Guidelines on methods for calculating contributions to dgs



Yüklə 0.84 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə7/8
tarix28.11.2016
ölçüsü0.84 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8

Practice 

Member 

State 

Category/ Indicator 

Weight 

Notes 

Differential 

weights 

determined by 

using expert 

judgement 

and/or by exact 

calibration 

DE 


Capital structure* 

35% 


DGS for cooperative banks 

Income structure* 

50% 

Risk structure* 



15% 

Qualitative indicators

22

 

50% 



The statutory DGS for private 

banks 


Quantitative indicators 

including: 

Capital adequacy* 

Asset quality* 

Earning/profitability* 

Liquidity* 

Sensitivity to market risk* 

Management quality* 

 

4.91% 


10.45% 

4.55% 


14.54% 

6.65% 


8.90% 

IT 


Capital adequacy 

 

Different weights for 



indicators with time-series 

data. The more recent the 

data are, the higher the 

weight they take  

Liquidity 

Asset quality 

Profitability ratio (x2) 

Equal weights for 

all risk indicators 

FI 


Capital adequacy ratio 

100% 


Single indicator 

FR 


Solvency ratio 

25% 


 

Uncovered exposure ratio 

25% 

 

Maturity transformation ratio 



25% 

 

Operating ratio 



25% 

 

PT 



Core tier 1 ratio 

100% 


Single indicator 

SE 


Capital adequacy ratio 

100% 


Single indicator 

 

*Risk category that includes different indicators. 



 

Risk classification 

The current practices across DGSs that apply risk-based contributions rely on two types of risk 

classification. While in some Member States (FI, NO,  SE)  a  ‘sliding scale’  is used, some other 

Member States (DE, FR, IT, PT) operate a ‘bucket’ approach. The main difference between the two 

models is that the former applies continuous scale and the latter measures the risk of the 

institutions on a discrete scale.  

Risk classes 

Where the Member States use discrete scaling (for example,  the  ‘bucket’  approach) for the 

classification of risk, they set a number of risk classes under which the institutions are classified 

given their risk profiles. Currently, there are Member States (DE) that use a large number of risk 

classes while some other Member States (FR, IT, PT)  set a smaller number of risk classes to 

identify the risk level of the institutions. As mentioned above, there are also Member States 

                                                                                                               

22

 Qualitative indicators are based on the external ratings with a focus on deposit taking behavior. 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



51 

(FI, NO, SE) that use a sliding scale. Table 4 indicates the number of risk classes for a sub-sample 

of Member States. 

Table 4 Number of risk classes used in a sub-sample of Member States 



Risk classification 

Member State 

No. of risk classes  

Discrete scale (i.e. bucket approach) 

DE

23



 

FR, PT 



IT, NL 




Continuous scale (i.e. sliding scale approach) 

FI, NO, SE 

N/A 

Risk weights 



The range for the risk weights assigned to risk classes falls between 60% and 350% and the core 

range of risk weights is between 75% and 150%.

24

 Most Member States [BE, DE, FI, FR, IT, NL, NO, 



PT, SE] apply a narrow range of risk weights that may lead to cross-subsidisation relative to actual 

difference in risk between the  most and the  least risky institutions. In Germany,  the DGS for 

cooperative banks applies a range of 80%-140% while the statutory DGS applies a range of 75%-

200%. In Italy, the DGS additional risk factor ranges between -24% and +24%. In Sweden, where 

the DGS does not apply risk categories but a sliding scale, the floor is 6 and the cap is 14 basis 

points. 


Technical options 

This section provides an assessment of the options considered under a set of policy areas 

including: 

A.

 



Specification of risk indicators 

B.

 



Selection of risk categories and core risk indicators 

C.

 



Weights of risk categories / indicators 

D.

 



Risk classification  

E.

 



Models for calculating contributions (calculation formula). 

Under each sub-section technical options will be presented first, followed by a discussion of their 

potential advantages and disadvantages. 

 

A.



 

Specification of risk indicators 

                                                                                                               

23

 This is the statutory DGS for private banks. 



24

 Calculating risk-based contributions for a DGS: Result of the EFDI Research Working group, June 2014. 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



52 

Option 1a: an exhaustive list of risk indicators 

Option 1a is to include in the guidelines one calculation model with a set of indicators that all 

national DGSs have to comply with. This option would ensure the highest level of harmonisation. 

Under this option, the weights assigned to risk indicators would also be fixed and national DGSs 

would not be able to include any additional risk indicators into their  calculation methods. This 

approach would ensure that exactly the same indicators and the same approach are used when 

calculating risk-based contributions to DGSs. Moreover, it may increase certainty among the 

member institutions about factors that will be taken into consideration for the purposes of DGS 

contributions. In addition, it would be easier for the national DGSs to implement the calculation 

model proposed in the guidelines as they would not be obliged to determine which indicators are 

the most relevant to reflect risk profiles of their member institutions. The main drawback of this 

approach is that risk-based contribution systems with an exhaustive list of core indicators may not 

accommodate the characteristics of the banking sectors that are peculiar to some Member States. 

This may result in calculation methodology that is inappropriate for certain banking sectors. This 

option may be too rigid to achieve the objectives of these guidelines. 

Option 1b: a generic list of indicators 

This option introduces no compulsory core risk indicators for calculating contributions but 

establishes general guidance for national DGSs on what has to be taken into consideration when 

developing the models. This option gives national DGSs full flexibility in choosing risk indicators 

and distributing weights among them. This option would help to ensure that the method for 

calculation of contributions duly takes into account specific characteristics of the national banking 

sectors and various business models. However, this  option is expected to fail to address the 

problems related to  an  uneven playing field. Furthermore, it does not effectively achieve the 

objectives of harmonisation and fails to establish a framework where the DGSs across the Union 

follow common and consistent approach to calculating risk-based contributions. In addition, this 

approach would not guarantee that some indicators that are crucial for the calculation of risk-

based contributions are given an appropriate importance in calculating the DGSs contributions.       

Option 1c: a list of core risk indicators and rules for adding additional indicators   

Under this option,  the  guidelines  would outline core risk indicators and allow flexibility to add 

new indicators to the calculation method (within the pre-defined risk categories and complying 

with rules on assigning weights to risk indicators). This approach would ensure that the core 

indicators play a leading  role in calculating DGS contributions and that member institutions in 

various Member States are treated in a similar way. At the same time, this option allows national 

DGSs to incorporate into the method additional risk indicators in order to better accommodate 

the characteristics of their national banking sectors. This option would ensure that fundamental 

indicators are taken into account, while leaving room for flexibility to address issues which are 

peculiar to some Member States only. This option seems to combine the advantages of the two 

options discussed above. 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



53 

Taking into account the argumentation presented above,  Option 1c has been selected as the 

preferred option. 

B.

 



Selection of risk categories and core risk indicators 

The selection of risk categories and core risk indicators is based mostly on the analysis of the 

baseline scenario and Member States’ responses to the survey accompanying the EBA test 

exercise  on three different test systems for calculating risk-based contributions, which was 

conducted from February to April 2014. 

The three test systems were developed by the EBA with a view to allowing  Member States to 

assess how different combinations of necessary elements of calculation methods could be applied 

in their national banking sectors. Each of the three test systems used a fixed set of indicators (4, 6 

and 9 respectively) and proposed calibration of thresholds for these indicators. The test systems 

were accompanied by an Excel application (enabling Member States to calculate aggregate risk 

weights for the sample of institutions) and with a survey on the results of calculations (where 

respondents were asked to express their views on various elements of the calculation systems - 

including the choice of risk indicators).  

Approximately 80% of all respondents to the survey (in total 24 Member States

25

 responded) 



expressed specific views on at least one risk indicator included in the test exercise. The remaining 

respondents provided more general comments on indicators. Some of the indicators proposed in 

the test exercise received wide support from respondents (for example, NPL ratio, Liquid assets / 

Total  assets) whereas dissenting views were expressed on other indicators (for example,  Core 

earnings, Balance sheet growth ratio). The respondents also suggested adding to the calculation 

method some specific indicators (for example, LCR, NSFR) which could not be included in the test 

exercise due to lack of data; these ratios are based on new regulatory requirements and reporting 

obligations were not yet in place when the test exercise took place. Table 5 presents a summary 

of the findings from the answers to the survey. 

                                                                                                               

25

 AT, CY, CZ, DE, DK, EE, EL, ES, FI, FR, HU, HR, IE, LU, LT, LV, MT, NL, NO, PL, PT, SE, SI, UK 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



54 

 

Table 5 Overview of responses to the EBA Survey on DGS contributions 



Risk 

categories 

Core indicators 

proposed in 

the guidelines  

Indicators 

used in DGS 

test exercise 

Feedback  

from Member States  

to the test exercise 

Conclusions 

Capital 

CET1/RWA  

or capital 

coverage ratio 

Tier 1 / RWA*  Only one respondent stated 

that capital adequacy is not a 

strong risk indicator.   

CET 1, as a new and more 

conservative capital 

adequacy measure (in 

comparison to the Tier 1 

ratio), was included in the 

guidelines among core risk 

indicators.  

National DGSs can replace 

the CET1 ratio with the 

capital coverage ratio.     

Leverage ratio 

N/A 


Suggestions to include this 

indicator in the calculation 

method. 

This ratio was included in 

the core indicators.   

Liquidity and 

funding 

Liquid assets / 

Total assets 

Liquid assets / 

Total assets* 

No concerns regarding the 

usefulness of the indicator.  

Differences in national 

definitions of liquid assets.  

This indicator will be used 

on a temporary basis until 

fully harmonised EU 

definition of LCR is 

implemented.    

LCR 

N/A 


Suggestions to include this 

indicator in the calculation 

method. 

This ratio was included in 

the core indicators.   

NSFR 


N/A 

Suggestions to include this 

indicator in the calculation 

method. 


This ratio was included in 

the core indicators.   

Asset quality  NPL ratio 

NPL ratio* 

No concerns regarding the 

usefulness of the indicator. 

However, some comments 

received indicating lack of 

comparability in defining NPLs 

across the Union.   

This ratio was included in 

the core indicators.   

Business 

model and 

management 

RWA / Total 

assets 

RWA / Total 



assets† 

The vast majority of 

comments on this indicator 

recommended its use.  

One respondent pointed out 

unequal treatment of 

institutions using the IRB and 

STA approach for credit risk.  

This ratio was included in 

the core indicators, with a 

possibility to use different 

calibration for institutions 

using advanced methods 

(for example, IRB) or 

standardised methods for 

calculating minimum own 

funds requirements.       

RoA 


Core 

earnings* 

Some respondents expressed 

critical views on Core earning 

indicator as inappropriate for 

various business models.  

Core earnings ratio included 

only in the examples of 

additional risk indicators.   

Instead, the RoA ratio was 

included in the list of core 

indicators because this 

measure of profitability can 

be applied more universally 

among institutions.    


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



55 

Risk 

categories 

Core indicators 

proposed in 

the guidelines  

Indicators 

used in DGS 

test exercise 

Feedback  

from Member States  

to the test exercise 

Conclusions 

 

N/A 



Interest 

expenses / 

Interest 

bearing 


liabilities† 

Divided opinions among 

respondents on the usefulness 

of this risk indicator.  

This ratio was not included 

in the guidelines.   

N/A 

Total loans / 



Total 

deposits


 

Divided opinions among 



respondents on the usefulness 

of this risk indicator.  

This ratio was not included 

in the guidelines.   

N/A 

Balance sheet 



growth

 



Divided opinions among 

respondents on the usefulness 

of this risk indicator. 

Only excessive growth should 

be considered as risky.  

This ratio was included only 

in the examples of additional 

risk indicators.   

N/A 

Qualitative 



indicators 

based on 

supervisory / 

external 

rating



 



The majority of comments 

supported the use of 

qualitative indicators 

reflecting the management.  

Some concerns were 

expressed about the 

confidentiality of supervisory 

information and the 

availability of external ratings.      

The indicator was included 

in the examples of additional 

indicators. It is not 

obligatory and can be used 

in the calculation methods 

subject to data availability 

and lack of confidentiality 

problems. External ratings 

can be used as the 

additional indicator if they 

are available for all member 

institutions of the particular 

DGS.     

Potential use 

of DGS funds 

Unencumbered 

assets / 

Covered 

deposits  

N/A 

Many respondents 



recommended the use asset 

encumbrance ratio since it 

directly influences the 

potential loss of the DGS. 

One respondent 

recommended to use an 

enhanced version of this ratio 

– i.e. Unencumbered assets / 

Covered deposits because it 

better reflects which part of 

the pay-out (for covered 

deposits) the DGS can recover 

from the unencumbered 

assets of the institution.    

The ratio was included in the 

core indicators.   

 

Notes: Result of the survey accompanying the EBA test exercise on DGSs. 



*Indicator is used in all three test systems;  

†Indicator is used in systems two and three;  

 Indicator is used in system three only. 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



56 

The baseline scenario and the results of the survey show that there is a common set of indicators 

(which may be grouped into risk categories) that the national DGSs currently use or consider 

necessary to use in the future for calculating DGS contributions. In addition, the text of 

Directive 2014/49/EU  provides that the calculation methods ‘may take into account […] risk 

indicators including capital adequacy, asset quality and liquidity’. On the other hand, the 

European framework of (SREP, which is equivalent to the CAMELS approach, envisages that the 

comprehensive assessment of the institutions’ risk profile should cover the following four areas: 

capital adequacy, liquidity and funding, business model and strategy, and internal governance and 

institution-wide controls. The risk categories were selected in order to ensure that a sufficiently 

wide spectrum of institution’s activities is taken into account when assessing the risk profile and 

that all crucial areas are reflected in the calculation method. At the same time, it was necessary to 

include  only these risk categories that would be applicable to institutions of various business 

models across the Union. Finally, apart from the risk categories reflecting the likelihood of 

institution failure, it was important to include also an additional risk category which reflects the 

potential loss of the DGS. Taking into account all the considerations mentioned above, Table 6 

presents the risk categories and core risk indicators included in the guidelines. 

Table 6 Risk categories and core indicators proposed in the guidelines  



Risk category 

Core risk indicators 

Capital 

- Capital coverage ratio or CET 1 

- Leverage ratio 

Liquidity and funding 

- LCR 


- NSFR 

Asset quality 

- NPL ratio 



Business model and management 

- RWA / Total assets 

- Return on assets (RoA)  

Potential losses for the DGS  

- Unencumbered assets / Covered deposits 

C.

 

Weights for risk categories / indicators 



Option 3a: equal weights for all risk indicators or categories 

The choice of applying equal weights to all risk indicators / categories would be a simple approach 

from an operational viewpoint. However, this would translate into  assigning the same relative 

importance to all risk indicators, while their significance vis-à-vis the risk posed to the DGS could 

vary.  

Option 3b: different weights for risk categories / indicators  



In contrast to equal weights, differentiated weights could better reflect the varying significance of 

various risk indicators or categories. On the other hand, the assessment of this option depends on 

how to determine that differentiation (i.e. either by expert judgement, exact calibration based on 

historical data or a combination of these two approaches). 

Option 3b.i: different weights determined by exact calibration only 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



57 

This option may increase the predictive power of a model for calculating DGS contributions and 

ensure that the weights assigned to particular risk indicators represent  on the probability that 

the institution will  fail. Nevertheless, in order to conduct necessary statistical analysis it is 

essential to have historical data about failures of institutions and the values of the risk indicators 

from previous reporting periods. The number of failed institutions in a given period may not be 

large enough for the results of this analysis to be statistically significant. Moreover, with regard to 

a few risk indicators proposed in the draft guidelines the historical data is not available because 

they reflect new regulatory requirements which have not been measured or reported in the past. 

In any case, the results of the statistical analysis would need to be verified by applying expert 

judgement.  

Option 3b.ii: different weights determined by expert judgment only 

This option would be the easiest to apply and there would not be  problems related to data 

availability. However, three drawbacks with this option might be: (i) lack of transparency in the 

decision-making under which some institutions may benefit from a particular weight structure in 

terms of lower contributions with respect to their risk levels; (ii) the autonomy of the DGS may be 

influenced by the competent authorities; and (iii) where full flexibility in specifying weights of risk 

categories / indicators is left to national DGSs, the degree of harmonisation may be relatively low 

and the option may fail to address the identified problems. 

Option 3b.iii: different weights determined by expert judgement with the possibility of revising 

the results if the statistical data becomes available  

An alternative option is to specify weights for risk categories by applying expert judgement and, at 

a later stage, when reviewing the EBA guidelines, revise the proposed weights on the basis of the 

statistical analysis of historical data. The proposed weights should be based on the supervisory 

judgement and will be re-calibrated by the EBA by 3 July 2017 as part of the first review of the 

guidelines on DGSs contributions, according to Article 13(3) of Directive 2014/49/EU, and at least 

every 5 years after this date. This option  is expected to be  a feasible and  effective  way of 

achieving the objectives of the guidelines; it is thus selected as the preferred option. 

D.

 

Risk classification 



In order to calculate the aggregate risk weight (ARW) for each institution the aggregate risk score 

(ARS) shall be assigned for the purpose of classifying institutions according to their risk profiles. 

Two different approaches are set within the guidelines, which ought to be selected by each DGS 

having taken into consideration the characteristics of the national banking sector. The DGSs 

should also choose the appropriate calculation method after having considered all the relevant 

advantages and disadvantages associated with them. 

 

Option 4a: discrete scale (the ‘bucket’ approach) 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



58 

The first method considered for purposes of risk classification is to use a discrete scale (i.e. the 

‘bucket’ approach). This method would have the advantage of setting incentives for banks to 

move between buckets in order to be classified in a more favourable way. However, this would 

carry the disadvantage of potential significant cliff-edge effects, with relatively similar institutions 

treated in a very different way. In addition, the calibration of buckets may be a difficult task. 

Option 4b: continuous scale (the ‘sliding scale’ approach) 

The second method considered for purposes of risk classification is to use a continuous scale 

(which would not require setting buckets). Such a method would carry the advantage of allowing 

for  extensive  differentiation among institutions, which is particularly helpful if there is a  high 

degree of heterogeneity among institutions. This advantage is partially counterbalanced by the 

complexity of calibrating this method for a large number of institutions.  

Taking into account the merits of the ‘bucket’  approach and the ‘sliding  scale’  approach, 

depending on characteristics of the national banking sector, the preferred option is to include in 

the draft guidelines the flexibility to choose either of these approaches.      

Calibration of boundaries used for risk indicators 

Both in the  ‘bucket’  approach and the ‘sliding scale’  approach, the calibration of boundaries 

established for mapping values of risk indicators to IRS has a significant influence on the risk 

differentiation achieved by the calculation method. Therefore, it is crucial to establish these 

boundaries by setting thresholds at levels which appropriately reflect differences between risk 

profiles of member institutions. Wrong calibration of boundaries may result in assigning the same 

IRS to member institutions,  despite significant discrepancies in their risk profiles, and 

consequently hinder the risk differentiation offered by this calculation method.  

Given existing differences in banking business models and structures across Member States, as 

well as various accounting standards, at this stage it does not appear feasible to establish in the 

guidelines specific thresholds for boundaries for each core risk indicator. Harmonised boundaries 

set at EU level could have very different consequences across national banking sectors, or even 

DGSs, with very different memberships (for example, sectors with a lot of small banks, or DGSs 

with fewer members). Therefore, at this stage, instead of proposing a harmonised Union-wide 

calibration of thresholds for the core risk indicators, the guidelines  introduce a general 

requirement for DGSs or competent authorities to define boundaries for risk indicators to ensure 

meaningful differentiation of DGS members depending on their riskiness, taking into account the 

regulatory requirements applicable to the member institutions and historical data on indicators’ 

values. The guidelines also stipulate that DGSs should avoid calibrating the boundaries in such a 

way that all member institutions, despite representing significant differences in the area 

measured by a particular risk indicator, would be classified into the same bucket (if using the 

‘bucket’ approach) or fall outside the lower/upper boundary (if using the ‘sliding scale’ approach). 

E.

 

Models for calculating contributions (calculation formula) 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



59 

The objective of the assessment is to find an optimal model to calculate risk-based contributions 

to DGSs. This sub-section offers two models and illustrates their features with examples. 

Assumptions for the illustration 

For the purpose of the illustration the calculations are carried out for a Member State A in year 

2X01 and the amount of total covered deposits under DGS is EUR 1.5 million. 

It is assumed that year 2X01 is the first year when the DGS in Member State A starts collecting ex-

ante  contributions from deposit taking institutions in order to reach a target level of 0.8% of 

covered deposits in 10 years (i.e. by year 2X11). Therefore, in line with the requirement to spread 

contributions as evenly as possible, the annual target level, representing annual total 

contributions  (C)  from all institutions in the Member State A  in year 2X01, should reach 

approximately 1/10 of the target level, which should be calculated as follows: 

TC = EUR 1,500,000 x (0.1 x 0.008) = EUR 1,500,000 x (0.0008) = EUR 1,200 

 

Table 7 shows the breakdown of the total covered deposits and the respective risk-unadjusted 



contributions by these institutions. 

Table 7 Covered deposits and risk-unadjusted contributions by institutions in Member State A in 

year 2X01 

Institution 

Covered deposits (EUR) 

Risk-unadjusted contributions (EUR) 

Institution 1 

 

 



Institution 2 

 

 



Institution 3 

 

 



Total 

 

 



The method for calculating risk-based contributions adopted in Member State   uses four 

different risk classes, with different aggregate risk weights (ARW) assigned to each risk class as 

follows: 75% for the institution with lowest risk profile, 100% for institutions with the average risk 

profile, 120% for risky institutions, and 150% for the most risky institutions. 

The assumptions apply to both models and all scenarios. 

Option 6a: multiplicative model 

The multiplicative model for institution ‘i’ in Member State A in a given year 2X01 is defined as: 

  (1) 


where: 

 



Annual contribution of a member institution ‘i’; 

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



60 

 



Contribution rate; 

  = 


Aggregate risk weight for institution ‘i’;  

 

=  



Covered deposits of institution ‘i’; and 

 



Adjustment coefficient. 

Notice that µ does not have ‘i’ subscript therefore it is constant, i.e. the same for all institutions in 

a given year. As the illustration shows, in practice the adjustment coefficient µ will be used to 

reach the annual target level. µ = 1 if the sum of annual contributions equals the annual target 

level.     

Scenario 1: relatively high-risk institutions in year 2X01 

Under Scenario 1, after applying only the risk-adjusting factor, the amount of total contributions 

from all institutions in Member State A  (EUR  1,464) is higher than the planned total annual 

contribution level (EUR 1,200). Table 8 shows the estimates. 

Table 8 Risk-adjusted contributions by high-risk institutions in Member State A in year 2X01 



Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted contributions (EUR) 

Institution 1 

 

 



 

Institution 2 

 

 



 

Institution 3 

 

 



 

Total 

 

 



 

Therefore, there is a need to use the adjustment coefficient µ  to ensure that the total annual 

contribution (i.e. the sum of all individual contributions) equals 1/10 of the target level. In this 

case, the adjustment coefficient to be applied for all institutions can be calculated as µ



1

 = EUR 


1,200 / EUR 1,464 = 0.82. Table 9 shows the estimates for risk-adjusted contributions after the 

application of the adjustment coefficient µ



1

Table 9 Corrected risk-adjusted contributions by high-risk institutions in Member State A in year 



2X01 

Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted 

contributions 

(EUR) 

Adjustment 

coefficient µ

i

 

Final risk-adjusted 

contributions (EUR) 

Institution 1 

 

 



 

 

 



Institution 2 

 

 



 

 

 



Institution 3 

 

 



 

 

 



Total 

 

 



 

 

 



Scenario 2: relatively low-risk institutions in year 2X01 

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



61 

Under Scenario 2, when  just the  risk-adjusting factor is applied, the total contribution from all 

institutions in the Member State A  is  EUR  1,044 and it is lower than the planned total annual 

contribution of EUR 1,200, as shown in Table 10. 

Table 10 Risk-adjusted contributions by low-risk institutions in Member State   in year 2X01 

Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted contributions (EUR) 

Institution 1 

 

 



 

Institution 2 

 

 



 

Institution 3 

 

 



 

Total 

 

 



 

The adjustment coefficient µ  is applied in order to ensure that the total annual contribution 

equals 1/10 of the target level. Under this scenario, the adjustment coefficient to be applied for 

all institutions can be calculated as µ



2

 = EUR 1,200 / EUR 1,044 = 1.15. Because the sum of the 

risk-adjusted contributions is lower than the threshold, the adjustment coefficient is greater than 

1 and increases the contribution by each institution. Table 11 presents the calculations. 

Table 11 Corrected risk-adjusted contributions by low-risk institutions in Member State A in year 

2X01 


Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted 

contributions 

(EUR) 

Adjustment 

coefficient µ

i

 

Final risk-adjusted 

contributions (EUR) 

Institution 1 

 

 



 

 

 



Institution 2 

 

 



 

 

 



Institution 3 

 

 



 

 

 



Total 

 

 



 

 

 



Option 6b: additive model 

The additive model for institution ‘i’ in Member State A and for a given year 2X01 is defined as: 

 

(2) 


where: 

 



Annual contribution from a member institution ‘i’; 

 

=  



Flat rate; 

 

=  



Covered deposits of a member institution ‘i’; 

 



Contribution rate; and 

  = 


Aggregate risk weight of a member institution ‘i’. 

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



62 

Note that FR  and  CR  do not have ‘i’  subscript  as  they are constant. These parameters  can  be 

calibrated to reach the global threshold for the total contributions. For simplicity, the following 

scenarios use the initial value of 60% for FR and of 40% for CR. 

Scenario 1: relatively high-risk institutions in year 2X01 

Under Scenario 1, after applying only the risk-adjusting factor, the amount of total contributions 

from all institutions in the Member State A (EUR 1,306) is higher than the planned total annual 

contribution level (EUR 1,200) (Table 12). 

Table 12 Risk-adjusted contributions by high-risk institutions in Member State A in year 2X01 

Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted contributions (EUR): 

[(60% x 0.0008 x CD

i

) + (40% x 0.0008 x CD



x ARW



)]   

Institution 1 

 

 



 

Institution 2 

 

 



 

Institution 3 

 

 



 

Total 

 

 



 

It is then possible to adjust the flat rate (FR) and keep the contribution rate (CR) fixed in order to 

ensure that the total annual contribution level equals 1/10 of the target level of EUR 1,200. For 

instance,  if  CR  = 40%  and C = EUR 1,200, then FR must equal 51.23%. The adjusted values for 

contributions are presented in Table 13. 

 

Table 13 Corrected risk-adjusted contributions by high-risk institutions in MS A in year 2X01 



Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted contributions (EUR): 

[(51.23% x 0.0008 x CD

i

) + (40% x 0.0008 x CD



x ARW



)]   

Institution 1 

 

 



 

Institution 2 

 

 



 

Institution 3 

 

 



 

Total 

 

 



 

Scenario 2: relatively low-risk institutions in year 2X01 

Under Scenario 2,  after applying only the  risk-adjusting factor, the aggregate value of the 

contributions from all institutions in the Member State A (EUR 1,138) is lower than the planned 

total annual contribution level (EUR 1,200). The results are presented in Table 14. 

Table 14 Risk-adjusted contributions by low-risk institutions in Member State   in year 2X01 



Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted contributions (EUR): 

[(60% x 0.0008 x CD

i

) + (40% x 0.0008 x CD



x ARW



)]   

Institution 1 

 

 



 

Institution 2 

 

 



 

Institution 3 

 

 



 

Total 

 

 



 

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



63 

 

As in the example above, in order to comply with the global cap the fixed rate must be adjusted. If 



the CR = 40% and C = EUR 1,200, then FR must be set to 65.16%, as shown in Table 15. 

Table 15 Risk-adjusted contributions by low-risk institutions in Member State A in year 2X01 



Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted contributions (EUR): 

[(65.16% x 0.0008 x CD

i

) + (40% x 0.0008 x CD



x ARW



)]   

Institution 1 

 

 



 

Institution 2 

 

 



 

Institution 3 

 

 



 

Total 

 

 



 

 

As illustrated by examples in the two scenarios, the multiplicative model seems to deliver more 



balanced results than the additive model. Furthermore, the multiplicative model is simpler, since 

it does not require any specific weight to be set in order to balance the flat rate and the 

contribution rate. In both cases calculation results do need to be adjusted in order to reach the 

annual target level. However, under the multiplicative model all parameters are multiplied by the 

contribution rate, not only the risk-adjusted part, thus delivering more smoothed contributions. 

 

 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



64 

 

4.2



 

Views of the Banking Stakeholder Group (BSG) 

Overall, the BSG supports the aims of the guidelines and underlines the importance of compulsory 

ex-ante  risk-based contributions to DGSs. The  BSG also supports  the option whereby  Member 

States  may provide for  lower contributions from  institutions in a regulated low-risk sector or 

those which are members of an IPS.    

However,  the  BSG stresses  that the calculation method must not result in  excessive reporting 

requirements for institutions. Additionally, the BSG emphasises that even though transparency is 

important, it is vital that the risk classification of institutions is not revealed to anyone other than 

the institutions themselves.  

The BSG finds that the proposed level of detail is appropriate to achieve sufficient harmonisation. 

It  also  supports  the level of discretionary power  in the guidelines  for  adjustment  to specific 

characteristics of national banking sectors.    

The BSG finds the calculation formula to be sufficiently clear and transparent. However, in order 

to guarantee the protection of deposits, it suggests that the adjustment factor, µ, should only be 

used after the 0.8% target is met.  

The BSG supports the proposed minimum risk interval (75-150%). It also agrees to retaining the 

option  of  widening  this  interval,  if  national DGSs find it appropriate,  in order to capture 

institutions’ diverse risk profiles.  

On the risk indicators, the BSG does not have any specific views but once again stresses that the 

calculation method should not lead to excessive additional reporting requirements.  The BSG 

therefore emphasises  that formal arrangements should  be  in place to provide the necessary 

information.   

The BSG favours the use of the CET1 ratio as a core capital indicator. 

As regards the treatment of IPSs, the  BSG suggests  an alternative approach  to  calculating 

contributions. Central institutions in IPSs typically hold very small amounts of covered deposits 

and thus the true risk that they pose to the IPS system as a whole will not be reflected in their 

contribution if covered deposits are the base for  calculations. Therefore, the  BSG suggests 

including  in the guideline a section that regulates the ‘alternative own risk-based method’, 

allowed for in Directive  2014/49/EU. This would allow IPSs that are recognised as  DGSs in 

accordance with Article 1(2)(c) of Directive 2014/49/EU to adjust contribution calculations with 

regard to the specific  risk characteristics of their system. The  BSG  therefore  suggests  that IPSs 

should be allowed to use the amount of RWA (instead of covered deposits) as a calculation base. 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



65 

The BSG considers  that more guidance for  calibrating thresholds,  etc. for risk indicators is not 

necessary. Since the calibration is complex and requires careful measurement, the BSG suggests 

that supervisors include the measurement of calibration into their supervisory schedule.  

The BSG agrees with the analysis presented in the impact assessment. 

EBA feedback on the BSG’s opinion 

The EBA welcomes the opinion of the BSG and provides feedback on the main points raised by the 

group in the following section, together with the feedback on the public consultation. 

 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



66 

 

4.3



 

Feedback on the public consultation  

The EBA publicly consulted on the draft proposal contained in this paper. The consultation period 

lasted for 3 months and ended on 11 February 2015. The EBA received 31 responses, of which 9 

were confidential and were not published on the EBA website.  

This paper presents a summary of the key points and other comments arising from the 

consultation, the analysis and discussion triggered by these comments and the actions taken to 

address them, if deemed necessary.  

In many cases,  several industry bodies made similar comments or the same body repeated its 

comments in the response to different questions. In such cases, the comments, and EBA analysis 

are included in the section of this paper where EBA considers them most appropriate. 

Changes to the guidelines have been incorporated as a result of the responses received during the 

public consultation. 

Summary of key issues and the EBA’s response  

There is overall support for the draft guidelines including the calculation formula. The main points 

raised by the respondents with regard to the draft guidelines are as follows: 

 

Steps towards harmonised practices 

Most respondents welcome the initiative to promote  harmonised practices on risk-based 

contributions to DGSs across Member States. In particular, respondents support the mandatory 



ex-ante  collection of contributions which they think  will strengthen confidence in DGSs across 

Member States. However, due to the variety of national banking structures throughout the Union, 

respondents insist on  there being sufficient degree of flexibility to accommodate the specific 

characteristics of those structures as far as possible.    

The EBA acknowledges the difficulty of developing a methodology which will cater for the specific 

features of banking structures of all Member States. Taking the views of the respondents into 

account, the EBA determined  that the level of flexibility allowed in the current draft of the 

guidelines is sufficient.  



Institutional protection schemes (IPS) 

Some respondents stated that the guidelines  do not appropriately reflect the specific 

characteristics  of IPSs. In particular, the formula of the guidelines  does not allow sufficient 

flexibility for IPSs since it is based predominately on covered deposits. Respondents thought the 

guidelines should better reflect elements which are important for the IPS structure. 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



67 

The EBA acknowledges  that the guidelines  should be amended to take into account important 

features of IPSs (for example,  their  business model and risk profile). More specifically, the 

proposed method allows IPSs recognised as DGSs to use an extended formula to ensure that 

central entities systemic to the IPS contribute according to the risk they pose to the scheme. It is 

for competent authorities to assess, as part of the approval procedure, whether the introduction 

of the additional factor is commensurate with the risk of having to intervene in order to prevent 

the failure of institutions beyond the protection of covered deposits. This possibility is not 

restricted only to IPSs. Other schemes, provided the above-mentioned conditions are met, are 

allowed to exercise this option as well. 

 

Risk categories/indicators  

In general, there is wide support for the proposed composition of core risk indicators. However, 

some respondents raised concerns that:  

(i)


 

there is no universal definition of the NPL ratio and argued that this could undermine 

the aim of harmonised implementation across Member States;  

(ii)


 

the leverage ratio should not be used as it is a non-risk-weighted measure that does not 

take into account the riskiness of the institution. Some respondents suggested removing 

it entirely and argued that the other risk-weighted capital ratios must be given more 

prominence in the model;  

(iii)


 

instead of using the RoA measure, a couple of respondents suggest to use RoE because 

it better reflects the institution’s capacity to restore capital levels;  

(iv)


 

using RWAs will favour banks that use the IRB-approach and disfavour banks that use 

the standardised approach when calculating RWA.  

Ahead of the consultation, the EBA performed a test exercise in which Member States had an 

opportunity to comment on potential risk indicators. The indicators were to a large extent based 

on indicators currently used by Member State with risk-based contributions already in place. The 

vast majority of responses to the test exercise accepted the proposed indicators. Furthermore, 

indicators used in these guidelines are also, to a large extent, consistent with the risk indicators in 

the Delegated Act on contributions to resolution financing arrangements.  

Finally,  some stakeholders were concerned that there is ambiguity on how to apply the 

adjustment factor µ, in order to avoid pro-cyclicality in contributions. In particular, respondents 

found it unclear who should determine the business cycle.  

The final guidelines provide that the cyclical adjustment should take into account the risk analysis 

undertaken by the relevant designated macroprudential authorities.  

The guidelines preserve flexibility for Member States to determine whether macroprudential 

authority’s approval is necessary when setting lower or higher contributions, or whether 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



68 

macroprudential authority must merely be consulted, either on  its own or as part of a wider 

consultation with other financial safety net participants.  

 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



69 

Summary of responses to the consultation and the EBA’s analysis  

 

Comments 



Summary of responses received 

EBA analysis 

Amendments to the 

proposals 

Responses to questions in Consultation Paper EBA/CP/2014/35  

Question 1. Do you have 

any general comments on 

the draft guidelines on 

methods for calculating 

contributions to DGSs? 



Harmonisation: 

Most of respondents welcome the EBA Draft guidelines. 

Five of them emphasised that the guidelines will be a 

considerable step towards the harmonisation of 

practices of national deposit guarantee schemes.  

 

The EBA appreciates this positive 



feedback from respondents. 

 

 



No amendment 

 

 



Flexibility:  

Although, almost all respondents acknowledged the 

overall goal of harmonisation of the guidelines, nine 

respondents argued for more flexibility to allow the risk-

based method to reflect specific characteristics of 

national banking structures.  

 

The EBA acknowledges the difficulty of 



developing a methodology which will 

cater to the specific features of banking 

structures of all Member States. Taking 

the views of the respondents into 

account, the EBA determined that the 

level of flexibility allowed in the current 

draft of the guidelines is sufficient.  

 

No amendment 



 

 

 



Nine respondents stated that DGSs may use their own 

risk-based calculation methods to determine (and 

calculate) the risk-based contributions.  

Two respondents argued that the guidelines do not fully 

allow for the option presented in Article 13(2) of 

Directive 2014/49/EU. 

According to Art. 13(3) of Directive 

2014/49/EU, the aim of the guidelines is 

to ensure consistent application of 

Directive 2014/49/EU. Own risk-based 

methods can be used, provided that they 

are in line with the principles and 

methodology of the guidelines.  

The EBA refers to the results of the second 

transition workshop on Directive 

2014/49/EU where the European 

No amendment 

 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



70 

Comments 

Summary of responses received 

EBA analysis 

Amendments to the 

proposals 

Commission clarified that Article 13(1) of 

Directive 2014/49/EU is the general rule, 

and Article 13(2) of Directive 2014/49/EU 

is subordinated. 

 

Eight respondents wrote that the guidelines do not 



appropriately reflect the specific characteristics of IPSs. 

In particular, the formula of the guidelines does not 

allow sufficient flexibility for an IPS since it is based 

predominately on covered deposits. Respondents 

thought the guidelines should better reflect elements 

which are important for the IPS structure. 

 

The EBA agrees that the guidelines have 



to be amended to take into account 

important features of IPSs (for example, 

business model and the risk profile). More 

specifically, the proposed method allows 

IPSs recognised as DGSs to use an 

extended formula to ensure that central 

entities with low levels of covered 

deposits, but systemic to the IPS, 

contribute accordingly to the risk they 

pose to the scheme.   

 

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə