Port Taranaki Economic Impact November 2012



Yüklə 446,05 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/4
tarix14.04.2017
ölçüsü446,05 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

Final Report 

 



Port Taranaki Economic Impact 

November 2012 



1. 

Summary

 

This report was commissioned by the Taranaki Regional Council to provide evidence of the Port

’s

 value to the 



Taranaki region. 

The key findings of the report are: 

 

Effective sea ports are crucial for the growth of an export focused New Zealand economy as over 99 



percent of New Zealand exports and imports by volume go through ports.  Port Taranaki is the third 

largest export port by volume behind Tauranga and Lyttleton, and is the sixth largest exporter by value, 

behind Tauranga, Auckland, Lyttleton, Napier and Dunedin. 

 



Port Taranaki plays an important role in the Taranaki region, particularly as the region is relatively isolated 

and industry is largely export focused.  Port Taranaki supports exporters and importers, reducing cost and 

improving access and options.  It also acts as an attractor of export focused, port dependant or transport 

related businesses.   

 

In relation to quantifiable economic impacts (total impact): 



o

 

Port operation contributes $25.5 million to regional GDP and employs 138 FTEs. 



o

 

Port dependent activity contributes $465 million to regional GDP and employs 1,270 FTEs. 



o

 

Industries that utilise the Port collectively contribute $2.5 billion to regional GDP and employ 



11,700 FTEs. 

 



Port Taranaki also plays an important role in place-shaping, particularly as the region has developed 

around the port.  The urban environment and transport links are tied to Port Taranaki, meaning it has a 

key role in shaping and defining the urban form of New Plymouth. 

 



Being owned by Taranaki Regional Council, the Port has a strong corporate citizenship role and provides 

an annual dividend to the Council, which supports lower rates. 

 

Looking ahead, the Port will continue to play a valuable role in generating economic activity and in 



supporting and enabling industry growth, particularly around the oil and gas sector and primary industries. 

 



The port can also play an increasingly important role in encouraging and enabling regional economic 

development through corporate citizenship and place-shaping initiatives. 

 

 


Final Report 

 



Port Taranaki Economic Impact 

November 2012 



The Economic Impact of Port Taranaki 

 

1.

 

Summary .......................................................................................... 3

 

2.

 

Introduction ...................................................................................... 6

 

3.

 

Ports as a strategic regional asset ................................................. 8

 

3.1


 

Regional role .................................................................................................................... 8

 

3.2


 

National role ..................................................................................................................... 9

 

4.

 

Port Taranaki .................................................................................. 11

 

4.1


 

Background .................................................................................................................... 11

 

4.2


 

Regional context............................................................................................................. 11

 

4.3


 

Port Taranaki throughput volumes .................................................................................. 12

 

4.4


 

Port Taranaki throughput values ..................................................................................... 15

 

4.5


 

Major industries .............................................................................................................. 18

 

5.

 

Port Taranaki Quantifiable Economic Impact .............................. 19

 

5.1


 

Port operations ............................................................................................................... 19

 

5.2


 

Port-related business activity .......................................................................................... 19

 

5.3


 

Port-related sub-groups .................................................................................................. 20

 

5.4


 

Summary ........................................................................................................................ 22

 

6.

 

Port Taranaki Associated Activity ................................................ 23

 

6.1


 

Total impact of associated activities................................................................................ 23

 

6.2


 

Oil and gas ..................................................................................................................... 24

 

6.3


 

Chemicals and metal product manufacturing .................................................................. 28

 

6.4


 

Transport and storage .................................................................................................... 29

 

6.5


 

Primary production and food processing ......................................................................... 30

 

7.

 

Other Port Benefits ........................................................................ 35

 

7.1


 

Corporate citizen ............................................................................................................ 35

 

7.2


 

Regional rates relief and economic development outcomes ........................................... 37

 

7.3


 

Economic development opportunities ............................................................................. 37

 

8.  Appendix ........................................................................................ 40

 

8.1


 

Approach to valuing the economic impact of Port Taranaki ............................................. 40

 

8.2


 

EIA comparisons ............................................................................................................ 46

 

8.3


 

Port trends...................................................................................................................... 48

 

 

 



Final Report 

 



Port Taranaki Economic Impact 

November 2012 



Tables 

Table 4.1.  Overseas Cargo for year ended March 2012 ................................................................ 12

 

Table 4.2.  Exports by value, 2012 ................................................................................................. 16



 

Table 4.3.  Imports by value, 2012 ................................................................................................. 17

 

Table 4.4.  Port Taranaki coastal trade key industries by value ...................................................... 17



 

Table 5.1.  Port expenditure ........................................................................................................... 19

 

Table 5.2.  Port impacts ................................................................................................................. 19



 

Table 5.3.  Port-dependent activity ................................................................................................. 20

 

Table 5.4.  Impact on port services and agents .............................................................................. 20



 

Table 5.5.  Impact on the transport and storage industry ................................................................ 21

 

Table 5.6.  Impact on the fishing and seafood processing industry ................................................. 21



 

Table 5.7.  Boatbuilding industry economic impact ......................................................................... 22

 

Table 5.8.  Economic Impact of Port Taranaki ................................................................................ 22



 

Table 6.1.  Port Taranaki associated activity .................................................................................. 23

 

Table 6.2.  Summary of oil and gas industry, 2012 ......................................................................... 25



 

Table 6.3.  Impact of the oil and gas industry on Taranaki Region economy, 2011 ......................... 25

 

Table 6.4.  Oil and gas companies related to Port Taranaki ........................................................... 26



 

Table 6.5.  Chemical and metal product manufacturing industry summary ..................................... 28

 

Table 6.6.  Chemical and metal product manufacturing economic impact ...................................... 28



 

Table 6.7.  Transport and storage industry summary, 2011 ............................................................ 29

 

Table 6.8.  Transport and storage industry economic impact .......................................................... 29



 

Table 6.9.  Primary sector summary indicators, 2011 ..................................................................... 30

 

Table 6.10.  Primary sector economic impact ................................................................................. 31



 

Table 6.11.  Dairy processing industry summary ............................................................................ 32

 

Table 6.12.  Dairy processing economic impact ............................................................................. 32



 

Table 6.13.  Meat processing industry summary ............................................................................ 33

 

Table 6.14.  Meat processing economic impact .............................................................................. 33



 

Table 6.15.  Meat processing and related companies..................................................................... 34

 

Table 8.1.  Port-related companies ................................................................................................ 41



 

Table 8.2.  Comparison with earlier Port EIAs ................................................................................ 46

 

Table 8.3.  Comparison of EIA with Port of Tauranga and Ports of Auckland ................................. 47



 

 

Figures 

Figure 4.1.  Volume of product throughput, 2011 ............................................................................ 13

 

Figure 4.2.  Volumes by transport type ........................................................................................... 14



 

Figure 4.3.  Port Taranaki container volumes ................................................................................. 15

 

Figure 4.4.  Port Taranaki trade type by volume ............................................................................. 15



 

Figure 7.1.  Port Taranaki sponsorship ........................................................................................... 35

 

Figure 7.2.  Port Taranaki dividends ............................................................................................... 37



 

Figure 8.1.  Port Taranaki employees ............................................................................................. 48

 

Figure 8.2.  Port Taranaki revenue ................................................................................................. 48



 

Figure 8.3.  Port Taranaki operational expenditure ......................................................................... 49

 

Figure 8.4.  Port Taranaki capital expenditure ................................................................................ 49



 

2. 

Introduction

 

This report has been commissioned by Taranaki Regional Council to quantify 

Port Taranaki’s 

contribution to the 

Taranaki economy and to identify and present its strategic value to the economic development of the region. 

It updates an earlier (2007) report on the Economic Impact of Port Taranaki, which was commissioned by Venture 

Taranaki. 

Port Taranaki is a key strategic asset for the Taranaki region.  It is a major export port in New Zealand and supports 

export industries including oil and gas, petrochemicals, logging and food processing.  This report determines the 

economic impact of port activity on the region.  It identifies economic activity through port operations and port 

related businesses.  It looks at the contribution of industries in the Taranaki that use port services.  It also looks at 

the value of the Port in relation to its role as an infrastructure provider and corporate citizen. 



Format 

This report is split into eight chapters.  The first two chapters provide a summary and introduce the report. 

Chapter 3 looks at the strategic role of the port in relation to economic growth and development at a national and a 

regional level. 

Chapter 4 looks at the history and current activity of Port Taranaki. 

Chapter 5 determines the quantifiable economic impact of Port Taranaki, in terms of its own business activity and 

port dependent businesses.  These include port operations, port services and agents, transport and storage, fishing 

and seafood processing and boatbuilding. 

Chapter 6 looks at the value of industries that use Port Taranaki, and explores the positive relationship between the 

Port and those industries.  These include oil and gas, chemicals and metal product manufacturing, transport and 

storage, and primary production and food processing. 

Chapter 7 looks at the wider contributions of Port Taranaki to regional economic development, around corporate 

citizenship, regional rates relief and economic development opportunities. 

Chapter 8 contains the Appendix, which includes the approach used to value the Port

’s

 activity and the methodology 



behind the economic impact assessment. 

 

 



Final Report 

 



Port Taranaki Economic Impact 

November 2012 



Consultation 

BERL met with the following clients and stakeholders to better understand the value and relationships of Port 

Taranaki. 

 



Mike Nield 

 

Taranaki Regional Council 



 

Chris Greenough 



 

Kotahi (Fonterra) 

 

Tracy Whelan  



 

AWE 


 

Arun Chaudhari 



 

Port Taranaki 

 

Paul Campbell 



 

Port Taranaki 

 

Glen Murdoch 



 

ANZCO Foods 

 

Stuart Trundle 



 

Venture Taranaki 

 

Harry Duynhoven 



 

Mayor, New Plymouth 

 

Frank Versteeg 



 

New Plymouth District Council 

 

Maureen Crombie   



New Plymouth District Council 

 



Anthony Wilson 

 

New Plymouth District Council 



Photographs 

Unless otherwise credited, the photographs used in this report were taken by Pip Guthrie and supplied by Port 

Taranaki. 


Final Report 

 



Port Taranaki Economic Impact 

November 2012 



3. 

Ports as a strategic regional asset

 

Ports play an important role in a regional economy, particularly export focussed 

regions such as the Taranaki.  An efficient port supports exporters and importers, 

reducing cost and improving access and options.  Ports can act as an attractor of 

export focused, port dependant or transport related businesses.   

Ports can also play an important role in place-shaping. Particularly because many 

cities/settlements have developed around a port, which means that many  ports are 

situated in the heart of built up urban areas, often with excellent road and rail 

links. 

3.1 

Regional role 

Well-functioning ports are an enabling asset within a regional context.  Ports can support business productivity and 

activity offering the benefit of economies of scale.  They act as a hub of economic activity, facilitating the movement 

of goods produced within the region, but also across the hinterland. 

An effective port can keep logistics costs competitive and broaden access to markets.  They can also act to retain or 

attract export based industries that can benefit from being within close proximity to a port.  Further, ports can be a 

crucial part of an industry’s production process, for exampl

e, the fishing industry and, in the case of Taranaki, the oil 

and gas industry. 

Finally, ports, due to their central location in relation to the main settlement, and their position on prime waterfront 

property, can often support urban design and place-shaping initiatives that can encourage economic and social 

wellbeing outcomes. 

There are 13 functioning ports in New Zealand and all are majority owned by local government.  There are issues 

around the viability and efficiency of these ports in light of changes in the shipping industry and the functioning of 

the New Zealand transport network. 

The ‘Connecting New Zealand’ report

 states that the decision around the role and number of ports in New Zealand 

will continue to be made by port owners operating in a commercial environment.

1

    


The report also stated that the 

government’s role should be to ensure the right price signals are in place and land

-

based infrastructure, such as road and rail, can meet the needs of the freight industry as it evolves.  



BERL’s view 

is that the strategic role a port plays in supporting export based businesses and the opportunity to 

maximise the economic and social benefits to the region is a major case for ownership of ports to remain in the 

hands of local government. 

The Taranaki Region has significant oil and gas reserves and prospects.  The oil and gas industry (in fact several 

industries if we include heavy engineering) has grown up around oil and gas exploration and extraction.  A number 

of key industries rely on Port Taranaki for transport and support services.  This is particularly so for the oil and gas 

                                                                 

1

 Ministry of Transport (2011).  Connecting New Zealand.  A Summary of the Government’s Policy Direction for Transport. 



Final Report 

 



Port Taranaki Economic Impact 

November 2012 

industry, but also for the primary industries (dairy, meat, forestry and fishing), and some manufacturing industries in 

the Region.  Products from these industries are relatively bulky and/or difficult/costly to transport.  Therefore many 

of them rely on, and benefit greatly from, their ability to transport their products to export markets through Port 

Taranaki. 

Similarly, other bulky imports and exports (for example engineering material and machinery) could become more 

costly and even uneconomic if they had to be trucked or railed out of or into the Region, which may reduce the 

desirability of operating a business in the Region. 

Finally, ports have an economic and social role in terms of place-shaping and community development.  This is 

largely a legacy of cities and industry activity developing around ports. 

3.2 

National role 

The Government’s overall objective for transport is to have an effective, efficient, 

safe, secure, accessible and resilient transport system that supports the growth of 

our country’s economy, in order to deliver greater prosperity, security and 

opportunities for all New Zealanders

1

 

As a nation dependent upon trade, ports are vital to the New Zealand economy.  They account for 99.7 percent of 

New Zealand’s exports and 99.5 percent of New Zealand imports.  By value, New Zealand’s sea ports account for 

83.0 percent of exports and 78.4 percent of 

imports.  

Ports also play a role as coastal feeders for 

container products, as well as in the movement of 

bulk goods such as cement and fuel. 

At a national level, ports form a part of the 

national transport system, which includes, road, 

rail, air and sea ports.  Road and rail provide the 

bulk of the domestic system, particularly for 

freight movement while sea and air are our links 

to global markets. 

Transportation is a key connection between 

businesses and trade.  To ensure New Zealand 

remains internationally competitive, New Zealand 

must improve the efficiency and free movement of 

goods across our transport network, which 

includes the links between rail, air and sea ports. 

There are mounting pressures on business and 

trade, particularly when freight volume and 

movements are predicted to double in the next 30 

years, fuel prices are expected to remain volatile, 

and where international responses to issues such 

as greenhouse gas emissions and transport 

security can impose additional costs on our exporters. 

National Direction for Maritime Transport  

The national direction for maritime transport has changed 

since the National Party took office in 2008. 

The current Government’s focus for the maritime sector is 

on port productivity issues, improving public information 

on the performance of maritime and freight transport, and 

improving the safety of the maritime sector. 

The Productivity Commission released a report in April 

2012 which evaluated the factors influencing the 

accessibility and efficiency of international freight transport 

services available to New Zealand firms, and opportunities 

to increase accessibility and efficiency of these services. 

While port charges are not a large part of total freight 

costs, the potential impact of ports on the overall supply 

chain is larger than this would suggest.  Ports can be a 

choke point, because delays or poor reliability in them can 

have cascading impacts on later stages in the supply 

chain.  The Commission found that there was room for 

improvement in terms of improving workplace productivity 

and strengthening port governance. 



Final Report 

10 


 

Port Taranaki Economic Impact 

November 2012 

To deliver the overall transport objective, the Government is focussing on three key areas: economic growth and 

productivity; value for money; and road safety. 

The government is focussing on improving public information on maritime and freight transport.  This will not only 

help improve investment decisions by port owners, but also improve future landside investment decisions. 

In addition to the above, the Government has also commenced a Freight Information Gathering System, which 

provides information on international and domestic freight flows through New Zealand ports, and the transport 

modes used for those freight flows to inform future transport decisions. 



Final Report 

11 


 

Port Taranaki Economic Impact 

November 2012 



Yüklə 446,05 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə