From mutations to disease mechanism in rett syndrome, breast cancer, and congenital hypothyroidism



Yüklə 4,8 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə9/13
tarix05.05.2017
ölçüsü4,8 Kb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13

male control 
0.51 ±0.05 
0.49 ±0.09 
0.46 ±0.09 
female control 
0.99 ±0.07 
1.01 ±0.08 
1.02 ±0.09 
 
 
 
 
R1   (male) 
0.53 
0.63 

R21 (male) 
0.51 
0.53 

R37 (male) 
0.53 
0.53 

R5 
0.50 
0.54 
0.50 
R23 
0.46 
1.04 
0.51 
R30 
0.95 
0.63 
1.18 
 
 
 
 
R7 
0.98 
1.06 
0.95 
R10 
0.88 
1.09 
1.10 
R11 
1.00 
1.14 
0.80 
R12 
0.87 
1.05 
1.04 
R26 
1.02 
1.02 
1.05 
R32 
0.91 
1.02 
0.95 
R35 
1.10 
1.13 
0.81 
R40 
0.77 
0.76 
0.96 
R41 
0.87 
0.95 
0.93 
R43 
0.85 
0.96 
1.08 
R44 
0.85 
0.8 
0.92 
R45 
1.00 
0.95 
0.88 
R48 
1.00 
0.94 
1.00 
R50 
0.83 
0.83 
1.00 
 
 
 
 
R14 
1.44 
1.35 
1.40 
R19 
1.85 
1.62 
1.74 
R20 
1.41 
1.38 
1.40 
R33 
1.45 
1.33 
0.98 
 
 

 
82 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 5.6.  The plots of quantitative Real Time PCR and QF-PCR analyses results.  
 

 
83 
 
(a) 
 
 
(b) 
 
 
(c) 
 
Figure 5.7.  A representative QF-PCR analysis for a healthy female (a), R5 with exon 3 
deletion (b), and R19 with exon 3 duplication (c), respectively. 
 

 
84 
 
Figure 5.8.  QF-PCR analysis of patient R33. 
  
5.1.4.  X Chromosome Inactivation Status  
 
X chromosome inactivation analysis was performed for 44 female patients; however, 
the status of six patients (13.6 per cent) could not be identified because of homozygousity 
for both AR and ZNF261 loci. X-inactivation was random in 23 (61.5 per cent) and skewed 
in 15 (39.5 per cent) of 38 informative patients (Table 5.1). The paternal X chromosome 
was active in one patient and eight patients showed preferential activation of the maternal 
X  chromosome.  The  origin  of  the  active  allele  could  not  be  determined  in  six  patients 
because of unavailability of the maternal sample. A representative XCI analysis of patients 
with skewed, random, and non-informative XCI status is shown in Figure 5.9.     
 
 
(+)                                (+) 
(a) 
 
(+)                            (+) 
(b) 
 
(+)                              (+) 
(c) 
Figure 5.9.  X chromosome inactivation analysis of patients with skewed (a), random (b), 
and non-informative (c) XCI pattern, respectively. (+) represents the PCR products from 
HhaI digested DNA. 
 

 
85 
5.1.5.  Genotype–Phenotype Correlations 
 
The  clinical  severity  scores  of  the  patients  were  given  in  Table  5.1.  High  scores 
(maximum  score  9)  indicate  more  severe  disease  phenotype.  A  statistically  significant 
correlation  could  not  be  identified  between  the  mean  severity  score  of  patients  and  the 
presence,  type  and  location  of  mutation,  and  the  XCI  pattern  (Table  5.3).  However,  the 
patients  with  exon  deletions  were  found  to  have  higher  clinical  severity  scores  than  all 
other mutation-positive patients (8.33±0.58 vs 6.70±1.57, p=0.066). When site of mutation 
is  considered  alone,  we  observed  that  the  patients  with  affected  TRD  domain  had  more 
severe  phenotype  than  the  patients  with  affected  MBD  domain  (7.80±1.23  vs  6.88±1.64, 
respectively).  Mutation  negative  patients  and  patients  with  skewed  XCI  patterns  had 
slightly milder phenotypes when compared to mutation positive patients and patients with 
random XCI, respectively. 
 
When  we  performed  statistical  analysis  of  severity  scores  for  specific  clinical 
features,  we  obtained  a  significant  difference  in  the  fields  of  ‘‘gait  function’’  and  “eye 
contact”.  None  of  the  patients  with  MECP2  exon  deletions  have  ever  walked  (p=0.019). 
Eye contact is very difficult to obtain in patients with exon duplications when compared to 
that  of  patients  with  missense  mutation  (p=0.016).  Although  the  differences  were  not 
significant,  mutation  positive  patients  had  severe  problems  in  their  ability  in  purposeful 
hand movement and walking skills when compared to mutation negative patients.
    
   
 
5.1.6. Prenatal Diagnosis 
 
Upon  request,  prenatal  diagnosis  was  performed  in  the  families  of  the  patient  R29 
with p.T158M, patient R42 with p.L386Hdel12, and patient R69 with p.R255X mutations. 
Chorionic  biopsy  specimens  were  tested  and  found  to  be  negative  for  index  patient’s 
mutation (Figure 5.10). 
 
 
 
 
 

 
86 
 
    (a) 
 
 
    (b) 
 
 
    (c) 
 
Figure 5.10.  Agarose gel electrophoresis showing the prenatal diagnosis performed in the 
families of the patient R29 with p.T158M (a), patient R42 with p.L386Hdel12 (b), and 
patient R69 with p.R255X mutations (c). 

 
87 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Table 5.3.  Mean Phenotypic Severity Scores of female patients of first group. 
 
       * (P=0.016); **(p=0.019); *** (p=0.066) 
 
 

 
88 
5.1.7.    Multiplexed  ARMS-PCR  Approach  for  the  Detection  of  Common  MECP2 
Mutations 
 
In  the  present  study,  we  have  established  a  multiplex  multiplex  amplification 
refractory  mutation  system  (ARMS)  -  PCR  assay  to  detect  the  seven  common  MECP2 
mutations  p.R106W,  p.R133C,  p.T158M,  p.R168X,  p.R255X,  p.R270X,  p.R294X,  and 
p.R306C. Each primer set was tested and optimized using mutation positive DNA samples, 
and then multiplexed (Figure 5.11). A representative multiplex ARMS-PCR assay analysis 
is shown in Figure 5.12. 
 
5.1.7.1.    Assay  optimization.  Several  factors,  including  the  concentration  of  primers, 
MgCl

and  Taq  polymerase,  and  PCR  cycling  conditions  that  can  affect  PCR  specificity 
and efficiency were optimized. The concentration of Taq polymerase and MgCl
2
 both had 
pronounced  effects  on  the  specificity  and  relative  yield  of  the  PCR  products.  Although 
high MgCl
2
 concentration increased the intensity of our desired bands, it resulted in non-
specific backgrounds. The optimum amount of MgCl
2
 was found to be 2.5 mM to ensure 
specificity of the multiplex PCR assay. A range of Taq polymerase concentration was also 
tested  and  PCR  specificity  was  found  to  be  highest  with  1.5  U  of  Taq  Polymerase.  To 
improve the specificity and the sensitivity of the amplification, we have used a touchdown 
PCR  strategy  with  stepwise  decrease  of  the  annealing  temperature  from  63  to  59  C. 
Different concentrations for each set of primers were tested until maximum sensitivity and 
specificity were obtained (Table 4.3). 
 
5.1.7.2.  Validation of the assay. To evaluate the assay, we tested 14 patients with RTT for 
whom  we  had  previously  determined  the  genotypes  by  PCR  followed  by  restriction 
enzyme  digestion  or  DNA  sequencing.  We  observed  complete  concordance  between  the 
traditional and Multiplex-ARMS methods (Figure 5.13).         
 

 
89 
 
Figure 5.11.  Agarose gel electrophoresis of the multiplex ARMS PCR assay products. 
Each mutant ARMS primer was evaluated with corresponding mutation positive DNA 
samples. Lane 1-8: Allele specific amplification of mutations p.R106W, p.R133C, 
p.T158M, p.R168X, p.R255X, p.R270X, p.R294X, and p.R306C, respectively. Lane 9: 
100 bp DNA ladder (MBI Fermentas). An aliquot of 10 µl of each PCR product was 
loaded onto the gel. 
 
 
 
Figure 5.12.  A representative multiplex ARMS-PCR assay analysis. Lane 1: PCR with 
wild-type primers of Panel 1; Lane 2-5: PCR with mutant primers of Panel 1 using samples 
with p.R294X, p.R255X, p.R168X, and p.R133C mutations, respectively; Lane 6: PCR 
with wild-type primers of Panel 2; Lane 7-9: PCR with mutant primers of Panel 2 using 
samples with mutations p.R306C, p.R270X, and p.T158M, respectively. An aliquot of 15 
µl of each PCR product was loaded on the gel. 
 

 
90 
 
 
Figure 5.13.  Evaluation of the multiplexed ARMS-PCR assay using RTT patient samples 
with known mutations. (a) Panel 1. Lane 1: PCR with wild type primers; Lane 2: patient 
with p.R294X; Lane 3-7: patients with p.R255X; Lane 8-9: patients with p.R168X; Lane 
10: patient with p.R133C. (b) Panel 2. Lane 1: PCR with wild type primers; Lane 2: patient 
with p.R306C; Lane 3: patient with p.R270X; Lane 4-6: patients with p.T158M; Lane 7-
10: Analysis of patients with p.R106W using ARMS assay. An aliquot of 15 µl of each 
PCR product was loaded onto the gel. 
 
 
5.1.8.  The Effect of DNA Concentration on Reliability and Reproducibility of SYBR 
Green Dye-based Real Time PCR Analysis to Detect the Exon Rearrangements 
 
In  this  part  of  the  study,  we  have  investigated  the  effect  of  DNA  concentration  on 
reliability and reproducibility of Real Time PCR to detect the exon rearrangements. SYBR 
(a) 
(b) 

 
91 
Green  dye-based  Real  Time  PCR  analysis  was  performed  to  detect  the  MECP2  exon  3 
rearrangements in five samples with previously determined genotypes.  
        
Through  optimization  of  reaction  conditions,  the  optimal  concentration  of  primers 
was found to be 5 and 10 pmol for NDRG1 (reference gene) and MECP2, respectively. The 
melting  curves  of  the  all  PCR  products  showed  a  single  peak  with  identical  melting 
temperature (Tm), indicating that there was no non-specific amplification. The specificity 
of the real-time PCR was further confirmed by analysis of the PCR products on an agarose 
gel which showed the expected amplification products of 172 and 175-bp for MECP2 exon 
3 and NDRG1, respectively. 
 
5.1.8.1.    Comparison  of  Quantification  Methods.  Two  methods  for  determination  of  the 
MECP2
 exon 3 copy numbers from the raw data of Real-Time PCR reaction are available. 
The relative kinetic method is based on interpolated data from a standard curve, whereas 
the comparative Ct method transforms a difference in Ct values (between the test sample 
and the calibrator sample) into a copy number ratio. The relative kinetic method takes in 
account the actual efficiency of the reaction. The comparative Ct method does not require 
standard curves and 0.95 was used as default amplification efficiency in quantification. For 
all samples the MECP2 exon 3 copy number was calculated using both methods. A paired 
sample t-test showed that the obtained results by both methods were significantly similar 
(P = 0.451>0.05). In addition, the Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.996 (P = 1E-6 <0.01) 
demonstrated the equivalence of both methods. 
 
5.1.8.2.    Quantification.  Using  the  control  DNA  samples  (20  ng)  for  whom  we  had 
previously  determined  the  genotypes,  the  mean  ratios  were  observed  as  0.52±0.12  for 
deletion  carriers  (expected  value:  0.5)  and  1.56±0.18  for  duplication  carriers  (expected 
value: 1.5) vs. 1.022±0.17 for non-carriers (expected value: 1.0). The differences between 
the three groups were highly significant (p<0.001) (ANOVA). 
 
Triplicate measurements were performed on six DNA concentrations of 0.1, 1, 5, 50, 
100, and 200 ng of the patient R23 with MECP2 exon 3 deletion, patient R19 with MECP2 
exon 3 duplication, and two healthy females and one male (Table 5.4). The expected copy 
number ratio was obtained in all cases when 1 ng, 5 ng, and 50 ng DNA used. However, 

 
92 
using 0.1 ng DNA, the ratio was out of expected range (± 2SD) in six of 15 measurements 
resulting  in  misgenotyping  for  R5,  R19  and  female  2  samples.  In  case  of  100  ng  DNA, 
expected ratio could not be obtained in four of 15 measurements leading to misgenotyping 
of  R19  and  two  female  samples.  We  did  not  get  any  expected  copy  number  while  using 
200 ng DNA (Figure 5.14).   
 
The  effect  of  the  DNA  concentration  on  the  amplification  efficiency  and  specifity 
could be observed in amplification curve and melting curve analysis. Use of the high DNA 
concentrations (100–200 ng) resulted in inhibition of the amplification and/or nonspecific 
product formation in some cases (Figure 5.15 and 5.16).     
 
Table 5.4.  Ct values obtained from Real Time PCR analysis on different amounts of DNA. 
 
Sample 
DNA 
conc. 
Ct of 
MeCP2 
Ct of 
NDRG1 
ratio of 
MeCP2/NDRG1 gene 
35.00 
32.64 
1.20 
37.00 
37.00 
1.15 
0.1 ng 
27.76 
26.67 
1.00 
32.50 
30.37 
1.11 
30.60 
29.76 
0.89 
1 ng 
31.82 
31.58 
0.97 
29.61 
27.84 
1.06 
28.16 
27.50 
1.17 
5 ng 
25.70 
24.98 
1.00 
26.38 
25.00 
1.00 
26.21 
25.79 
0.95 
50 ng 
26.21 
25.93 
0.95 
24.88 
23.26 
0.80 
26.05 
23.98 
0.27 
100 ng 
26.17 
24.98 
0.87 
23.95 
21.83 
0.58 
25.60 
23.06 
0.20 
Female 1 
200 ng 
21.50 
21.62 
1.42 
 
 
 
 

 
93 
 
Table 5.4.  Ct values obtained from Real Time PCR analysis on different amounts of DNA 
(continued). 
Sample 
DNA 
conc. 
Ct of 
MeCP2 
Ct of 
NDRG1 
ratio of 
MeCP2/NDRG1 gene 
35.00 
35.00 
4.74 
38.00 
38.00 
1.09 
0.1 ng 
31.68 
31.21 
0.83 
32.55 
30.13 
0.89 
30.79 
29.93 
0.97 
1 ng 
32.66 
32.27 
0.83 
30.25 
27.98 
0.98 
29.33 
28.85 
0.82 
5 ng 
28.33 
28.90 
1.21 
27.57 
25.32 
1.00 
26.88 
26.55 
0.86 
50 ng 
26.94 
25.53 
1.20 
28.11 
24.26 
0.33 
26.30 
24.65 
0.35 
100 ng 
26.14 
25.06 
0.93 
28.42 
23.53 
0.16 
Female 2 
200 ng 
28.74 
23.14 
0.10 
32.28 
30.90 
0.45 
32.21 
30.08 
0.29 
0.1 ng 
35.00 
35.00 
0.27 
31.01 
28.92 
0.50 
30.96 
29.24 
0.62 
1 ng 
28.35 
26.93 
0.66 
29.54 
27.69 
0.46 
29.89 
27.65 
0.34 
5 ng 
30.15 
29.49 
0.43 
27.71 
26.52 
0.49 
28.66 
25.98 
0.50 
50 ng 
29.12 
26.09 
0.39 
27.33 
25.18 
0.49 
27.1 
24.69 
0.42 
100 ng 
28.13 
25.64 
0.22 
Male 
 
200 ng 
28.49 
24.25 
0.08 

 
94 
 
Table 5.4.  Ct values obtained from Real Time PCR analysis on different amounts of DNA 
(continued). 
 
Sample 
DNA 
conc. 
Ct of 
MeCP2 
Ct of 
NDRG1 
ratio of 
MeCP2/NDRG1 gene 
37.00 
37.00 
1.98 
37.00 
35.27 
0.51 
0.1 ng 
37.00 
37.00 
1.98 
31.50 
29.24 
0.47 
31.10 
29.24 
0.44 
1 ng 
29.92 
27.83 
0.37 
30.27 
27.92 
0.30 
29.78 
27.49 
0.32 
5 ng 
28.14 
26.81 
0.53 
27.71 
26.52 
0.49 
28.66 
25.98 
0.50 
50 ng 
29.12 
26.09 
0.39 
26.59 
24.82 
0.48 
27.66 
25.98 
0.51 
100 ng 
27.98 
26.65 
0.55 
Patient R5 
with exon 3 
deletion 
 
200 ng 
30.57 
22.28 
0.03 
35.00 
35.00 
1.06 
29.21 
29.48 
1.82 
0.1 ng 
30.95 
30.79 
1.10 
31.87 
32.55 
1.70 
30.61 
30.51 
1.46 
1 ng 
30.20 
30.19 
1.68 
27.90 
27.55 
1.39 
5 ng 
29.11 
29.62 
1.52 
27.17 
27.38 
1.51 
50 ng 
27.53 
27.98 
1.31 
28.22 
25.56 
0.17 
26.17 
25.85 
1.42 
100 ng 
26.22 
25.84 
1.38 
Patient R19 
with exon 3 
duplication 
200 ng 
28.47 
24.87 
0.09 
 
 
 
 

 
95 
 
Figure 5.14.  The summary of the Real Time analysis of MECP2 exon 3 rearrangements 
using 0.1 – 200 ng DNA. Gray shaded boxes indicate the results in out of range. 
    
 
Figure 5.15.  The profile of the amplification products of sample R5 with different 
concentrations of template DNA. Arrows show the unexpected amplification curves. 
 
 
Figure 5.16.  Melting curve analysis for PCR products of sample R5 using 0.1, 10, 50, 200 
ng DNA. The line shows the expected Tm value for MECP2 exon 3 products. 

 
96 
5.2.  Methylation Analyses of the Putative Promoter Region of Rad23 Genes in Breast 
Tumor Tissues 
 
In this study, the methylation status of 5’ flanking regions (including the CpG islands 
and  putative  promoter  sequence)  of  hHR23A  and  hHR23B  genes  was  investigated  in 
primary breast tumor, tumor adjacent tissues, and normal breast tissues.   
   
5.2.1.  Characterization of the 5' flanking region of the hHR23 Genes 
 
5.2.1.1.    hHR23A  Gene.  A  part  of  5’  flanking  region  (1450-bp  upstream  and  180-bp 
downstream  sequence,  relative  to  the  translation  start  site  (+1  ATG))  of  hHR23A  gene 
(GenBank accession NT_011295.10) was analyzed to predict the putative eukaryotic Pol II 
promoter.  Web-based  MethPrimer  software  revealed  two  CpG  islands  in  the  upstream 
region  (Figure  5.17).  The  first  CpG  island  was  127  bp  long  and  between  nucleotide  (nt) 
positions -580 and -454.. A 287 bp long second island is located between nucleotides -341 
and -55. PROSCAN program predicted a putative eukaryotic Pol II promoter region within 
the  second  CpG  island  (position  -48  to  -298  nts)  with  a  score of  98.79  (Promoter Cutoff 
score  =  53.000000).  The  promoter  region  lacks  the  CCAAT  and  TATA-like  elements,  a 
common feature of the house-keeping genes. The analysis revealed potential binding sites 
for the transcription factor Sp1 (-243/-231 and -233/-241 nts) as inverted overlapping sites, 
overlapping  ATF  and  CREB  sites  (-303/-294  nts),  and  an  Elk-1  site  (-113/-99  nts).  The 
primers were designed to investigate the methylation status of CpG di-nucleotides within 
the  -310/+140  nts,  a  region  covering  the  putative  promoter  sequence  and  59  CpG  di-
nucleotides.  
 
5.2.1.2.  hHR23B Gene. Peng et al. (2005) has shown that the CpG di-nucleotides in the 
upstream  region  (from  -338  to  -64  nts,  relative  to  the  transcription  start  site)  of  the 
hHR23B  gene  (GenBank  accession  NW_924539)  were  methylated  in  Interleukin-6-
responsive Multiple Myeloma KAS-6/1 cell lines. This region was analyzed to characterize 
the putative promoter sequence. PROSCAN software revealed a CCAAT and TATA- box 
lacking putative Pol II promoter sequence in between nucleotide positions -14 to -264 with 
a  score  of  217.35  (Promoter  Cutoff  score  =  53.000000).  Four  Sp1  binding  sites  were 
identified in positions -286/-279, -270/-261, -134/-127, and -118/-110. Using MethPrimer, 

 
97 
the  primers  were  designed  to  cover  the  putative  promoter  region  and  40  CpG  di-
nucleotides between nucleotides -328 to -19 (Figure 5.18). 
 
 
Figure 5.17.  MethPrimer program output showing the CpG islands and the investigated 
region at 5’ of the hHR23A gene. 
          
 
 
Figure 5.18.  MethPrimer program output showing the CpG island and the investigated 
sequence in 5’ flanking region of hHR23B gene. 
 
5.2.2.  Bisulfite Sequencing of hHR23A and hHR23B in paraffin-embedded tissues    
 
Sixty-one  archival  formalin-fixed,  paraffin-embedded  tissues  consisting  of  50 
primary  breast  tumors  (diagnosed  as  Invasive  Ductal  Carcinoma),  nine  tumor  adjacent 
tissues  and  four  normal  breast  tissues  were  included  in  this  study  (Table  5.5).  Genomic 
DNA  was  extracted  from  tissues  by  using  a  modified  version  of  non-heating  DNA 
extraction protocol described by Shi et al. (2002). Tissues were incubated with lysis buffer 
at 50 ºC for 48-72 hours instead of overnight at 45 ºC recommended by Shi et al. (2002). 

 
98 
DNA  isolation  was  successful  in  all  samples  with  concentrations  ranging  from  3  to  470 
ng/µl (Figure 5.19).   
 
The methylation status of the CpG islands was investigated by bisulfite-sequencing 
method.  Semi-nested  PCR  strategy  was  used  to  amplify  the  bisulfite  modified  DNA 
samples.  PCR  fragments  could  be  produced  in  38  samples  for  hHR23A  gene  and  58 
samples  for  hHR23B  gene  out  of  61  samples  tested.  The  methylation  status  of  hHR23A 
and hHR23B genes could be determined in 35 of 38 and 51 of 58 samples, respectively.  
 
 
Figure 5.19.   Agarose gel electrophoresis showing the quality of the genomic DNAs 
isolated from paraffin embedded tissues. Lane 1: 100-bp DNA ladder (MBI Fermentas); 
Lane 2 and 3: DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples, Lane 4-6: DNA isolated from 
paraffin embedded tissues, Lane 7 and 8: bisulfite treated DNA samples, Lane 9: 1-kb 
DNA ladder (MBI Fermentas). Approximately 200-400 ng DNA was loaded onto the slots.      
   
5.2.2.1.    hHR23A.  Methylation  analysis  of  5’  flanking  region  of  hHR23A  gene  revealed 
cytosine methylation in 12 tumor and 2 tumor adjacent tissues. The results are summarized 
in  Table  5.5  and  Figure  5.20.  Hypermethylation  was  observed  in  four  tumors  (from 
patients Rad21, 27T, 31T, and 32T) and one tumor adjacent tissue sample (Rad31N). The 
region  between  nucleotide  positions  +6/+117  was  hypermethylated  in  tumor  adjacent 
tissue  Rad31N  whereas  hypermethylation  spread  to  the  region  between  -249/+117  nts  in 
tumor tissue of the same sample (Rad31T) (Figure 5.21 and 5.22). Patient Rad29 has CpC 
methylation  at  position  -114/-113  in  tumor  adjacent  tissue  (Rad29N)  whereas  CpT  and 
CpA  di-nucleotides  were  methylated  at  positions  -133/-132  and  +11/+12  in  the  tumor 
tissue (Rad29T). Seven patients (Rad4, 6, 15, 29T, 29N, 33T, and 48) have only non-CpG 
methylation. Bisulfite sequencing revealed no methylation in 21 tissue samples.   

 
99 
Table 5.5.  Methylation analysis results for the 5’ flanking region of hHR23A.  
Yüklə 4,8 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə