; surveys and questionnaires.

ReSumo

Este estudo buscou evidências de confiabilidade e validade para o questionário de representação da doença, impacto da epilepsia e 

estigma (QIRIS), para uso em adolescentes e adultos no Brasil. O QIRIS consiste de 14 questões agrupadas em 3 domínios (atribuição de 

significados, impacto da doença e estigma) e foi aplicado em 57 adultos com epilepsia. A consistência interna do QIRIS foi satisfatória 

(α de Cronbach = 0,866). Foi encontrada forte e significante correlação entre as questões com o mesmo domínio.Os três domínios têm 

correlações altamente significativas e positivas com a pontuação total do instrumento, indicando evidências de validade de conteúdo.  

Concluímos que o QIRIS tem propriedades psicométricas que facilitam uma avaliação sistemática de representação do paciente de acordo 

com uma abordagem biopsicossocial, além de contribuir para uma prática clínica baseada em evidências científicas. 

Palavras-chave: qualidade de vida; estigma social; epilepsia; ciência cognitiva; inquéritos e questionários.


562

Arq Neuropsiquiatr 2016;74(7):561-569

and  emotional  distress

9

.  Since  one  is  diagnosed  with  epi-



lepsy, having the disease activates a behavior modifying sys-

tem of beliefs at the personal and social level. Furthermore, 

it involves expectations and perceptions that are individual 

intrapsychic categories related to each individual life story, 

which affects people in different manners

7



An individual’s beliefs about his/her symptoms, diagnosis, 

label, causality, perception of duration, consequences of the 

disease, and perception of control integrate his or her con-

cept of “self ”

10,11

 with implications for feelings, behavior, and 



adjustment. Not only for the individual with epilepsy, but also 

for the entire family, especially because of the stigma related 

to this illness. The relationship between subjective variables, 

disease and socio-environmental demand is complex.

The illness representation theory supports the fact that 

all patients construct cognitive models of their illness, and 

also the fact that there is a dynamic relationship between its 

elements, where a patient’s cognitive perception changes in 

line with illness experience and consequences

1,7


.

The  first  approaches  related  to  illness  beliefs  were  ob-

tained  from  structured  interviews  with  qualitative  analysis 

without psychometric validation

10

 and other studies using a 



closed  questionnaire  with  quantitative  measures

12,13


.  Kemp 

and Morley

1

 were the first to develop an interview that com-



bines open questions and a structured questionnaire.

Based on Kemp’s model, we developed a new psychologi-

cal protocol in order to assess cognitive representations in 

adults and adolescents with epilepsy.

Therefore,  this  paper  aimed  to  find  reliability  and  valid-

ity  evidence  for  the  questionnaire  of  illness  representation, 

the impact of epilepsy, and stigma (QIRIS) and its use in Brazil.

metHoD 

Development of measure

Initially,  the  literature  about  related  meanings,  quality 

of  life  and  stigma  was  reviewed.Some  general  points  have 

emerged  from  this  literature,  such  as:  1-  All  patients  form 

representations early in the course of illness, and this repre-

sentation affects individual perception of their quality of life 

and, especially, individual perception of discrimination and 

rejection; 2- For an assessment of these beliefs, it is impor-

tant to make use of the psychological interview, to enable a 

qualitative analysis of subjective variables. In this study, the 

approach was to combine open-ended questions with rating 

scales, administrated in an interview format.

Aiming  to  evaluate  how  the  impact  of  epilepsy  is  per-

ceived in our environment, an open exploratory 16-question 

questionnaire was developed. It sought to contemplate the 

main  domains  of  epilepsy  representation  and  our  clinical 

experience in epilepsy. Questionnaire respondents included 

20 patients and 20 lay people from the local community

14

.

Briefly, the overall result showed that there is poor knowl-



edge of epilepsy among interviewees, although most of them 

have received information from their doctors. Concerning the 

social aspects, most of them referred to difficulties in work 

and school environments, also in establishing relationships. 

The main epilepsy related feelings reported by the subjects 

included sadness, dependence, inferiority, insecurity, fear and 

pity

14

. The open questionnaire was important to raise initial 



reactions about the concepts of epilepsy as well as the emo-

tional and social adjustment.

Based on the results of this first questionnaire, a panel of 

three independent specialists evaluated the questions; after-

wards, the most appropriate items were chosen

15

. The ques-



tionnaire  used  for  the  community  had  16  closed  questions 

about  the  medical  (4  questions),  social  (10  questions)  and 

personal (2 questions) areas. The patients questionnaire had 

four additional questions in the social and three in the per-

sonal area to be answered in the form of multiple-choice.The 

instrument was answered by 12 patients and 32 relatives from 

the Epilepsy Outpatients Clinic at the University Hospital of 

Campinas. Considering that patient beliefs are frequently in-

fluenced  and  reinforced  by  family  members

3

,  family  beliefs 



should be investigated in parallel to the patients’

16 


in a broad-

er process of data collection.

The  results  are  grouped  in  three  main  domains:  medi-

cal, social and personal. Medical: patients and relatives did 

not know exactly what epilepsy is or how it is caused; none-

theless, they know how to treat it. Social: the most impor-

tant  areas  where  people  with  epilepsy  are  discriminated 

are work and social relationships. Patients also complained 

about their lack of freedom and limits on recreation activi-

ties. Personal: subjects apparently have the same feelings and 

thoughts about epilepsy and seizures

15

.



Therefore,  at  the  present  stage,  in  order  to  validate 

the  instrument  to  assess  the  perception  of  stigma  in 

the  community,  we  selected  the  most  common  answers 

(50% cut off) in order to create the items for a version of 

stigma  scale  of  epilepsy  (SSE)  containing  five  questions, 

with  twenty-four  items

17

.  According  to  the  results,  the 



points focused on the five-question scale were sufficient 

to achieve this objective

18

.

Our intention now is different, as we seek to understand 



the psychological (cognitive and emotional) aspects related 

to the disease, as important contingencies in adaptive reac-

tions, from the perspective of the individual who has epilepsy.

The  new  questionnaire  included  answers  identified 

in  the  social  context  (patients,  relatives  and  community 

members) related to disease perception and impact, and as 

a  psychological  interview  was  drawn  from  questionnaires 

aimed at assessing cognitive representations. In this sense, 

it is important to note that the work of Weinman et al.

13

 and 



the research model developed by Kemp and Morley

served 



as the basis for the final model that was selected as the ba-

sis for the scale proposed.



563

Elisabete Abib Pedroso de Souza et al. Validity and reliability of QIRIS

The illness perception questionnaire (IPQ)

13

 comprises 



5 brief scales assessing the core components of an illness 

representation and appears to be psychometrically sound.

The five scales assess identity: 1) the symptoms the patient 

associates with the illness, cause; 2) personal ideas about 

etiology, time-line; 3) the perceived duration of the illness, 

consequences; 4) expected effects, and outcome and cure 

control;  5)  how  one  controls  or  recovers  from  the  illness. 

Each scale presents items whose content must be accepted 

or not by the patient.

Kemp  and  Morley

1

  aimed  to  assess  six  representation 



components  of  illness  (identity,  beliefs  about  symptoms 

and  cause,  consequences,  beliefs  about  temporal  course, 

control beliefs, self-illness relationship). The importance of 

the last one is based on the fact that the authors

1

 introduce 



open questions and include the item” consequences”, which 

investigates perceived stigma and enacted stigma

1

.

It is important to say that this new instrument that we 



are investigating maintains, in the same way proposed by 

other  models

1

,  open  questions  about  stigma  perception, 



but it also includes constructs linked to quality of life. The 

ease and speed of the application and correction process, 

which is indeed easier than others, are shown in a differen-

tial work in a hospital.

This  version  of  the  questionnaire  (Appendix)  for  illness 

representation,  the  impact  of  epilepsy,  and  stigma  (QIRIS) 

was composed of 14 questions grouped in three domains—

attribution of meaning, impact of the disease, and stigma—

and was tested with the aim of investigating its psychometric 

properties. The results of validity and reliability of the ques-

tionnaire  for  illness  representation,  the  impact  of  epilepsy, 

and stigma (QIRIS) will be presented. 



Subjects

57 patients were involved in this study (71.93% female 

and 28.07% male) who were assisted at the epilepsy clinic 

located  in  a  University  Hospital.  Participant  ages  ranged 

between 21 and 62 years (21% below 30 years, 26.32% aged 

30-39years; 35.1% 40-49 years, and 17.54%, above 50 years), 

31.43%  were  single,  separated  or  divorced,  61.86%  were 

married; 7.7% were widowed; 56.14% were unemployed and 

43.86% had a job; 68.42% have ≤ 8 years of education; and 

31.57% have ≥ 9 years of education. 

The  clinical  data    indicated  that  31.55%  had  focal  sei-

zures,54.39%  showed  focal  plus  generalized  seizures,  and 

14% had generalized seizures. Other data collected refer to 

the age at onset of seizures (M = 19.33, SD = 12.3), disease du-

ration (M = 17.22, SD = 12.1), and medication (monotherapy: 

85.7%, polytherapy: 14.3%). 

For this study, the inclusion criteria were: age between 18 

and 65, ability to answer the questions, and presence of ac-

tive epilepsy within the past 2 years. Patients were excluded 

if they had brain surgery, used concomitant medication with 

central  nervous  system  effects,  or  had  another  progressive 

neurological or psychiatric illness. 

UNICAMP’s  Committee  of  Ethics  in  Medicine  ap-

proved this study. Written informed consent was obtained 

from the patients.

Instruments

1) Clinical and demographic identification questionnaire 

containing  information  on  age,  education,  marital  status, 

occupation, age of onset and duration of illness, seizure fre-

quency, type of seizure and medication used.

2) The  questionnaire  for  illness  representation,  the 

impact  of  epilepsy,  and  stigma  (QIRIS)  is  composed 

of  3  parts:  I)  Attribution  of  meaning  [three  open  ques-

tions:  a)  Q1  –  Label;  b)  Q2  –  Causal  Attributions;  and 

c) Q5 – Projecting Consequences; and four Likert ques-

tions: a)  Q3 – Perceptions of Feelings; b) Q4 – Perception 

of Controllability; c) Q6 - Coping; and d) Q7 – Perception 

of  Social  Consequences];  II)  Impact  of  Disease  [a  sin-

gle  open  question:  Q8  –  Experience  of  difficulties;  and 

two Likert questions: a) Q9 – Perceptions of difficulties; 

b) Q10 – Quality of Life], and III) Stigma [one open ques-

tion: Q11 – Experience of Stigma; and three Likert ques-

tions: a) Q12 – Perceived Discrimination; b) Q13 – Stigma; 

and c) Q14 – Perceived Stigma]. 

In the Likert questions, subjects can choose 1 of 4 alter-

natives,  indicating  how  much  they  agree  with  the  content. 

Some items are inverted in the correction process (Q4, Q6.1, 

Q6.2, Q7.2, Q7.3, Q7.4, and Q10). The sum of the total in each 

area is achieved by adding the scores of all items. The total 

scale  is  calculated  by  adding  the  scores  of  the  three  areas. 

The higher the total score, the more negative beliefs and the 

greater the impact on patient health.

Procedures

Instruments  were  applied  in  the  Applied  Psychology 

Clinic  of  the  Neurology  University  Hospital,  UNICAMP, 

Campinas/SP,  Brazil.  Patients  completed  the  identification 

protocol and the questionnaire under the same conditions. 

The instruments were administered as an interview in adults 

with epilepsy.

ReSuLtS

Statistical  analyses  were  performed  using  version  16.0 

of  the  Statistical  Package  for  Social  Sciences  (SPSS)  for 

Windows.Reliability was assessed by tests of internal con-

sistency  for  each  domain  using  Cronbach’s  alpha  coeffi-

cient.  The  results  are  presented  in  Table  1.  In  the  second 

analysis, the Spearman correlation was calculated between 

items (inter-score correlation) (Table 2). At the end, the cor-

relation  between  domains  assessed  by  the  Questionnaire 

was calculated (Table 3). 



564

Arq Neuropsiquiatr 2016;74(7):561-569

To  carry  out  the  statistical  analysis,  some  QIRIS  scores 

have to be reversed. These items are: Q4, Q6.1, Q6.2, Q7.2, Q7.3, 

Q7.4, Q10. It is also important to note that Q4 (Perception of 

Controllability), Q10 (Quality of Life), and Q13 (Stigma) do-

mains  comprise  only  one  item  each,  so  Cronbach’s  coeffi-

cient is not calculated for these cases.

The  analysis  of  internal  consistency  generally  showed 

that all items presented high values. Similarly, the total score 

also showed an adequate value (0.866). Considering each do-

main separately, we can see that Domain 1 – Attribution of 

meaning presented a .763 internal consistency. The results of 

the items that composed this domain showed good values 

for Q3 (.771), moderate value for Q7 (.559) and lower consis-

tency for Q6 (.215). In Domain 2 – Disease impact, consisten-

cy was .794 (Q9 presented a .775 value). Domain 3 – Stigma 

had .842 internal consistency and its Q9 and Q14 areas had 

.773 and .733, respectively. 

We can thus verify that the questionnaire had good in-

ternal consistency. The exception occurs in the Q7 – Social 

Consequences domain, which is lower than other domains, 

and in the Q6 – Coping domain, which presented an inad-

equate value. This is why future studies should consider re-

moving Q6.4 (item with the least consistency). For the time 

being, in face of the small sample size, we can consider that 

the  questionnaire  presented  good  psychometric  standards 

related to reliability.

In order to understand the internal stability of the instru-

ment,  we  investigated  the  correlations  between  the  scores 

of  items  of  the  questionnaire

19

.  This  analysis  was  based  on 



Spearman’s correlation coefficient and is shown in Table 2.

According  to  the  data,  positive  and  significant  corre-

lations were found between Q6 and Q7 (r = 0.53, p ≤ 0.001), 

Q9 and Q10 (r = 0.57, p ≤ 0.001), Q12 and Q13 (r = 0.43, p ≤ 

0.01), and Q12 and Q14 (r = 0.72, p ≤ 0.0001). The correlations 

between Q3 and Q4 was negative (-0.78, p ≤ 0.0001).

Remarkably,  in  Domain  1  –  Attribution  of  meaning, 

the  correlation  between  Perception  of  Feelings  (Q3)  and 

Perception of Controllability (Q4) was significant, but neg-

ative.  Positive  and  significant  correlations  between  the 

questions  that  evaluate  Coping  (Q6)  and  Perception  of 

social consequences (Q7) were also observed. In Domain 

2 – Impact of Disease, the correlation between Perception 

of  difficulties  (Q9)  and  Quality  of  Life  (Q10)  was  signifi-

cant  and  positive;  in  Domain  3  –  Stigma,  the  correla-

tion between Perceived Discrimination (Q12) and Stigma 

(Q13)  as  well  as  the  correlation  between  Perceived 

Discrimination  (Q12)  and  Perceived  Stigma  (Q14)  were 

positive  and  significant.  The  only  relationship  that  was 

not  significant  occurred  between  Q13  (Stigma)  and  Q14 

(Perceived Stigma), belonging to the Stigma Domain. 

Considering  that  we  hypothesized  significant  and 

strong  correlations  between  issues  belonging  to  the 

same  domain,  it  was  possible  to  note  that  most  results 

met the expectations. 

Table  3  shows  an  analysis  of  correlations  between  the 

domains of the instrument. Therefore, it is possible to ob-

serve that the three domains have highly significant posi-

tive  correlations  with  the  total  score  of  the  instrument, 

Part 1 (r = 0.52; p ≤ 0.001), Part 2 (r = 0.75; p ≤ 0.0001), and 

Part 3 (r = 0.66; p ≤ 0.0001). It is also worth pointing out that 

Part 1 and Part 3 had a positive and significant correlation 

with each other (r = 0:35; p ≤ 0.01).

Table 1. Internal consistency of QIRIS questionnaire.

Part / Domains

Cronbach’s alpha 

coefficient

Part 1 – Attribution of Meaning

.763

Q3 – Perception of Feelings



.771

Q6 – Coping

.215

Q7 – Social Consequences



.559

Part 2 – Disease Impact

.794

Q9 – Perception of Difficulties



.755

Part 3 – Stigma

.842

Q12 – Perceived Discrimination



.773

Q14 – Perceived Stigma

.733

Total 


.866

Table 2. Spearman correlations between items of QIRIS questionnaire.

Item

Q3

Q4



Q6

Q7

Q9



Q10

Q12


Q13

 Q4


-0.78***

-

-



-

-

-



 

-

Q6



0.12

-0.18


-

-

-



-

-

-



Q7

0.35


-0.32

0.53**


-

-

-



-

-

Q9



0.06

0.18


0,24

0.21


-

-

-



-

Q10


-0.03

0.13


-0.04

0.04


0.57**

-

-



-

Q12


0.09

0.05


0.05

0.22


0.26

0.03


-

-

Q13



0.15

0.01


-0.09

-0.10


0.01

-0.02


0.43*

-

Q14



0.05

0.02


0.21

0.30


0.29

0.06


0.72***

-0.14


*p ≤ 0.01; **p ≤ 0.001; ***p ≤ 0.0001 

565

Elisabete Abib Pedroso de Souza et al. Validity and reliability of QIRIS

The purpose of the open questions in this questionnaire 

is to provide a qualitative analysis, though this type of analy-

sis was not the subject of this paper. However, we found it in-

teresting to show that the open questions are related to one 

another,  and  thus  established  the  criteria  considering  the 

question that starts each domain. These questions were cat-

egorized  and  the  analysis  involved  the  Mann-Whitney  test 

and showed interesting and expected results. 

The  results  showed  that  the  Q1-Label  related  with 

Diagnosis (Yes / No) was significant with Q9 –Perceptions 

of Difficulties (p = 0.004). Furthermore, Q1 – Meaning of ep-

ilepsy  (Negative  /  Positive)  showed  significant  differences 

for Coping – Q6 (p = 0.043), Perceptions of Difficulties – Q9 

(p  =  0.039),  and  had  significant  correlation  with  the  total 

score of Part 2 – Quality of life (p = 0.039) and Total score 

of  QIRIS  (p  =  0.045).  Open  question  Q8  –  Experience 

of  Difficulties  was  significant  with  Q9  –  Perceptions  of 

Difficulties (p = 0.004) and total score of Part 2 – Quality of 

life (p = 0.005).Q11 – Stigma experience (Negative / Positive) 

was not associated with any question of the QIRIS.

The  validity  based  on  Mann-Whitney  test  was  per-

formed to examine the relationship between the scores 

of  the  QIRIS  and  socio-demographic  variables.No 

Employed was significant with Part1 and Part3 (p = 0.028 

and  p  =  0.035,  respectively)  and  also  with  questions  Q3 

(p = 0.023), Q4 (p = 0.0054), and Q13 (p = 0.021). The re-

lationship between Marital status and Perceived stigma 

(Q14) was significant (p = 0.048). Education was positive-

ly related with Part1 (p = 0.049). Based on Kruskall-Wallis 

test, we compared the clinical variables that showed dif-

ferences  between  focal  plus  generalized  seizures  and 

generalized seizures (p = 0.047).



DISCuSSIoN

This study aimed to describe a new questionnaire to as-

sess epilepsy representations, impact of disease and stigma. 

The  purpose  comprised  the  psychological  (cognitive  and 

emotional) aspects related to the disease as important con-

tingencies in adaptive reactions.

During the development of the questionnaire process and 

the search for validation evidence, an important step to men-

tion is the need for methodological accuracy in relation to 

the theoretical background, objectives, and conditions that 

will emerge and the level of analysis (use in clinical practice 

or research). Based on that, all phases of the study related in 

this paper were important.

The new questionnaire, as a psychological interview, was 

drawn from questionnaires aimed to assess cognitive repre-

sentations, including the answers identified in the social con-

text (patients, relatives, and community people). This is a ma-

jor contribution and an advantage.

In  this  sense,  the  questionnaire  showed  good  psycho-

metric standards. The QIRIS items proved to be interdepen-

dent and homogeneous in terms of the concepts they mea-

sure,  as  indicated  by  the  Cronbach  coefficients  and  scale 

inter-correlation. Reliability and accuracy were satisfactory.

Although questions Q6 and Q7 were slightly below 0.70 in 

the Cronbach analysis, these items appear closely related in 

scale inter-correlation.

We hypothesized strong correlations among questions 

with  the  same  content  and  that  has  been  showed  in  sev-

eral  studies

9,20,21


.  People  who  perceive  poor  control  of  the 

disease (Q4) are found to usually experience more negative 

feelings (Q3), and this was a highly significant correlation. 

An important psychological aspect to be highlighted is the 

belief that they have little personal control, and such a gen-

eral outlook is associated with a more passive stance and 

depressive thinking

22

.



Thus,  positive  correlations  were  also  expected  be-

tween  questions  Q6  and  Q7,  which  assess  coping  and 

social  consequences,  and  this  result  was  confirmed. 

Inappropriate strategies are known to contribute to dis-

tortions in social perception and to negative assessment 

of the social consequences

7,9

.

Similarly, questions Q9 and Q10 showed a high correla-



tion, reinforcing the concept that the perception of difficul-

ties  in  everyday  life  is  associated  with  a  worse  assessment 

of  patient  well-being/quality  of  life

7,9


.  Question  Q12  sought 

to  assess  perception  of  discrimination  and  showed  highly 

significant  correlation  with  questions  assessing  perceived 

stigma (Q13) and internalized discrimination (Q14). Several 

studies

20,21 


call attention to the fact that, after a situation is 

evaluated  stressful,    the  patient  usually  experiences  nega-

tive feelings and dysfunctional behaviors. Souza and Salgado

9

 



also discuss the psychological process involved.

The  three  areas  also  showed  highly  significant  correla-

tions with the total QIRIS score. These results can reinforce 

the evidence of construct validity (when the empirical data 

confirm the theory) and content validity ( fulfilling important 

aspects of the investigated construct)

19

. The investigation of 



other types of validity evidence, for example, criteria valid-

ity  and  factor  analysis  could  help  researchers  to  verify  the 

instrument dimensionality and add important results to the 

process of instrument construction.

We can see that the instrument enables an interconnec-

tion of the different aspects involved in evaluating the dis-

ease, supporting the concept that cognitive representations 

Table 3. Spearman correlations between QIRIS domains.

 Variable

Part1


Part2

Part3


Part2

.16


-

-

Part3



.35*

.14


-

Total


.52**

0.75***


0.66***

*p ≤ 0.01; **p ≤ 0.001; ***p ≤ 0.0001 



566

Arq Neuropsiquiatr 2016;74(7):561-569

are individual, and controlling the way patients deal with 

the disease also affects adjustment, well-being and the per-

ception of stigma

9,10,11


.

Another aspect in this study was to combine open-ended 

questions with rating scales, administrated in interview for-

mat. In our study, open questions were important to activate 

relevant  ideas  and  emotions  related  to  epilepsy,  according 

to Antonak and Rankin

23

. Following the model developed by 



Kemp and Morley

1

, we were the first to develop an interview 



combining open questions and a structured questionnaire to 

assess six representation components of illness.

In our attempt to test if open questions related with oth-

er QIRIS questions, the results were satisfactory, explaining 

more variables and their contents.

Remarkably as well, when we take into account Brazil’s 

socioeconomic  reality,  the  use  of  perception  inventories 

through  interviews  assists  people  with  low  education. 

For that population, it is better to avoid the use of abstract 

terminology,  extensive  instructions,  and  wide  ranging  con-

tents

24

. Accordingly, the use of both open questions and the 



Likert type of questions enabled the authors to collect more 

reliable data. This is one of the contributions that the instru-

ment aims to bring to the area, as it offers broader and more 

adequate  possibilities  to  evaluate  the  different  population 

strata in terms of educational and social level.

In recent decades, there has been greater interest in the 

study of variables that control the impact of epilepsy, variables 

that go beyond the seizures, remarkably the importance of 

psychosocial conditions and their influence in determining 

the well-being of individuals in chronic medical conditions. 

In  contrast  to  the  medical  model,  the  socio-psychological 

model assumes that other personal characteristics affect the 

degree to which patients feel affected in their well-being and 

stigmatized by their condition

2,22

.

Alongside the development of measures is a need to in-



crease  our  knowledge  of  the  functional  dimensions  associ-

ated with neurological disorders.

The  result  of  the  assessment  depends  on  information 

brought  by  the  individual  patient  and  his/her  symptoms, 

behavioral patterns, perceptions of the disease, and aspects 

of his/her life. This approach encourages clinicians to see pa-

tients as active processors and theorists of their condition, 

and to examine the condition from a patient’s perspective.

This is inherently a psychological approach that has the 

potential  to  provide  greater  understanding  of  what  guides 

patients’ behavior

3,25


. Chronic diseases involve a large num-

ber of behavioral variables, and the scientific question that 

emerges is: how to explain the relationship between behav-

ior and health and behavior and disease, and how to demon-

strate control of this relationship?

We  believe  that  this  instrument  is  a  promising  tool  in 

clinical evaluation and research on adults with epilepsy. The 

results presented in this paper showed that the QIRIS pres-

ents psychometric properties and it is a valid and reliable in-

strument to assess the psychological aspects related with the 

meaning of the disease and the interrelation between quality 

of life and stigma. 

Considering that the research reported here consists of 

the first studies with the instrument, and before the posi-

tive findings, future studies will have to be conducted in 

order to investigate other aspects not covered here. Such 

analysis will allow new evidence of the quality of the pro-

posed instruments, as well as their suitability for its pur-

pose and target population.

References

1. 


Kemp S, Morley S. The development of a method to assess 

patients’ cognitive representations of epilepsy. Epilepsy Behav. 

2001;2(3):247-71. doi:10.1006/ebeh.2001.0179

2. 


Kendall PC. Guiding theory for therapy with children and 

adolescents. In: Kendall PC, editor. Child and adolescent therapy: 

cognitive-behavioral procedures. 3rd  ed. New York: Guilford; 

2006. p. 3-32.

3. 

Hirani SH, Newman SP. Patients’ beliefs about their cardiovascular 



disease. Heart. 2005;91(9):1235-39. doi:10.1136/hrt.2003.025262

4. 


Kemp S, Morley S, Anderson E. Coping with epilepsy: do illness 

representations play a role? Br J Clin Psychol. 1999;38(1):43-58. 

doi:10.1348/014466599162656

5. 


Upton D, Thompson PJ. Effectiveness of coping strategies employed 

by people with chronic epilepsy. J Epilepsy. 1992;5:119-27. 

doi:10.1016/S0896-6974(05)80059-3

6. 


Meador KJ.  Research use of the news quality of life of 

epilepsy inventory. Epilepsia. 1993;34(suppl 4):34-8. 

doi:10.1111/j.1528-1157.1993.tb05914.x

7. 


Souza, E.A.P. [Protocol of quality of life in epilepsy: preliminary 

results]. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2001;59(3A):541-4. Portuguese. 

doi:10.1590/S0004-282X2001000400011

8. 


Li LM, Sander JW. [National demonstration project on epilepsy 

in Brazil]. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2003;61(1):153-6. Portuguese. 

doi:10.1590/S0004-282X2003000100033

9. 


Souza EAP, Salgado PCB. A psychosocial view of anxiety and 

depression in epilepsy. Epilepsy Behav. 2006;8(1):232-8. 

doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2005.10.011

10. 


Leventhal, H.;Nerenz, D.R. The assessment of illness cognition. 

In:  Karole P, editor. Measurement strategies in health psychology. 

New York: Wiley; 1986. p. 517-54.

11. 


Leventhal H, Diefenbach M. The active side of illness cognition. 

In: Skelton JA, Croyle RT, editors. Mental representations in health 

and illness. New York: Springer, 1991.

12. 


Turk DC, Rudy TE, Salovey P. Implicit models of illness. J Behav Med. 

1986;9(5):517-54. doi:10.1007/BF00845133

13. 

Weinman J, Petrie KJ, Moss-Morris R, Horne R. The illness 



perception questionnaire: a new method for assessing the cognitive 

representations of illness. Psychol Health. 1996;11(3):431-45. 

doi:10.1080/08870449608400270

14. 


Fernandes PT, Salgado PC, Noronha ALA, Barbosa FD, Souza EA, 

Li LM. Stigma Scale of Epilepsy: conceptual issues. J Epilepsy Clin 

Neuropshysiol. 2004;10:213-8.


567

Elisabete Abib Pedroso de Souza et al. Validity and reliability of QIRIS

15. 

Salgado PC, Fernandes PT, Noronha AL, Barbosa FD, Souza 



EA, Li LM. The second step in the construction of a stigma 

scale of epilepsy. Arq Neuropsiquiatr.  2005;63(2B):395-8. 

doi:10.1590/S0004-282X2005000300005    

16. 


Freitas-Lima P, Monteiro EA,  Macedo LR, Funayama SS, Ferreira 

FI, Matias Júnior I et al .The social context and the need of 

information from patients with epilepsy: evaluating a tertiary 

referral service. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2015;73(4):298-303. 

doi:10.1590/0004-282X20150007

17. 


Fernandes PT, Salgado PC, Noronha AL, Sander JW, Li LM. 

Stigma scale of epilepsy: validation process. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 

2007;65(suppl 1):35-42. doi:10.1590/S0004-282X2007001000006

18. 


Fernandes PT, Noronha AL, Sander JW, Li LM. Stigma 

scale of epilepsy: the  perception of stigma in different 

cities in Brazil. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2008;66(3A):471-6. 

doi:10.1590/S0004-282X2008000400006

19. 

Bowling A. Measuring health: a review of quality of life 



measurements scales. Buckingham: Open University Press; 1997. 

20. 


Kanner  AM. Depression in epilepsy is much more 

reative process. Epilepsy Currents.  2003;3(6):202-3. 

doi:10.1046/j.1535-7597.2003.03609.x

21. 


Suurmeijer TP, Reuvekamp MF, Aldenkamp BP. Social functioning, 

psychological functioning, and quality of life in epilepsy. Epilepsia. 

2001;42(9):1160-8. doi:10.1046/j.1528-1157.2001.37000.x

22. 


Herman B, Jacoby, A. The psychosocial impact of epilepsy in adults. 

Epilepsy  Behav.  2009;(15):S11-6. doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2009.03.029

23. 

Antonak F, Rankin PR. Measurement and analysis of knowledge and 



attitudes toward epilepsy and persons with epilepsy. Soc Sci Med. 

1982;16(30):1591-3. doi:10.1016/0277-9536(82)90170-8

24. 

Rosal MC, Carbone ET, Goins KV. Use of cognitive interviewing to 



adapt measurements for low-literate Hispanics. Diabetes Educ. 

2003;29(6):1006-17. doi:10.1177/014572170302900611

25. 

Sawant N, Kinra V. An Indian study on perceptions of patients of 



epilepsy and their family to stigma and its impact on quality of life. 

Am J Clin Neurol Neurosurgery.  2015;1(1):1-9.



568

Arq Neuropsiquiatr 2016;74(7):561-569



APPeNDIx: QueStIoNNAIRe of ILLNeSS 

RePReSeNtAtIoN, ePILePSy’S ImPACt AND 

StIgmA (QIRIS)

This interview is important to know what you think and 

feel about what you have and we can serve you better.

You  will  answer  some  questions  that  are  open  and  in 

others you must choose one of the scale: 1-Never, 2- Rarely, 

3-Often, 4-Always.



PARt 1 - AttRIbutIoN of meANINg

1. Label. 

1.1 What the name or diagnosis about the 

symptoms that you have?

_______________________________________________

________________________________________________

1.2 What meaning have seizure /epilepsy that you 

experienced?

_______________________________________________

________________________________________________

2. Causal attributions

What do you think caused epilepsy in your case? 

________________________________________________

3. Perception of feelings 

What do you feel when you are in seizures?

3.1 Depression   

1

2



3

4

3.2 Shock   



1

2

3



4

3.3 Fear   

1

2

3



4

3.4 Anxiety   

1

2

3



4

3.5 Sorry for yourself   

1

2

3



4

3.6  Others ______________________



4. Perception of Controllability

Do you think that you have control over your seizure?

1

2

3



4

5. Projecting consequences 

How you imagine your future having seizures? 

________________________________________________

6. Coping

How the people with epilepsy often act?

6.1 Talking to persons about disease.    

1

2



3

4

6.2 Looking for medical treatment. 



1

2

3



4

6.3 Withdrawal   

1

2

3



4

6.4 Act as if they had not epilepsy   

1

2

3



4

6.5 Others ______________________



7. Perception of Social Consequences

What do you guess people think to see someone hav-

ing seizure?

7.1 Fear   

1

2

3



4

7.2 Pity   

1

2

3



4

7.3 They know it’s a seizure   

1

2

3



4

7.4 Help   

1

2

3



4

7.5 They think that it is a contagious disease 

1

2

3



4

7.6 Others ______________________



PARt 2- ImPACt of DISeASe ( QuALIty of LIfe)

8. experience of difficulties 

Can you talk about some difficulties which you have be-

cause of your seizures?

_______________________________________________

________________________________________________

9. Perceptions of difficulties

Which difficulties do you think that people with epilepsy 

have in their daily life?

9.1 Family relationships   

1

2

3



4

9.2 Employment   

1

2

3



4

9.3 School   

1

2

3



4

9.4 Friendship / Dating   

1

2

3



4

9.5 Sexuality   

1

2

3



4

9.6 Emotional   

1

2

3



4

9.7 Prejudice   

1

2

3



4

569

Elisabete Abib Pedroso de Souza et al. Validity and reliability of QIRIS

9.8 Health   

1

2



3

4

10. Quality of life

What score would you rate your quality of life (satisfaction in 

the aspects mentioned above, as follows: 1 = poor, 10 = great) ?

1

2

3



4

5

6



7

8

9



10

PARt 3 - exPeRIeNCe of StIgmA

11. Can you tell of any situation where people 

have actually treaded you unfairly because you 

having seizure.

_______________________________________________

________________________________________________

12. Perceived discrimination

In what situation do you think a person with epilepsy is 

discriminated?

12.1 Family relationships   

1

2

3



4

12.2. Friendship   

1

2

3



4

12.3. Employment   

1

2

3



4

12.4. School   

1

2

3



4

12.5. Dating   

1

2

3



4

13. Stigma

What  score  would  you  rate  for  the  prejudice  that  the 

general population has towards epilepsy (1 = no prejudice, 

10 = maximum prejudice)? 

1

2

3



4

5

6



7

8

9



10

14. Perceived Stigma

Do you agree?

14.1 I care when people are afraid of me because of epilepsy

1

2



3

4

14.2 I care when people do not take my opinions as seri-



ously as would take if I had not epilepsy.

1

2



3

4

14.3 I consider myself imperfect because of epilepsy.



1

2

3



4

14.4 People who know I have seizures treat me differently

1

2

3



4

14.5 I have few friends because I have epilepsy

1

2

3



4

14.6 I care what people think of me when they saw me 

having a seizure.

1

2



3

4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə