Guidelines on methods for calculating contributions to dgs



Yüklə 0.84 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə4/8
tarix28.11.2016
ölçüsü0.84 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8

Table 2. Minimum weights for risk categories and core risk indicators 

Risk categories and core risk indicators 

Minimum 

weights 


1. Capital 

18% 

1.1.


 

Leverage ratio 

9% 

1.2.


 

Capital coverage ratio or CET1 ratio  

9% 

2. Liquidity and funding 

18% 

2.1. LCR 

9% 

2.2. NSFR  



9% 

3. Asset quality 

13% 

3.1 NPL ratio 

13% 

4. Business model and management 

13% 

4.1. RWA / Total assets  

 

   


6.5% 

4.2. RoA 

6.5% 

5. Potential losses for the DGS  

13% 

5.1. Unencumbered assets / Covered deposits 

13% 

Sum 

75% 

 

57.



 

The sum of the minimum weights specified in these guidelines for risk categories and core risk 

indicators amounts to 75% of total weights. DGSs should distribute the remaining 25% among 

the risk categories laid down in Table 1. 

58.

 

The DGS should allocate the flexible 25% of weights by distributing them among the additional 



risk indicators and/or by increasing the minimum weights of the core risk indicators provided 

that the following conditions are met:  

-

 

the minimum weights of risk categories and core risk indicators are preserved; 



-

 

where only core risk indicators are used in the calculation method,  the flexible 25% 



weight should be allocated among the risk categories in the following way: ‘Capital’ - 24%; 

‘Liquidity and funding’ - 24%; ‘Asset quality’ - 18%; ‘Business model and management’ - 

17%; and ‘Potential use of DGS funds’ - 17%;  

-

 



the weight of any additional indicator, or the increase in the weight of a core risk 

indicator, should not be higher than 15%, except for additional qualitative risk indicators 

representing the outcome of a comprehensive assessment of the member institution’s 

risk profile and management (included in the risk category ‘Business model and 

management’) and cases specified in paragraph C1  59. O 

59.


 

 Where a core indicator is not used, the minimum weight of the remaining core indicator from 

the same risk category should amount to the full minimum weight for this risk category.  


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



24 

60.


 

Where there is only one core indicator in a category, and this core indicator is not used, it 

should be replaced by a proxy with the same minimum weight as the core indicator. 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



25 

Box 3 – Example of using the flexibility in assigning 25% weights among risk categories and core 

risk indicators    

Scenario 1 

All core risk indicators are used and no additional indicators are included in the calculation 

method. The flexible 25% of weights is distributed among core risk indicators in such a way that 

the proportions between minimum weights for risk categories and core risk indicators are 

retained (for example, additional weight for capital amounts to 6% = 25% × (18%/75%).   

Risk indicator 

Minimum 


weights 

(1) 


Flexible  

weights 


(2) 

Final  


weights 

(1) + (2) 



1. Capital 

18% 

 + 6% 

24% 

1.1.


 

Leverage ratio 

9% 

+ 3% 


12% 

1.2.


 

Capital coverage ratio

 or 

CET1 ratio 



9% 

+ 3% 


12% 

2. Liquidity and funding 

18% 

+ 6% 

24% 

2.1. LCR 

9% 

+ 3% 


12% 

2.2. NSFR  

9% 

+ 3% 


12% 

3. Asset quality 

13% 

 + 5% 

18% 

3.1 NPL ratio 

13% 

+ 5% 


18% 

4. Business model and management 

13% 

+ 4% 

17% 

4.1. RWA / Total assets  

 

   


6.5% 

+ 2% 


8.5% 

4.2. RoA 

6.5% 

+ 2% 


8.5% 

5. Potential losses for the DGS  

13% 

+ 4% 

17% 

5.1. Unencumbered assets / Covered deposits 

13% 

+ 4% 


17% 

Sum 

75% 

+ 25% 

100% 

 

Scenario 2 

One of the core risk indicators is not available (NSFR) during a transitional period and no 

additional risk indicators are included in the calculation method. The minimum weight assigned to 

the LCR ratio would amount to 18% - the total weight for the risk category ‘Liquidity and funding’ 

(9% + 9%) increased by further  6%  up to 24% -  the maximum weight for this category as per 

paragraph 57. The other weights would be distributed among the risk indicators in a similar way 

as under Scenario 1.     

Risk indicator 

Minimum 


weights 

(1) 


Flexible  

weights 


(2) 

Final  


weights 

(1) + (2) 



1. Capital 

18% 

+ 6% 

24% 

1.1.


 

Leverage ratio 

9% 

+ 3% 


12% 

1.2.


 

Capital coverage ratio

 or 

CET1 ratio 



9% 

+ 3% 


12% 

2. Liquidity and funding 

18% 

+ 6% 

24% 

2.1. LCR 

9% 

+ (6% + 9%) 



24% 

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



26 

2.2. NSFR 

9% 

- 9% 


N/A 

3. Asset quality 

13% 

+ 5% 

18% 

3.1 NPL ratio 

13% 

+ 5% 


18% 

4. Business model and management 

13% 

+ 4% 

17% 

4.1. RWA / Total assets  

 

   


6.5% 

+ 2% 


8.5% 

4.2. RoA 

6.5% 

+ 2% 


8.5% 

5. Potential losses for the DGS  

13% 

+ 4% 

17% 

5.1. Unencumbered assets / Covered deposits 

13% 

+ 4% 


17% 

Sum  

75% 

+ 25% 

100% 

 

Scenario 3 

All core risk indicators are used in the calculation method but the DGS would like to increase (by 

5%) the weight of one core indicator (‘Leverage ratio’) because it considers this indicator to be 

highly effective in predicting distress among its member institutions. Moreover, the DGS intends 

to include two additional risk indicators (one with a weight of 3% in the risk category ‘Asset 

quality’, and the second one with a weight of 5% in the risk category ‘Business model and 

management’). The remaining 12% of flexible weights will be distributed among all the other core 

risk indicators in such a way that preserves the relationship of the minimum weights assigned to 

these indicators.      

 

 

Risk indicator 



Minimum 

weights 


(1) 

Flexible  

weights 

(2) 


Final  

weights 


(1) + (2) 

1. Capital 

18% 

+ 5% 

+3% 

26% 

1.1.


 

Leverage ratio 

9% 

+ 5% 


 

14% 


1.2.

 

Capital coverage ratio



 or 

CET1 ratio 

9% 

 

+ 3% 



12% 

2. Liquidity and funding 

18% 

 

+ 3% 

21% 

2.1. LCR 

9% 

 

+ 1.5% 



10.5% 

2.2. NSFR 

9% 

 

+ 1.5% 



10.5% 

3. Asset quality 

13% 

+ 3% 

+ 2% 

18% 

3.1 NPL ratio 

13% 

 

+ 2% 



15% 

3.2. Additional risk indicator (1)  

N/A 

+ 3% 


 

3% 


4. Business model and management 

13% 

+ 5% 

+ 2% 

20% 

4.1. RWA / Total assets  

 

   


6.5% 

 

+ 1% 



7.5% 

4.2. RoA 

6.5% 

 

+ 1% 



7.5% 

4.3. Additional risk indicator (2) 

N/A 

+ 5%  


 

5% 


5. Potential losses for the DGS  

13% 

 

+ 2% 

15% 

5.1. Unencumbered assets / Covered deposits 

13% 

 

+ 2% 



15% 

Sum  

75% 

+ 13% 

+ 12%  

100% 

 

 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



27 

Scenario 4 

All core risk indicators are used in the calculation method but the DGS would also like to include 

additional five indicators (one indicator in risk categories ‘Capital’, ‘Asset quality’ and ‘Potential 

losses for the DGS’, and two indicators in risk category ‘Business model and management’). The 

weights assigned to risk indicators are presented in the last column in the table below.      

Risk indicator 

Minimum 


weights 

 

Flexible  



weights 

 

Final  



weights 

    


1. Capital 

18% 

+ 5% 

23% 

1.1.


 

Leverage ratio 

9% 

 

9% 



1.2.

 

Capital coverage ratio



 or 

CET1 ratio 

9% 

 

9% 



1.3.

 

Additional risk indicator (1) 



N/A 

+ 5% 


5% 

2. Liquidity and funding 

18% 

 

18% 

2.1. LCR 

9% 

 

9% 



2.2. NSFR 

9% 


 

9% 


3. Asset quality 

13% 

+ 5% 

18% 

3.1 NPL ratio 

13% 

 

13% 



3.2. Additional risk indicator (2) 

N/A 


+ 5% 

5% 


4. Business model and management 

13% 

+ 10% 

23% 

4.1. RWA / Total assets  

 

   


6.5% 

 

6.5% 



4.2. RoA 

6.5% 


 

6.5% 


4.3. Additional risk indicator (3)

 

N/A



 

+ 5% 


5% 

4.4. Additional risk indicator (4)

 

N/A


 

+ 5% 


5% 

5. Potential losses for the DGS 

13% 

+ 5% 

18% 

5.1. Unencumbered assets / Covered deposits 

13% 

 

13% 



5.3. Additional risk indicator (5) 

N/A 


+ 5% 

5% 


Sum  

75% 

+ 25% 

100% 

 

 



Requirements for risk indicators  

61.


 

The risk indicators used in the calculation method should capture a sufficiently wide spectrum 

of sources of risk.  

62.


 

The selection of the risk indicators should be aligned with the best practices in risk 

management and with the existing prudential requirements. 

63.


 

For each member institution the values of risk indicators should be calculated on a solo basis. 

64.

 

However, the value of risk indicators should be calculated at a consolidated level where the 



Member State exercises the option given in Article 13(1) of Directive 2014/49/EU to allow the 

central body and all credit institutions permanently affiliated to the central body, as referred 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



28 

to in Article 10(1) of Regulation (EU) 575/2013, to be subject as a whole to the risk weight 

determined for the central body and its affiliated institutions on a consolidated basis.  

65.


 

Where a member institution has received a waiver from meeting capital and/or liquidity 

requirements on a solo basis pursuant to Articles 7, 8 or 21 of Regulation (EU) 575/2013, the 

corresponding capital/liquidity indicators should be calculated at the consolidated or 

semi-consolidated level.  

66.


 

To calculate values of risk indicators for a given period the DGS should use: 

-

 

the value at the end of the period (for example, net income as reported on 31 December 



for the annual income statement) for positions from the income statement;  

-

 



the average value between the beginning and the end of the reporting period  (for 

example, average value of total assets from 1 January to 31 December in a given year) for 

positions from the balance sheet. 

Part IV - Optional elements of the calculation methods 



(i)

 

Minimum contribution 

67.


 

According to Article 13(1) of Directive  2014/49/EU,  Member States may decide that credit 

institutions should pay a minimum contribution irrespective of the amount of their covered 

deposits.  

68.

 

Where a Member State exercises the option to have member institutions paying a minimum 



contribution (MC) irrespective of the amount of their covered deposits, the following modified 

calculation formula should be used to calculate the individual contributions:  

a.

 

In cases where the minimum contributions are paid by each member institution in 



addition to its risk-based contributions:    

C

i



 = MC + (CR ×

 

ARW



i

 ×

 



CD

× µ



b.

 

In cases where the minimum contributions are paid only by those member institutions 



for which their  annual risk-based contributions calculated according to the standard 

formula (as specified in paragraph 35) would be lower than the amount of the 

minimum contribution: 

C

i



 = Max {MC ; (CR ×

 

ARW



i

 ×

 



CD

× µ)} 



Where: 

C

i  



=  

Annual contribution for a member institution ‘i’ 

MC

  

=  



Minimum contribution 

CR 


Contribution rate (applied for all member institutions in a given year) 

ARW

i

  = 



Aggregate risk weight for a member institution ‘i’ 

CD

i



  

Covered deposits for a member institution ‘i’  



µ  

Adjustment coefficient (applied for all institutions in a given year).  



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



29 

 

69.



 

When setting a minimum contribution, competent authorities and designated authorities 

should take due care of the risk of moral hazard inherent in setting fixed contributions and the 

risk of creating barriers to entering the market for banking services. 



(ii)

 

Reduced contributions for members of an IPS that is separate from the DGS 

 

70.



 

According to Article 13(1) of Directive 2014/49/EU, Members States may decide that members 

of an IPS pay lower contributions to the DGS. As reflected in recital 12 of 

Directive 2014/49/EU, this option has been introduced in order to recognise ‘schemes which 

protect the credit institution itself and which, in particular, ensure its liquidity and solvency’. 

71.


 

Where a Member State avails itself of this option, the  aggregated  risk  weight  (ARW)  of an 

institution which is also a member of a separate IPS may be reduced to take into account the 

additional safeguard provided by the IPS. In this case, the reduction should be implemented by 

including an additional risk indicator, related to IPS membership, in the risk category ‘Business 

model and management’  of the calculation method. The IPS membership indicator should 

reflect the additional solvency and liquidity protection provided by the scheme to the 

member, taking into account whether the amount of the IPS ex-ante funds, which are available 

without delay for both recapitalisation and liquidity funding purposes in order to support the 

affected entity if there are  problems, is sufficiently large to allow for credible and effective 

support of that entity. Additional funding commitments callable upon request and backed by 

liquidity reserves held by IPS members in IPS central institutions  may also be taken into 

account. The level of the IPS funding should be examined in relation to the total assets of the 

IPS member institution. 



(iii)

 

Use of DGS funds for failure prevention 

72.


 

Where a Member State allows a DGS, including an IPS officially recognised as a DGS, to use the 

available financial means for alternative measures in order to prevent the failure of a credit 

institution, this DGS may include an additional factor in its own risk-based calculation based on 

the risk-weighted assets of the institution. In this case, the formula is as follows: 

C

i



 = CR ×

 

ARW



i

 ×

 (



CD



+ A

) × µ 

Where A is the amount of risk-weighted assets in institution ‘i’.

 

73.


 

Before the implementation of this additional factor by a DGS, competent authorities should 

assess, as part of the approval procedure referred to in paragraph 14, whether its introduction 

is commensurate with  the risk of having to intervene in order to prevent the failure of 

institutions beyond the protection of covered deposits. 

(iv)

 

Low-risk sectors  

74.


 

According to Article 13(1) of Directive  2014/49/EU, Member States may provide for lower 

contributions  from  institutions belonging to low-risk sectors which are regulated under 

national law.  



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



30 

75.


 

If a Member State has, through regulation, imposed restrictions on institutions within a certain 

subsector in a manner that substantially reduces the likelihood of failure, DGS contributions 

from these institutions may be proportionately reduced on the basis of adequate motivation.  

76.

 

Reductions in contributions from institutions belonging to low-risk sectors should be allowed 



based on empirical evidence indicating that within these low-risk sectors the occurrence of 

failure has been consistently lower than in other sectors. Agreement on reduced contributions 

should be made by the competent authority in cooperation with the designated authority, 

after consulting the DGS. 

77.

 

Such reductions should be implemented in the calculation method by including an additional 



risk indicator into the risk category ‘Business model and management’. 

 

 



Title III - Final Provisions and 

Implementation 

78.

 

Competent authorities and designated authorities should implement these guidelines  by 



incorporating them in their supervisory processes and procedures by the end of 2015. From 

that date on, contributions to be raised by DGSs should comply with these guidelines. 

79.

 

However, where, according to the third subparagraph of Article 20(1) of Directive 2014/49/EU, 



appropriate authorities establish that a DGS is not yet in a position to comply with Article 13 of 

Directive 2014/49/EU by 3 July 2015, these guidelines should be implemented by the new date 

set by these authorities, and in any case no later than by 31 May 2016. 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



31 

Annex 1 - Methods to calculate Aggregate Risk Weights (ARW) and 

determine risk classes 

 

(i)



 

The ‘bucket’ method  

Individual risk indicators 

1.

 



In the ‘bucket’ method, a fixed number of buckets should be defined for each risk indicator by 

setting upper and lower boundaries for each bucket. The number of buckets for each risk 

indicator should be at least two. The buckets should reflect different levels of risk posed by 

the member institutions (for example,  high, medium, low risk) assessed on the basis of 

particular indicators.  

2.

 



There should be an individual risk score (IRS) assigned to each bucket. If the value of the risk 

indicator is higher (lower) than the upper (lower) boundary of the highest (lowest) bucket, it 

should be assigned the IRS of the highest (lowest) bucket.  

3.

 



The buckets’ boundaries should be determined either on a relative or absolute basis, where:  

- when using the relative basis, the IRSs of member institutions depends on their relative 

risk position vis-à-vis other institutions;  in this case,  institutions are distributed evenly 

between risk buckets, meaning that institutions with similar risk profiles may end up in 

different buckets;  

- when using the absolute basis, the buckets’ boundaries are determined to reflect the 

riskiness of a specific indicator; in this case, all institutions may end up in the same bucket 

if they all have a similar level of riskiness. 

4.

 

For each risk indicator the boundaries of buckets determined on the absolute basis should 



ensure  there is sufficient and meaningful differentiation of member institutions. The 

calibration of the boundaries should take into account, where available, the regulatory 

requirements applicable to the member institutions and historical data on the indicator’s 

values. The DGS should avoid calibrating the boundaries in such  a way that all member 

institutions, despite representing significant differences in the area measured by a particular 

risk indicator, would be classified into the same bucket.  

5.

 

For each risk indicator, the IRSs assigned to buckets should range from 0  to 100, where  0 



indicates the lowest risk and 100 the highest risk. 

 

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə