Guidelines and standards



Yüklə 9.02 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/16
tarix06.02.2017
ölçüsü9.02 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16

GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS

Multimodality Imaging of Diseases of the Thoracic

Aorta in Adults: From the American Society

of Echocardiography and the European Association

of Cardiovascular Imaging

Endorsed by the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography

and Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

Steven A. Goldstein, MD, Co-Chair, Arturo Evangelista, MD, FESC, Co-Chair, Suhny Abbara, MD,

Andrew Arai, MD, Federico M. Asch, MD, FASE, Luigi P. Badano, MD, PhD, FESC, Michael A. Bolen, MD,

Heidi M. Connolly, MD, Hug Cu

ellar-Calabria, MD, Martin Czerny, MD, Richard B. Devereux, MD,

Raimund A. Erbel, MD, FASE, FESC, Rossella Fattori, MD, Eric M. Isselbacher, MD, Joseph M. Lindsay, MD,

Marti McCulloch, MBA, RDCS, FASE, Hector I. Michelena, MD, FASE, Christoph A. Nienaber, MD, FESC,

Jae K. Oh, MD, FASE, Mauro Pepi, MD, FESC, Allen J. Taylor, MD, Jonathan W. Weinsaft, MD,

Jose Luis Zamorano, MD, FESC, FASE, Contributing Editors: Harry Dietz, MD, Kim Eagle, MD,

John Elefteriades, MD, Guillaume Jondeau, MD, PhD, FESC, Herv

e Rousseau, MD, PhD,

and Marc Schepens, MD,

Washington, District of Columbia; Barcelona and Madrid, Spain; Dallas and Houston,

Texas; Bethesda and Baltimore, Maryland; Padua, Pesaro, and Milan, Italy; Cleveland, Ohio; Rochester, Minnesota;

Zurich, Switzerland; New York, New York; Essen and Rostock, Germany; Boston, Massachusetts; Ann Arbor,

Michigan; New Haven, Connecticut; Paris and Toulouse, France; and Brugge, Belgium

(J Am Soc Echocardiogr 2015;28:119-82.)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Preamble

121


I. Anatomy and Physiology of the Aorta

121


A. The Normal Aorta and Reference Values

121


1. Normal Aortic Dimensions

122


B. How to Measure the Aorta

124


1. Interface,

Definitions,

and

Timing


of

Aortic


Measure-

ments


124

From the Medstar Heart Institute at the Washington Hospital Center, Washington,

District of Columbia (S.A.G., F.M.A., J.M.L., A.J.T.); Vall d’Hebron University

Hospital, Barcelona, Spain (A.E., H.C.-C.); the University of Texas Southwestern

Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (S.A.); the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,

Maryland (A.A.); the University of Padua, Padua, Italy (L.P.B.); Cleveland Clinic,

Cleveland, Ohio (M.A.B.); Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (H.M.C., H.I.M.,

J.K.O.); the University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland (M.C.); Weill Cornell

Medical College, New York, New York (R.B.D., J.W.W.); West-German Heart

Center, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany (R.A.E.); San Salvatore

Hospital, Pesaro,

Italy


(R.F.); Massachusetts

General


Hospital,

Boston,


Massachusetts (E.M.I.); the Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center,

Houston, Texas; the University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany (C.A.N.); Centro

Cardiologico Monzino, IRCCS, Milan, Italy (M.P.); University Hospital Ram

on y


Cajal, Madrid, Spain (J.L.Z.); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine,

Baltimore, Maryland (H.D.); the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

(K.E.); Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (J.E.);

Hopital Bichat, Paris, France (G.J.); Hopital de Rangueil, Toulouse, France

(H.R.); and AZ St Jan Brugge, Brugge, Belgium (M.S.).

The following authors reported no actual or potential conflicts of interest in rela-

tion to this document: Federico M. Asch, MD, FASE, Michael A. Bolen, MD, Heidi

M. Connolly, MD, Hug Cu

ellar-Calabria, MD, Martin Czerny, MD, Richard B. De-

vereux, MD Harry Dietz, MD, Raimund A. Erbel, MD, FASE, FESC, Arturo Evan-

gelista, MD, FESC, Rossella Fattori, MD, Steven A. Goldstein, MD, Guillaume

Jondeau, MD, PhD, FESC, Eric M. Isselbacher, MD, Joseph M. Lindsay, MD,

Marti McCulloch, MBA, RDCS, FASE, Hector I. Michelena, MD, FASE, Christoph

Nienaber, MD, FESC, Mauro Pepi, MD, FESC, Marc Schepens, MD, Allen J.

Taylor, MD, and Jose Luis Zamorano, MD, FESC, FASE. The following authors

reported relationships with one or more commercial interests: Suhny Abbara,

MD, serves as a consultant for Perceptive Informatics. Andrew Arai, MD, re-

ceives research support from Siemens. Luigi P. Badano, MD, PhD, FESC, has

received software and equipment from GE Healthcare, Siemens, and TomTec

for research and testing purposes and is on the speakers’ bureau of GE Health-

care. Kim Eagle, MD, received a research grant from GORE. John Elefteriades,

MD, has a book published by CardioText and is a principal investigator on a

grant and clinical trial from Medtronic. Jae K. Oh, MD, received a research grant

from Toshiba and core laboratory support from Medtronic. Herv

e Rousseau, MD,

serves as a consultant for GORE, Medtronic, and Bolton. Jonathan W. Weinsaft,

MD, received a research grant from Lantheus Medical Imaging.

Attention ASE Members:

The ASE has gone green! Visit

www.aseuniversity.org

to earn free continuing

medical education credit through an online activity related to this article.

Certificates are available for immediate access upon successful completion

of the activity. Nonmembers will need to join the ASE to access this great

member benefit!

Reprint requests: American Society of Echocardiography, 2100 Gateway Centre

Boulevard, Suite 310, Morrisville, NC 27560 (E-mail:

ase@asecho.org

).

0894-7317/$36.00



Copyright 2015 by the American Society of Echocardiography.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.echo.2014.11.015

119


2. Geometry of Different

Aortic Segments:

Impact on Measure-

ments


126

a. Aortic

Annulus

126


b. Sinuses

of

Valsalva



and STJ

126


c. Ascending Aorta and

More Distal Seg-

ments

126


C. Aortic

Physiology

and

Function


127

1. Local Indices of Aortic

Function

127


2. Regional

Indices


of

Aortic Stiffness: Pulse-

wave Velocity

(PWV)


128

II. Imaging Techniques

129

A. Chest X-Ray (CXR)



129

B. TTE


129

C. TEE


130

1. Imaging

of

the


Aorta

130


D. Three-Dimensional Echo-

cardiography

131

E. Intravascular



Ultrasound

(IVUS)


131

1. Limitations

131

F. CT


131

1. Methodology

132

a. CTA


132

i. Noncontrast

CT

before Aortog-



raphy

133


ii. Electrocardiograph-

ically Gated

CTA

133


iii. Thoracoabdominal

CT after Aortog-

raphy

133


iv. Exposure

to

Ionizing Radia-



tion

134


v. Measure-

ments


134

G. MRI


135

1. Black-Blood

Se-

quences


135

2. Cine


MRI

Se-


quences

135


3. Flow Mapping

135


4. Contrast-Enhanced MR

Angiography

(MRA)

135


5. Artifacts

136


H. Invasive

Aortog-


raphy

136


I. Comparison of Imaging Techniques

137


III. Acute Aortic Syndromes

138


A. Introduction

138


B. Aortic Dissection

138


1. Classification of Aortic Dissection

138


2. Echocardiography (TTE and TEE)

139


a. Echocardiographic Findings

140


b. Detection of Complications

141


c. Limitations of TEE

141


3. CT

141


4. MRI of Aortic Dissection

143


5. Imaging Algorithm

144


6. Use of TEE to Guide Surgery for Type A Aortic Dissection

144


7. Use of Imaging Procedures to Guide Endovascular Ther-

apy


146

8. Serial Follow-Up of Aortic Dissection (Choice of Tests)

147

9. Predictors of Complications by Imaging Techniques



148

a. Maximum Aortic Diameter

148

b. Patent False Lumen



148

c. Partial False Luminal Thrombosis

149

d. Entry Tear Size



149

e. True Luminal Compression

149

10. Follow-Up Strategy



149

C. IMH


149

1. Introduction

149

2. Imaging Hallmarks and Features



149

3. Imaging Algorithm

151

4. Serial Follow-Up of IMH (Choice of Tests)



151

5. Predictors of Complications

151

D. PAU


151

1. Introduction

151

2. Imaging Features



151

3. Imaging Modalities

152

a. CT


152

b. MRI


152

c. TEE


152

d. Aortography

152

4. Imaging Algorithm



153

5. Serial Follow-Up of PAU (Choice of Tests)

153

IV. Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm



153

A. Definitions and Terminology

153

B. Classification of Aneurysms



154

C. Morphology

154

D. Serial Follow-Up of Aortic Aneurysms (Choice of Tests)



154

1. Algorithm for Follow-Up

155

E. Use of TEE to Guide Surgery for TAAs



155

F. Specific Conditions

156

1. Marfan Syndrome



156

a. Aortic Imaging in Unoperated Patients with Marfan Syn-

drome

156


b. Postoperative Aortic Imaging in Marfan Syndrome

157


c. Postdissection Aortic Imaging in Marfan Syndrome

157


d. Family Screening

157


2. Other Genetic Diseases of the Aorta in Adults

157


a. Turner Syndrome

157


b. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

157


c. Familial TAAs

157


d. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

157


3. BAV-Related Aortopathy

157


a. Bicuspid Valve–Related Aortopathy

157


b. Imaging of the Aorta in Patients with Unoperated BAVs

158


c. Follow-Up Imaging of the Aorta in Patients with Unoperated

BAVs


158

d. Postoperative Aortic Imaging in Patients with BAV-Related

Aortopathy

158


e. Family Screening

159


V. Traumatic Injury to the Thoracic Aorta

159


A. Pathology

159


B. Imaging Modalities

160


1. CXR

160


2. Aortography

160


3. CT

160


Abbreviations

AAS


= Acute aortic syndrome

AR

= Aortic regurgitation



ASE

= American Society of

Echocardiography

BAI


= Blunt aortic injury

BSA


= Body surface area

CT

= Computed tomography



CTA

= Computed

tomographic aortography

CXR


= Chest x-ray

EACVI


= European

Association of Cardiovascular

Imaging

EAU


= Epiaortic ultrasound

GCA


= Giant-cell (temporal)

arteritis

ICM

= Iodinated contrast



media

IMH


= Intramural hematoma

IRAD


= International Registry

of Acute Aortic Dissection

MDCT

= Multidetector



computed tomography

MIP


= Maximum-intensity

projection

MR

= Magnetic resonance



MRI

= Magnetic resonance

imaging

PWV


= Pulsewave velocity

STJ


= Sinotubular junction

TA

= Takayasu arteritis



TEE

= Transesophageal

echocardiography

TEVAR


= Transthoracic

endovascular aortic repair

3D

= Three-dimensional



TTE

= Transthoracic

echocardiography

2D

= Two-dimensional



ULP

= Ulcerlike projection

120 Goldstein et al

Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography

February 2015


4. TEE

161


5. IVUS

161


6. MRI

162


C. Imaging Algorithm

162


D. Imaging in Endovascular Repair

162


VI. Aortic Coarctation

162


A. Aortic Imaging in Patients with Unoperated Aortic Coarcta-

tion


163

B. Postoperative Aortic Imaging in Coarctation

164

VII. Atherosclerosis



164

A. Plaque Morphology and Classification

164

B. Imaging Modalities



165

1. Echocardiography

165

2. Epiaortic Ultrasound (EAU)



165

3. CT


166

4. MRI


166

C. Imaging Algorithm

166

D. Serial Follow-Up of Atherosclerosis (Choice of Tests)



167

VIII.Aortitis

167

A. Mycotic Aneurysms of the Aorta



167

B. Noninfectious Aortitis

168

IX. Postsurgical Imaging of the Aortic Root and Aorta



169

A. What the Imager Needs to Know

169

B. Common Aortic Surgical Techniques



169

1. Interposition Technique

169

2. Inclusion Technique



169

3. Composite Grafts

169

4. Aortic Arch Grafts



169

5. Elephant Trunk Procedure

169

6. Cabrol Shunt Procedure



170

7. Technical Adjuncts

170

C. Normal Postoperative Features



170

D. Complications after Aortic Repair

170

1. Pseudoaneurysm



170

2. False Luminal Dilatation

170

3. Involvement of Aortic Branches



171

4. Infection

171

E. Recommendations for Serial Imaging Techniques and



Schedules

171


X. Summary

171


Notice and Disclaimer

171


References

171


PREAMBLE

Aortic pathologies are numerous, presenting manifestations are varied,

and aortic diseases present to many clinical services, including primary

physicians, emergency department physicians, cardiologists, cardiac sur-

geons, vascular surgeons, echocardiographers, radiologists, computed

tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) im-

agers, and intensivists. Many aortic diseases manifest emergently and

are potentially catastrophic unless suspected and detected promptly

and accurately. Optimal management of these conditions depends on

the reported findings from a handful of imaging modalities, including

echocardiography, CT, MRI, and to a lesser extent invasive aortography.

In the past decade, there have been remarkable advances in nonin-

vasive imaging of aortic diseases. This document is intended to provide a

comprehensive review of the applications of these noninvasive imaging

modalities to aortic disease. Emphasis is on the advantages and disad-

vantages of each modality when applied to each of the various aortic

diseases. Presently, there is a lack of consensus on the relative role

(comparative effectiveness) of these imaging modalities. An attempt

has been made to determine first-line and second-line choices for

some of these specific conditions. Importantly, we have emphasized

the need for uniform terminology and measurement techniques.

Whenever possible, these recommendations are evidence based,

following a critical review of the literature. In some instances, the recom-

mendations reflect a consensus of the expert writing group and include

‘‘vetting’’ by additional experts from the supporting imaging societies.

Because of the importance of prompt recognition to their successful

treatment, this review emphasizes acute aortic syndromes (AAS), such

as aortic dissection and its variants (e.g., intramural hematoma [IMH]),

rupture of ascending aortic aneurysm, aortic trauma, and penetrating

ulcer. Other entities, such as Takayasu aortitis (TA), giant-cell (temporal)

arteritis (GCA), and mycotic aneurysm, are discussed briefly. Less com-

mon aortic diseases such as aortic tumors (because of their rarity) and

congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries, aortic arch, and sinus of

Valsalva aneurysms are not addressed. Several other topics are also

beyond the scope of this review, including the important and emerging

role of genetics in the evaluation and management of aortic diseases.

Moreover, this document is not intended to replace or extend the rec-

ommendations of prior excellent guidelines in decision making and

management for these conditions.

1

To summarize, the focus of this document is the fundamental role



of the major noninvasive imaging techniques. In addition to clinical

acumen and suspicion, knowledge of these imaging modalities is

crucial for the assessment and management of the often life-

threatening diseases of the aorta.

I. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF THE AORTA

A. The Normal Aorta and Reference Values

The aorta is the largest and strongest artery in the body; its wall consists

of three layers: the thin inner layer or intima, a thick middle layer or me-

dia, and a rather thin outer layer, or adventitia. The endothelium-lined

aortic intima is a thin, delicate layer and is easily traumatized. The media

is composed of smooth muscle cells and multiple layers of elastic

laminae that provide not only tensile strength but also distensibility

and elasticity, properties vital to the aorta’s circulatory role. The adven-

titia contains mainly collagen as well as the vasa vasorum, which

nourish the outer half of the aortic wall and a major part of the media.

The elastic properties of the aorta are important to its normal func-

tion. The elasticity of the wall allows the aorta to accept the pulsatile

output of the left ventricle in systole and to modulate continued

forward flow during diastole. With aging the medial elastic fibers

undergo thinning and fragmentation. The ordinary concentric

arrangement of the laminae is disturbed. These degenerative changes

are accompanied by increases in collagen and ground substance. The

loss of elasticity and compliance of the aortic wall contributes to the

increase in pulse pressure commonly seen in the elderly and may

be accompanied by progressive dilatation of the aorta.

A geometrically complex organ, the aorta begins at the

bulb-shaped root (level 1 in

Figure 1


) and then courses through the

chest and abdomen in a candy cane–shaped configuration, with a var-

iable orientation to the long axis of the body, until it terminates in the

iliac bifurcation. The aorta consists of five main anatomic segments:

the aortic root, the tubular portion of the ascending aorta, the aortic

arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta. The

most proximal part of the ascending aorta, the aortic root (segment

I in


Figure 1

), includes the aortic valve annulus, aortic valve cusps,

Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography

Volume 28 Number 2

Goldstein et al 121


coronary ostia, and sinuses of Valsalva. Distally the root joins the

tubular portion of the ascending aorta (segment II) at an easily recog-

nized landmark termed the sinotubular junction (STJ). The tubular

portion of the ascending aorta extends from the STJ to the origin of

the brachiocephalic artery. This relatively long segment is subdivided

into segment IIa, which extends from the STJ to the pulmonary artery

level, and segment IIb, from the pulmonary artery level to the brachio-

cephalic artery. The aortic arch (segment III) extends from the bra-

chiocephalic artery to the left subclavian artery. The descending

thoracic aorta (segment IV) may be subdivided into the proximal

part (segment IVa), which extends from the left subclavian artery to

the level of the pulmonary artery, and the distal part (segment IVb),

which extends from the level of the pulmonary artery to the dia-

phragm. The abdominal aorta (segment V) may be subdivided into

the proximal part (segment Va), which extends from the diaphragm

to the ostia of the renal arteries, and the distal part (segment Vb),

from the renal arteries to the iliac bifurcation.

1. Normal Aortic Dimensions.

Because of the ease with which it

can be visualized and its clinical relevance,

2,3

the aortic root is the



segment for which the greatest amount of data are available.

Several large studies have reported normal aortic root diameters in

the parasternal long-axis view by two-dimensional (2D) transthoracic

echocardiography (TTE).

4-10

Measurement of the aortic root



diameter should be made perpendicular to the axis of the proximal

aorta, recorded from several slightly differently oriented long-axis

views. The standard measurement is taken as the largest diameter

from the right coronary sinus of Valsalva to the posterior (usually non-

coronary) sinus. Most studies report aortic root diameter measure-

ments at end-diastole using the leading edge–to–leading edge

technique (

Figure 2


).

In adults, aortic dimensions are strongly positively correlated with

age

5-8,10,11



and body size.

4-6,8,10,11

They are larger in men than in

women of the same age and body size.

6,12,13

Although in several



reports, aortic diameters have been normalized to body surface

area (BSA),

10,13,14

this approach has not been entirely satisfactory

because it is systematically lower in smaller than in larger normal

adults. Fortunately, among children, the regression line of aortic

diameter and height (rather than BSA) has a near-zero intercept, so

that normalization to height has proved to be a simple and accurate

alternative in growing children.

15

Benchmark values from which



the guidelines have been taken

1,16


come from the work of

Roman et al.,




Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   16


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə