Blood and endocrine system diseases in children. Lesson Topics: Hemorrhagic disease in children



Yüklə 1,02 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/7
tarix24.04.2020
ölçüsü1,02 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

Blood and endocrine system diseases in children.  

Lesson 3.  

Topics:  

Hemorrhagic  disease  in  children.

 

Hemophilia,  thrombocytopenia  and 



thrombocytopathies 

children. 

Etiology 

Pathogenesis. 

Classification. 

Diagnostics.  Differential  diagnosis  with  other  hemorrhagic  conditions  in 

children.  Treatment.  Emergency  treatment  of  bleeding  and  hemorrhagic 

conditions requiring treatment.  

 

International Guidelines: 

Clinacal 

Practice 

guidelines

Henoch-Schonlein 



purpura 

http://www.rch.org.au/clinicalguide/guideline_index/HenochSchonlein_Purpura/

 

The American Society of Hematology 2011 evidence-based practice 



guideline for immune thrombocytopenia 

http://www.bloodjournal.org/content/bloodjournal/117/16/4190.full.pdf

  

GUIDELINES FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEMOPHILIA 



http://www.hemoacademy.cz/dokumenty/guidelines_mng.pdf

 

 

 

Introduction:  All  hemorrhagic  diatheses  are  divided  into  3  groups, 

depending  on  the  type  and  cause  of  hemorrhagic  syndrome:  vasopathies, 

thrombopathias, coagulopathies.  

 

IMMUNE THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA (ITP) 

  Autoantibodies against platelet surface 



  Clinical presentation 

o  Typically 1–4 weeks after a nonspecific viral infection 

o  Most 1–4 years of age → sudden onset of petechiae and purpura with 



or without mucous membrane bleeding 

o  Most resolve within 6 months 

o  <1% with intracranial hemorrhage 


o  10–20% develop chronic ITP 

  Labs 



o  Platelets <20,000/mm3 

o  Platelet size normal to increased 

o  Other cell lines normal 

o  Bone marrownormal to increased megakaryocytes 

Treatment 

o  Transfusion  contraindicated  unless  life-threatening  bleeding  (platelet 

antibodies will bind to transfused platelets as well) 

o  No specific treatment if platelets >20,000 and no ongoing bleeding 

o  If  very  low  platelets,  ongoing  bleeding  that  is  difficult  to  stop  or  life-

threatening: 



Intravenous immunoglobulin for 1–2 days 

o  If inadequate response, then prednisone 

o  Splenectomy reserved for older child with severe disease 

Immune  Thrombocytopenic  Purpura  (idiopathic  thrombocytopenic 

purpura,  autoimmune  thrombocytopenic  purpura,  primary  thrombocytopenic 

purpura) 

Background:  Immune  thrombocytopenic  purpura  (ITP)  is  a  clinical 

syndrome 

in 

which 


decreased 

number 

of 


circulating 

platelets 

(thrombocytopenia)  present  as  a  bleeding  tendency,  easy  bruising  (purpura),  or 

extravasation  of  blood  from  capillaries  into  skin  and  mucous  membranes 

(petechiae).  

Pathophysiology:  An  abnormal  autoantibody,  usually  immunoglobulin  G 

(IgG) with specificity for one or more platelet membrane glycoproteins, binds to 

circulating platelet membranes.  

Immunoglobulin-coated  platelets  induce  receptor–mediated  phagocytosis 

by  mononuclear  macrophages,  primarily  but  not  exclusively  in  the  spleen.  The 

spleen is  the key  organ in  the pathophysiology  of  ITP, not  only  because platelet 

autoantibodies  are  formed  in  the  white  pulp,  but  also  because  the 


immunoglobulin-coated  platelets  are  destroyed  by  mononuclear  macrophages  in 

the red pulp.  

If  bone  marrow  megakaryocytes  are  not  able  to  increase  production  and 

maintain a normal number of circulating platelets, thrombocytopenia and purpura 

develop.  

Frequency: The annual incidence of chronic ITP has been estimated to be 

1 in 10,000 



Mortality/Morbidity:  The  most  frequent  cause  of  death  in  ITP  is 

spontaneous or accidental, trauma-induced intracranial bleeding in patients whose 

platelet counts are less than 10,000 per µL. This situation occurs in 1-2% of cases. 

Sex: In children, the incidence is the same among males and females.  

Age: Children may be affected at any age, but the peak incidence occurs in 

children aged 3-5 years.  



Causes: 

1. 


Postviral illness. In children, most cases of ITP are acute, and onset 

seems  to  occur  within  a  few  weeks  of  recovery  from  a  viral  illness. 

Thrombocytopenia  is  a  recognized  complication  following  Ebstein-Barr  virus 

infection;  varicella  virus;  cytomegalovirus;  rubella  virus;  hepatitis  A,  B  or  C;  or 

more  typically,  a  vaguely  defined,  viral,  upper  respiratory  infection  or 

gastroenteritis.  Transient  thrombocytopenia  often  follows  recent  immunization 

with attenuated live-virus vaccines. 

2. 


Human  immunodeficiency  virus  (HIV).  Thrombocytopenia  may 

occur  during  the  acute  retroviral  syndrome  coincident  with  fever,  rash,  and  sore 

throat.  

3. 


Drug-induced  thrombocytopenia.  Persons  who  have  been  sensitized 

(by  prior  exposure) to quinidine  or  quinine  may  develop  immune-mediated  drug 

purpura  within  hours  to  days  of  subsequent  exposure.  ther  drugs  that  have  been 

associated  with  drug  purpura  include  antibiotics  (eg,  cephalothins,  rifampicin), 

gold  salts,  analgesics,  neuroleptics,  diuretics,  antihypertensives,  eptifibatide 

(Integrilin),  and,  more  recently,  abciximab  (ReoPro),  a  chimeric  monoclonal 



fragment  antigen  binding  (Fab)  antibody  fragment  directed  against  the  platelet 

GPIIb/IIIa receptor. 



CLINICAL Physical:  

1. 


Skin and mucous membranes. The presence of widespread petechiae 

and  ecchymoses,  oozing  from  a  venepuncture  site,  gingival  bleeding,  or 

hemorrhagic  bullae  indicates  that  the  patient  is  at  risk  for  a  serious  bleeding 

complication (Fig. 1). If the patient's blood pressure was taken recently, petechiae 

may  be  observed  under  and  distal  to  the  area  where  the  cuff  was  placed  and 

inflated (Fig. 2). Similarly, suction-type ECG leads may induce petechiae. 

2. 

Abdomen.  The  spleen  is  palpable  in  less  than  10%  of  children  with 



ITP. In  children  with  acute  ITP, the  presence  of  a  readily  palpable  spleen  is  not 

typical.  



 

 

Fig. 1. Haemorrhagic rush in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fig. 2. “Cuff” symptrom in thrombocytopenic purpura. 

 

 



Fig. 3. Petechiae and purpura from immune thrombocytopenic purpura 

 

Lab Studies:  

Complete blood count. The hallmark of ITP is isolated thrombocytopenia. 

Peripheral blood smear 

1. 

The morphology of red cells and leukocytes is normal. 



2. 

The  morphology  of  platelets  is  typically  normal,  with  varying 

numbers of large platelets.  

3. 


Clumps  of  platelets  on  a  peripheral  smear  prepared  from 

ethylenediaminetetraacetic  acid  (EDTA)-anticoagulated  blood  are  evidence  of 

pseudothrombocytopenia.  

Antiplatelet  antibody.  Assays  for  platelet  antigen-specific  antibodies, 

platelet-associated  immunoglobulin,  or  other  antiplatelet  antibodies  are  available 

in some medical centers and certain mail-in reference laboratories. 



Imaging Studies:  

Computer-assisted  tomographic  (CT)  scanning  or  magnetic  resonance 

imaging  (MRI)  Use  them  promptly  when  the  medical  history  or  physical 

examination suggests serious internal bleeding. 



Procedures: The primary diagnostic evaluation is the bone marrow aspirate 

and biopsy. In ITP, a normal-to-increased number of megakaryocytes exist in the 

absence of other significant abnormalities. 

Spleen. No specific findings exist in the spleen.  



Medical Care:  

1. 


The  goal  of  medical  care  is  to  increase  the  platelet  count  to  a  safe 

level,  permitting  patients  with  ITP  to  live  normal  lives  while  awaiting 

spontaneous or treatment-induced remission. After 6 months, if the platelet count 

cannot be maintained at a safe level or it cannot be maintained at a safe level with 

medication without serious treatment-related toxicity, consider splenectomy.  

2. 


Corticosteroids  (oral  prednisone,  IV  methylprednisolone)  are  the 

drugs of choice for initial management of ITP.  

3. 

Intravenous  immune  globulin  (IVIG)  has  been  the  drug  of  second 



choice for many years. However, recent studies indicate that for patients who are 

Rh(D)  positive  with  ITP,  intravenous  Rho  immune  globulin  (RhIG)  offers 

comparable efficacy, less toxicity, greater ease of administration, and a lower cost 

than IVIG.  

4. 

The  limitation  of  using  IV  RhIG  is  the  lack  of  efficacy  in  patients 



who  are  Rh(D)  negative  or  splenectomized.  Also,  IV  RhIG  induces  immune 

hemolysis  in  persons  who  are  Rh(D)  positive  and  should  not  be  used  when  the 

hemoglobin concentration is less than 8.0 g/dL.  

Medical care in children  

1. 

The  initial  treatment  of  ITP  depends  on  whether  the  risk  of  severe 



hemorrhage,  such  as  intracranial  bleeding,  is  estimated  to  be  low,  moderate,  or 

high.  


2. 

Children  whose  platelet  count  is  greater  than  30,000/ L  typically 

only have mild purpura, and the risk of a severe hemorrhage is low. They may be 

managed as outpatients without specific treatment.  

3. 

Children whose platelet count is less than 20,000/ L may have more 



significant  purpura  and  mucosal  bleeding.  Oral  prednisone  is  conservative 

treatment,  and  the  addition  of  IV  RhIG  for  patients  who  are  Rh(D)  positive  or 

IVIG for patients who are Rh(D) negative is a more aggressive treatment.  

4. 

Children  whose  platelet  count  is  less  than  10,000/ L  are  likely  to 



have a significant bleeding tendency and a high risk of serious hemorrhage. Initial 

treatment with IV methylprednisolone and either IV RhIG or IVIG is appropriate.  

5. 

Platelet  transfusions  may  be  required  for  overt  bleeding  but  are  not 



recommended for prophylaxis. 

Chronic or treatment-resistant ITP 

1. 

For those patients whose platelet counts do not or no longer respond 



to  treatment  with  tolerable  doses  of  corticosteroids,  IV  RhIG,  IVIG,  or 

splenectomy, other treatments are available.  

2. 

Data supporting these options are based on relatively few case studies 



and response rates are comparatively lower.  

3. 


Before concluding that a patient has failed both medical management 

and  splenectomy,  necessitating  treatment  with  alternative  options,  perform  an 

imaging study to ensure that the problem is not associated with the presence of an 

accessory spleen.  

4. 

Among  the  medical  treatment  options  in  these  circumstances  are 



cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and danazol.  

5. 


Interventions  of  uncertain  efficacy  include  vinblastine,  vincristine, 

ascorbic  acid,  colchicine,  or  interferon-alpha,  for  which  conflicting  reports  of 

efficacy in the medical literature exist. 

Surgical  Care:  In  acute  ITP,  splenectomy  usually  results  in  a  rapid, 

complete,  and  lifelong  clinical  remission.  In  chronic  ITP,  the  results  of 

splenectomy typically are less predictable. Platelet counts may not revert to fully 

normal values, and relapses are not uncommon. Splenectomy results in a lifelong 

increased  risk  of  sepsis  from  infection  by  encapsulated  bacteria.  In  children,  the 

risk  of  bacterial  sepsis  after  splenectomy  is  estimated  to  be  1-2%.  Many 

pediatricians recommend delaying splenectomy until children are aged 5 years. 


MEDICATION Prednisone 4-8 mg/kg/d PO; however, a reduced dose of 

1.5-2.0  mg/kg/d  may  be  adequate  for  management  of  nonurgent  situations  or 

when  risk  of  adverse  effects  is  high  because  of  predisposing  factor,  such  as 

diabetes or psychiatric illness 



Methylprednisolone (Solu-Medrol) 30 mg/kg/d IV for initial management 

of a severe bleeding tendency in ITP. IV methylprednisolone recommended when 

most  rapid  and  reliable  treatment  of  ITP  is  required.  In  this  situation,  combine 

methylprednisolone with IV RhIG in qualified patients who are Rh(D) positive or 

IVIG  in  patients  who  are  Rh(D) negative or  unqualified patients  who  are  Rh(D) 

positive. 



Intravenous  Rho  immune  globulin  (WinRho  SDF)  --  Specialized 

immunoglobulin  product  manufactured  from  pools  of  plasma  from  persons  who 

are Rh(D) negative and have been alloimmunized to the D blood group antigen. A 

single  infusion  of  50  µg/kg,  followed  by  a  second  dose,  if  required,  of  20-40 

µg/kg,  is  recommended;  an  off-label  dose  of  75  µg/kg  in  patients  whose 

hemoglobin  concentration  is  at  least  8.0  g/dL  may  increase  efficacy  without 

adverse  effect  Not  recommended  for  persons  whose  Rh  blood  type  is  Rh(D)-

negative or who have had a splenectomy; IV RhIG should not be used for persons 

whose hemoglobin concentration is <8.0g/dL; persons with known IgA deficiency 

and  anti-IgA  are  at  risk  of  an  anaphylactic/anaphylactoid  reaction  to  all  plasma-

containing biologicals, including IV RhIG  

Immune  globulin  intravenous  (IVIG,  Gamimune,  Gammagard, 

Sandoglobulin)  Begin  with  1.0  g/kg  infused  IV  at  starting  rate  of  0.5  mL/kg/h 

(5% solution) to a maximum rate of 4.0 mL/kg/h; repeat dose at 3-4 wk intervals 

when indicated by decreasing platelet count 



Immunosuppressive  antimetabolite  --  Used  in  patients  with  ITP  to  reduce 

production  of  abnormal  autoantibody.  Azathioprine  (Imuran)  --  May  be 

effective  in  some  patients  with  ITP  who  do  not  or  no  longer  respond  to 

corticosteroids, IV RhIG, or IVIG. May be used in conjunction with prednisone to 



reduce dose of prednisone, or it may be used as another oral medication to delay 

splenectomy. Adult Dose 2 mg/kg/d PO/IV Pediatric Dose 50mg/daily 



Synthetic antineoplastic drugs (chemically related to nitrogen mustards) -- 

Inhibit  cell  growth  and  proliferation.  Cyclophosphamide  (Cytoxan)  --  May  be 

useful  in  some  patients  who  do  not  or  no  longer  respond  to  corticosteroids,  IV 

RhIG,  IVIG,  or  splenectomy.  Induces  less  of  a  decrease  in  platelet  count 

compared to other immunosuppressive alkylating agents. 2 mg/kg/d PO or 1.0-1.5 

g/m


2

 q2-4mo as a bolus IV infusion; occasionally, patients require more frequent 

dosing 

Prognosis:  More  than  80%  of  children  with  untreated  ITP  had  a 

spontaneous recovery with completely normal platelet counts in 2-8 weeks. Fatal 

bleeding occurred in 0.9% on initial presentation. Fatal intracerebral hemorrhage 

occurs rarely in children who have been treated with prednisone and IV RhIG or 

IVIG for at least 2 days. 

 

Thrombasthenia  Glanzmann  thromboasthenia,  Glanzmann  disease, 

constitutional thrombopathy, hereditary hemorrhagic thrombopathy 



Background: Glanzmann initially described thrombasthenia in 1918 when 

he  noted  purpuric  bleeding  in  patients  with  platelet  counts  within  the  reference 

range. Glanzmann thrombasthenia is one of several inherited disorders of platelet 

function.  

athophysiology: Glanzmann thrombasthenia is an autosomal recessive trait 

whereby the production and assembly of the platelet membrane glycoprotein (GP) 

IIb-IIIa  is  altered,  preventing  the  aggregation  of  platelets  and  subsequent  clot 

formation.  



Mortality/Morbidity:  The  probability  of  death  following  bleeding  is 

estimated at approximately 5%. ] 

Age:  Patients  with  Glanzmann  thrombasthenia  are  typically  diagnosed  in 

infancy; all individuals with the disorder are recognized by age 5 years.  



Physical: Most patients with thrombasthenia present with signs of purpura 

or bleeding. 

The  diagnosis  is  made  in  patients  with  refractory  hemorrhage  and 

appropriate findings on the diagnostic laboratory studies  



Causes: Trauma and pressure remain the most frequent causes of bleeding 

in persons with thrombasthenia. 



Lab Studies:  

1. 


A  history  of  prolonged  bleeding,  a  prolonged  bleeding  time,  and 

failure  of  platelets  to  aggregate  in  response  to  any  of  the  usual  agonists  are 

diagnostic of thrombasthenia. 

2. 


A  CBC  may  also  suggest  the  degree  of  bleeding.  Patients  who  are 

thrombasthenic  have  platelet  counts  within  the  reference  range  and,  on  blood 

smear, normal platelet morphology. 

3. 


Prothrombin  time  (PT)  and  activated  partial  thromboplastin  time 

(aPTT) are within reference ranges. 

4. 

A urinalysis may demonstrate proteinuria and microscopic hematuria. 



5. 

The  diagnosis  is  confirmed  by  documenting  the  absence  of  GP  IIb-

IIIa  via  sodium  dodecyl  sulfate-polyacrylamide  gel  electrophoresis  of 

radiolabeled platelet proteins. 



Medical Care:  

1. 


Refractory  bleeding  in  individuals  with  thrombasthenia  requires  the 

transfusion of normal platelets. 

2. 

E-aminocaproic  acid  may  be  useful  in  controlling  bleeding  after 



dental extraction.  

3. 


Corticosteroids are not helpful in persons with acute bleeding.  

4. 


Other  more  rare  therapies  cited  were  bone  marrow  transplants  and 

recombinant factor VIIa.  



Surgical  Care:  Patients  with  severe  menorrhagia  may  require 

hysterectomy. 



Vasculitis and Thrombophlebitis 

Vasculitis  is  a  descriptive  term  associated  with  a  heterogeneous  group  of 

diseases  that  results  in  inflammation  of  blood  vessels.  Arteries  and  veins  of  any 

size  in  any  organ  may  be  affected,  leading  to  ischemic  damage  to  organs.  The 

pattern  of  vessel  involvement  is  highly  variable,  leading  to  innumerable  clinical 

presentations. The most common vasculitides of childhood are Henoch-Schцnlein 

purpura  and  Kawasaki  disease.  See  articles  on  Kawasaki  Disease,  Infantile 

Polyarteritis Nodosa, Polyarteritis Nodosa, and Takayasu Arteritis.  

For  the  clinician,  diagnosing  the  cause  of  vasculitis  is  a  difficult  task  that 

involves  distinguishing  disease  entities  with  possibly  overlapping  clinical 

presentations.  Classification  criteria  have  been  established  for  a  number  of 

distinct  clinical  syndromes,  but  these  are  less  useful  in  making  a  diagnosis  in 

patients  who  do  not  meet  all  the  criteria  of  any  one  disease.  While  groups  of 

patients  with  unifying  features  can  be  identified,  a  patient  with  vasculitis  often 

presents  initially  with  nonspecific  constitutional  findings.  Various  classification 

schemes  for  vasculitis  have  been  proposed,  most  recently  by  an  international 

consensus conference in Chapel Hill, North Carolina in 1994. This classification 

is as follows:  

Large-sized vessel vasculitis  

1. 

Temporal  arteritis  -  Granulomatous  arteritis  of  the  aorta  and  major 



branches,  especially  the  extracranial  branches  of  the  carotid  artery  that  usually 

occurs in patients older than 50 years  

2. 

Takayasu  arteritis  -  Granulomatous  arteritis  of  the  aorta  and  major 



branches that usually occurs in patients younger than 50 years 

Medium-sized vessel vasculitis  

1. 

Polyarteritis  nodosa  -  Necrotizing  vasculitis  of  medium-  or  small-



sized  arteries  without  involvement  of  large  arteries,  veins,  or  venules;  renal 

involvement without glomerulonephritis  

2. 

Kawasaki  disease  -  Medium-  and  small-sized  arteritis  of  childhood 



associated  with  mucocutaneous  lymph  node  syndrome;  most  commonly  affects 

coronary arteries, although veins and aorta may be involved (Lesions of the aorta 

have been found on autopsy.) 

Small-sized vessel vasculitis  

1. 


Wegener granulomatosis - Granulomatous inflammation of small- to 

medium-sized 

vessels 

involving 

the 

respiratory 



tract; 

necrotizing 

glomerulonephritis common  

2. 


Churg-Strauss  syndrome  -  Eosinophil-rich  and  granulomatous 

inflammation involving the respiratory tract and necrotizing vasculitis of small- to 

medium-sized  vessels;  associated  with  asthma  and  eosinophilia  (Under  the 

classification  of  the  American  College  of  Rheumatology  and  traditional 

classifications, Wegener granulomatosis and Churg-Strauss syndrome are grouped 

together with polyarteritis nodosa under medium-sized vessel vasculitis.)  

3. 

Microscopic  polyangiitis  (MPA)  -  Pauci-immune  necrotizing 



vasculitis 

involving 

small- 

and 


medium-sized 

vessels; 

necrotizing 

glomerulonephritis common; pulmonary capillaritis frequent  

4. 

Schönlein-Henoch 



disease: 

Small-vessel 

vasculitis 

with 


immunoglobulin  A  (IgA)  immune  accumulation;  involvement  of  skin,  gut,  and 

glomeruli typical; associated with arthritis or arthralgia  

5. 

Essential  cryoglobulinemic  vasculitis  -  Vasculitis  with  cryoglobulin 



immune  accumulation  affecting  arterioles  and  venules;  associated  with  serum 

cryoglobulins; skin and glomeruli often involved  

6. 

Cutaneous  leukocytoclastic  vasculitis  -  Isolated  cutaneous  vasculitis 



without systemic vasculitis or glomerulonephritis  

7. 


Possible  thrombophlebitis,  or  superficial  venous  thrombosis  - 

Resulting  from  vasculitic  lesions  with  endothelial  activation;  in  children,  more 

often due to hypercoagulable states or catheter instrumentation 

 

Background 

Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), also known as primary immune 

thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura, is defined 



as isolated thrombocytopenia with normal bone marrow and the absence of other 

causes of thrombocytopenia. The 2 distinct clinical syndromes manifest as an acute 

condition in children and a chronic condition in adults.  

ITP is a decrease in the number of circulating platelets in the absence of toxic 

exposure or a disease associated with a low platelet count.  

Pathophysiology 

ITP is primarily a disease of increased peripheral platelet destruction, with most 

patients having antibodies to specific platelet membrane glycoproteins. Relative 

marrow failure may contribute to this condition, since studies show that most 

patients have either normal or diminished platelet production.  

Acute ITP often follows an acute infection and has a spontaneous resolution within 

2 months. Chronic ITP persists longer than 6 months without a specific cause.  

Epidemiology 


Yüklə 1,02 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə