Plum and posner’s diagnosis of stupor and coma fourth Edition series editor sid Gilman, md, frcp



Yüklə 9,02 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/73
tarix09.02.2017
ölçüsü9,02 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   73

PLUM AND POSNER’S DIAGNOSIS

OF STUPOR AND COMA

Fourth Edition


SERIES EDITOR

Sid Gilman, MD, FRCP

William J. Herdman Distinguished University Professor of Neurology

University of Michigan

Contemporary Neurology Series

53 SLEEP MEDICINE

Michael S. Aldrich, MD

54 BRAIN TUMORS

Harry S. Greenberg, MD, William

F. Chandler, MD, and Howard M.

Sandler, MD

56 MYASTHENIA GRAVIS AND

MYASTHENIC DISORDERS

Andrew G. Engel, MD, Editor

57 NEUROGENETICS

Stefan-M. Pulst, MD, Dr. Med., Editor

58 DISEASES OF THE SPINE

AND SPINAL CORD

Thomas N. Byrne, MD, Edward C.

Benzel, MD, and Stephen G.

Waxman, MD, PhD

59 DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF

PERIPHERAL NERVE DISORDERS

Jerry R. Mendell, MD, John T. Kissel, MD,

and David R. Cornblath, MD

60 THE NEUROLOGY OF VISION

Jonathan D. Trobe, MD

61 HIV NEUROLOGY

Bruce James Brew, MBBS, MD, FRACP

62 ISCHEMIC CEREBROVASCULAR

DISEASE

Harold P. Adams, Jr., MD, Vladimir



Hachinski, MD, and John W. Norris, MD

63 CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY OF

THE VESTIBULAR SYSTEM, Third Edition

Robert W. Baloh, MD, and Vicente

Honrubia, MD

64 NEUROLOGICAL COMPLICATIONS OF

CRITICAL ILLNESS, Second Edition

Eelco F.M. Wijdicks, MD, PhD, FACP

65 MIGRAINE: MANIFESTATIONS,

PATHOGENESIS, AND MANAGEMENT,

Second Edition

Robert A. Davidoff, MD

66 CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY,

Second Edition

Jasper R. Daube, MD, Editor

67 THE CLINICAL SCIENCE OF

NEUROLOGIC REHABILITATION,

Second Edition

Bruce H. Dobkin, MD

68 NEUROLOGY OF COGNITIVE AND

BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS

Orrin Devinsky, MD, and Mark

D’Esposito, MD

69 PALLIATIVE CARE IN NEUROLOGY

Raymond Voltz, MD, James L. Bernat, MD,

Gian Domenico Borasio, MD, DipPallMed,

Ian Maddocks, MD, David Oliver, FRCGP,

and Russell K. Portenoy, MD

70 THE NEUROLOGY OF EYE

MOVEMENTS, Fourth Edition

R. John Leigh, MD, FRCP, and

David S. Zee, MD



PLUM AND POSNER’S DIAGNOSIS

OF STUPOR AND COMA

Fourth Edition

Jerome B. Posner, MD

George C. Cotzias Chair of Neuro-oncology

Evelyn Frew American Cancer Society Clinical Research Professor

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

New York, NY

Clifford B. Saper, MD, PhD

James Jackson Putnam Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience,

Harvard Medical School

Chairman, Department of Neurology

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Boston, MA

Nicholas D. Schiff, MD

Associate Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience

Department of Neurology and Neuroscience

Weill Cornell Medical College

New York, NY

Fred Plum, MD

University Professor Emeritus

Department of Neurology and Neuroscience

Weill Cornell Medical College

New York, NY

1

2007


1

Oxford University Press, Inc., publishes works that further

Oxford University’s objective of excellence

in research, scholarship, and education.

Oxford New York

Auckland Cape Town Dar es Salaam Hong Kong Karachi

Kuala Lumpur Madrid Melbourne Mexico City Nairobi

New Delhi Shanghai Taipei Toronto

With offices in

Argentina Austria Brazil Chile Czech Republic France Greece

Guatemala Hungary Italy Japan Poland Portugal Singapore

South Korea Switzerland Thailand Turkey Ukraine Vietnam

Copyright # 2007 by Oxford University Press, Inc.

Published by Oxford University Press, Inc.

198 Madison Avenue, New York, New York 10016

www.oup.com

Oxford is a registered trademark of Oxford University Press

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced,

stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means,

electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise,

without the prior permission of Oxford University Press.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Plum and Posner’s diagnosis of stupor and coma / Jerome B. Posner . . . [et al.]. — 4th ed.

p. ; cm.—(Contemporary neurology series ; 71)

Rev. ed. of: The diagnosis of stupor and coma / Fred Plum, Jerome B. Posner. 3rd ed. c1980.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

ISBN 978-0-19-532131-9

1. Coma—Diagnosis. 2. Stupor—Diagnosis. I. Posner, Jerome B., 1932– II. Plum, Fred, 1924–

Diagnosis of stupor and coma. III. Title: Diagnosis of stupor and coma. IV. Series.

[DNLM: 1. Coma—diagnosis. 2. Stupor—diagnosis. 3. Brain Diseases—diagnosis.

4. Brain Injuries—diagnosis.

W1 CO769N v.71 2007 / WB 182 P7335 2007]

RB150.C6P55 2007

616.8'49—dc22

2006103219

9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Printed in the United States of America

on acid-free paper



Jerome Posner, Clifford Saper and Nicholas Schiff dedicate this book to

Fred Plum, our mentor. His pioneering studies into coma and its

pathophysiology made the first edition of this book possible and

have contributed to all of the subsequent editions, including this one.

His insistence on excellence, although often hard to attain, has been

an inspiration and a guide for our careers.

The authors also dedicate this book to our wives, whose encouragement

and support make our work not only possible but also pleasant.



Preface to the Fourth Edition

Fred Plum came to the University of Washington in 1952 to head up the Division of

Neurology (in the Department of Medicine) that consisted of one person, Fred. The

University had no hospital but instead used the county hospital (King County Hospital),

now called Harborview. The only emergency room in the entire county was at that hos-

pital, and thus it received all of the comatose patients in the area. The only noninva-

sive imaging available was primitive ultrasound that could identify, sometimes, whether

the pineal gland was in the midline. Thus, Fred and his residents (August Swanson,

Jerome Posner, and Donald McNealy, in that order) searched for clinical ways to dif-

ferentiate those lesions that required neurosurgical intervention from those that required

medical treatment. The result was the first edition of The Diagnosis of Stupor and Coma.

Times have changed. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance ima-

ging (MRI) have revolutionized the approach to the patient with an altered level of

consciousness. The physician confronted with such a patient usually first images the

brain and then if the image does not show a mass or destructive lesion, pursues a careful

metabolic workup. Even the laboratory evaluation has changed. In the 1950s the only

pH meter in the hospital was in our experimental laboratory and many of the metabolic

tests that we now consider routine were time consuming and not available in a timely

fashion. Yet the clinical approach taught in The Diagnosis of Stupor and Coma remains

the cornerstone of medical care for comatose patients in virtually every hospital, and the

need for a modern updating of the text has been clear for some time.

The appearance of a fourth edition now called Plum and Posner’s Diagnosis of

Stupor and Coma more than 25 years after the third edition is deserving of comment.

There were several reasons for this delay. First, the introduction and rapid development

of MRI scanning almost immediately after the publication of the last edition both

stimulated the authors to prepare a new edition and also delayed the efforts, as new

information using the new MRI methods accumulated at a rapid pace and dramatically

changed the field over the next decade. At the same time, there was substantial progress

in theory on the neural basis of consciousness, and the senior author wanted to incor-

porate as much of that new material as possible into the new edition. A second obstacle

to the early completion of a fourth edition was the retirement of the senior author, who

also developed some difficulty with expressive language. It became apparent that the

senior author was not going to be able to complete the new edition with the eloquence

for which he had been known. Ultimately, the two original authors asked two of their

proteges, CBS and NDS, to help with the preparation of the new edition. Fred parti-

cipated in the initial drafts of this edition, but not fully in the final product. Thus, the

mistakes and wrongheaded opinions you might find in this edition are ours and not his.

We as his students feel privileged to be able to continue and update his classic work.

One of our most important goals was to retain the clear and authoritative voice of the

senior author in the current revision. Even though much of the text has been rewritten,

we worked from the original organizational and conceptual context of the third edition.

Fred Plum’s description of how one examines an unconscious patient was, and is, clas-

sic. Accordingly, we’ve tried whenever possible to use his words from the first three


editions. Because the clinical examination remains largely unchanged, we could use

some of the case reports and many of the figures describing the clinical examination from

previous editions. Fred was present at each of the critical editorial meetings, and he

continued to contribute to the overall structure and scientific and clinical content of the

book. Most important, he instilled his ideas and views into each of the other authors,

whom he taught and mentored over many years. The primary writing tasks for the first

four chapters fell to CBS, Chapters 5 to 7 to JBP, and Chapters 8 and 9 to NDS. However,

each of the chapters was passed back and forth and revised and edited by each of the

authors, so that the responsibility for the content of the fourth edition remains joint and

several.


Most important, although the technologic evaluation of patients in coma has

changed in ways that were unimaginable at the time of publication of the earlier edi-

tions, the underlying principles of evaluation and management have not. The exam-

ination of the comatose patient remains the cornerstone to clinical judgment. It is much

faster and more accurate than any imaging study, and accurate clinical assessment is

necessary to determine what steps are required for further evaluation, to determine the

tempo of the workup, and most important, to identify those patients in critical condition

who need emergency intervention. Coma remains a classic problem in neurology, in

which intervention within minutes can often make the difference between life and death

for the patient. In this sense, the fourth edition of Plum and Posner’s Diagnosis of Stupor

and Coma does not differ from its predecessors in offering a straightforward approach

to diagnosis and management of these critically ill patients.

The authors owe a debt of gratitude to many colleagues who have helped us prepare

this edition of the book. Dr. Joe Fins generously contributed a section on ethics to

Chapter 8 that the other authors would not have otherwise been able to provide. Chap-

ters were reviewed at various stages of preparation by Drs. George Richerson, Michael

Ronthal, Jonathan Edlow, Richard Wolfe, Josef Parvizi, Matt Fink, Richard Lappin,

Steven Laureys, Marcus Yountz, Veronique van der Horst, Amy Amick, Nicholas Sil-

vestri, and John Whyte. These colleagues have helped us avoid innumerable missteps.

The remaining errors, however, are our own. Drs. Jonathan Kleefield and Linda Heier

have provided us with radiologic images and Dr. Jeffrey Joseph with pathological images.

The clarity of their vision has contributed to our own, and illuminates many of the ideas

in this book. We also thank Judy Lampron, who read the entire book correcting typos,

spelling errors (better than spellcheck), and awkward sentences. We owe our gratitude

to a series of patient editors at Oxford University Press who have worked with the authors

as we have prepared this edition. Included among these are Fiona Stevens, who worked

with us on restarting the project, and Craig Panner, who edited the final manuscript. Sid

Gilman, the series editor, has provided continuous support and encouragement.

Finally, we want to thank the members of our families, who have put up with our

intellectual reveries and physical absences as we have prepared the material in this

book. It has taken much more time than any of us had expected, but it has been a labor

of love.


Fred Plum, MD

Jerome B. Posner, MD

Clifford B. Saper, MD, PhD

Nicholas D. Schiff, MD

viii

Preface to the Fourth Edition



Contents

1. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF COMA 3

ALTERED STATES OF CONSCIOUSNESS 3

DEFINITIONS 5

Consciousness



Acutely Altered States of Consciousness





Subacute or Chronic

Alterations of Consciousness

APPROACH TO THE DIAGNOSIS OF THE COMATOSE PATIENT 9

PHYSIOLOGY AND PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF CONSCIOUSNESS

AND COMA 11

The Ascending Arousal System



Behavioral State Switching





Relationship of

Coma to Sleep



The Cerebral Hemispheres and Conscious Behavior





Structural

Lesions That Cause Altered Consciousness in Humans

2. EXAMINATION OF THE COMATOSE PATIENT 38

OVERVIEW 38

HISTORY 39

GENERAL PHYSICAL EXAMINATION 40

LEVEL OF CONSCIOUSNESS 40

ABC: AIRWAY, BREATHING, CIRCULATION 42

Circulation



Respiration



PUPILLARY RESPONSES 54

Examine the Pupils and Their Responses



Pathophysiology of Pupillary Responses:



Peripheral Anatomy of the Pupillomotor System



Pharmacology of the Peripheral



Pupillomotor System



Localizing Value of Abnormal Pupillary Responses



in Patients in Coma



Metabolic and Pharmacologic Causes of Abnormal



Pupillary Response

OCULOMOTOR RESPONSES 60

Functional Anatomy of the Peripheral Oculomotor System



Functional Anatomy of the



Central Oculomotor System



The Ocular Motor Examination





Interpretation of

Abnormal Ocular Movements

MOTOR RESPONSES 72

Motor Tone



Motor Reflexes





Motor Responses

FALSE LOCALIZING SIGNS IN PATIENTS WITH

METABOLIC COMA 75

Respiratory Responses



Pupillary Responses





Ocular Motor Responses



Motor


Responses

ix


MAJOR LABORATORY DIAGNOSTIC AIDS 77

Blood and Urine Testing



Computed Tomography Imaging and



Angiography



Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Angiography





Magnetic


Resonance Spectroscopy



Neurosonography





Lumbar


Puncture



Electroencephalography and Evoked Potentials



3. STRUCTURAL CAUSES OF STUPOR AND COMA 88

COMPRESSIVE LESIONS AS A CAUSE OF COMA 89

COMPRESSIVE LESIONS MAY DIRECTLY DISTORT

THE AROUSAL SYSTEM 90

Compression at Different Levels of the Central Nervous System Presents in Distinct

Ways




The Role of Increased Intracranial Pressure in Coma



The Role of Vascular



Factors and Cerebral Edema in Mass Lesions

HERNIATION SYNDROMES: INTRACRANIAL SHIFTS IN

THE PATHOGENESIS OF COMA 95

Anatomy of the Intracranial Compartments



Patterns of Brain Shifts That Contribute to



Coma



Clinical Findings in Uncal Herniation Syndrome





Clinical Findings in Central

Herniation Syndrome



Clinical Findings in Dorsal Midbrain Syndrome





Safety of

Lumbar Puncture in Comatose Patients



False Localizing Signs in the Diagnosis



of Structural Coma

DESTRUCTIVE LESIONS AS A CAUSE OF COMA 114

DIFFUSE, BILATERAL CORTICAL DESTRUCTION 114

DESTRUCTIVE DISEASE OF THE DIENCEPHALON 114

DESTRUCTIVE LESIONS OF THE BRAINSTEM 115

4. SPECIFIC CAUSES OF STRUCTURAL COMA 119

INTRODUCTION 120

SUPRATENTORIAL COMPRESSIVE LESIONS 120

EPIDURAL, DURAL, AND SUBDURAL MASSES 120

Epidural Hematoma



Subdural Hematoma





Epidural Abscess/Empyema



Dural and



Subdural Tumors

SUBARACHNOID LESIONS 129

Subarachnoid Hemorrhage



Subarachnoid Tumors





Subarachnoid Infection

INTRACEREBRAL MASSES 135

Intracerebral Hemorrhage



Intracerebral Tumors





Brain Abscess and Granuloma

INFRATENTORIAL COMPRESSIVE LESIONS 142

EPIDURAL AND DURAL MASSES 143

Epidural Hematoma



Epidural Abscess





Dural


and Epidural Tumors

SUBDURAL POSTERIOR FOSSA COMPRESSIVE LESIONS 144

Subdural Empyema



Subdural Tumors



x

Contents


SUBARACHNOID POSTERIOR FOSSA LESIONS 145

INTRAPARENCHYMAL POSTERIOR FOSSA MASS LESIONS 145

Cerebellar Hemorrhage



Cerebellar Infarction





Cerebellar Abscess



Cerebellar



Tumor



Pontine Hemorrhage



SUPRATENTORIAL DESTRUCTIVE LESIONS CAUSING COMA 151

VASCULAR CAUSES OF SUPRATENTORIAL

DESTRUCTIVE LESIONS 152

Carotid Ischemic Lesions



Distal Basilar Occlusion





Venous Sinus

Thrombosis



Vasculitis



INFECTIONS AND INFLAMMATORY CAUSES OF SUPRATENTORIAL

DESTRUCTIVE LESIONS 156

Viral Encephalitis



Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis



CONCUSSION AND OTHER TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURIES 159

Mechanism of Brain Injury During Closed Head Trauma



Mechanism of Loss of



Consciousness in Concussion



Delayed Encephalopathy After Head Injury



INFRATENTORIAL DESTRUCTIVE LESIONS 162

BRAINSTEM VASCULAR DESTRUCTIVE DISORDERS 163

Brainstem Hemorrhage



Basilar Migraine





Posterior Reversible

Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome

INFRATENTORIAL INFLAMMATORY DISORDERS 169

INFRATENTORIAL TUMORS 170

CENTRAL PONTINE MYELINOLYSIS 171

5. MULTIFOCAL, DIFFUSE, AND METABOLIC BRAIN DISEASES

CAUSING DELIRIUM, STUPOR, OR COMA 179

CLINICAL SIGNS OF METABOLIC ENCEPHALOPATHY 181

CONSCIOUSNESS: CLINICAL ASPECTS 181

Tests of Mental Status



Pathogenesis of the Mental Changes



RESPIRATION 187

Neurologic Respiratory Changes Accompanying Metabolic Encephalopathy



Acid-Base



Changes Accompanying Hyperventilation During Metabolic Encephalopathy



Acid-Base



Changes Accompanying Hypoventilation During Metabolic Encephalopathy

PUPILS 192

OCULAR MOTILITY 193

MOTOR ACTIVITY 194

‘‘Nonspecific’’ Motor Abnormalities



Motor Abnormalities Characteristic



of Metabolic Coma

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS 197

Distinction Between Metabolic and Psychogenic Unresponsiveness



Distinction



Between Coma of Metabolic and Structural Origin

Contents


xi

ASPECTS OF CEREBRAL METABOLISM PERTINENT

TO COMA 198

CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW 198

GLUCOSE METABOLISM 202

Hyperglycemia



Hypoglycemia



ANESTHESIA 205

MECHANISMS OF IRREVERSIBLE ANOXIC-ISCHEMIC

BRAIN DAMAGE 206

Global Ischemia



Focal Ischemia





Hypoxia


EVALUATION OF NEUROTRANSMITTER CHANGES IN

METABOLIC COMA 208

Acetylcholine



Dopamine





Gamma-Aminobutyric

Acid



Serotonin





Histamine



Glutamate





Norepinephrine

SPECIFIC CAUSES OF METABOLIC COMA 210

ISCHEMIA AND HYPOXIA 210

Acute, Diffuse (or Global) Hypoxia or Ischemia



Intermittent or Sustained



Hypoxia



Sequelae of Hypoxia



DISORDERS OF GLUCOSE OR COFACTOR AVAILABILITY 220

Hypoglycemia



Hyperglycemia





Cofactor Deficiency

DISEASES OF ORGAN SYSTEMS OTHER THAN BRAIN 224

Liver Disease



Renal Disease





Pulmonary Disease



Pancreatic



Encephalopathy



Diabetes Mellitus





Adrenal Disorders



Thyroid


Disorders



Pituitary Disorders





Cancer


EXOGENOUS INTOXICATIONS 240

Sedative and Psychotropic Drugs



Intoxication With Other Common



Medications



Ethanol Intoxication





Intoxication With Drugs of Abuse



Intoxication



With Drugs Causing Metabolic Acidosis

ABNORMALITIES OF IONIC OR ACID-BASE ENVIRONMENT

OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM 251

Hypo-osmolar States



Hyperosmolar States





Calcium




Other


Electrolytes



Disorders of Systemic Acid-Base Balance



DISORDERS OF THERMOREGULATION 259

Hypothermia



Hyperthermia



INFECTIOUS DISORDERS OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS

SYSTEM: BACTERIAL 262

Acute Bacterial Leptomeningitis



Chronic Bacterial Meningitis



INFECTIOUS DISORDERS OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS

SYSTEM: VIRAL 266

Overview of Viral Encephalitis



Acute Viral Encephalitis







Yüklə 9,02 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   73




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə