Guidelines on methods for calculating contributions to dgs



Yüklə 0.84 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə6/8
tarix28.11.2016
ölçüsü0.84 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8

4. Business model and management 

 

Sector 


concentrations 

in loan portfolio 

 

The aim of this indicator is to 



measure the risk of incurring 

substantial credit losses as a result 

of a downturn in a specific sector 

of the economy to which an 

institution is highly exposed.   

(+) 


A higher 

value 


indicates 

higher risk 

Large exposures 

 

 



 

Where:  


‘large exposures’ as defined in 

Regulation (EU) No 575/2013; 

and 

‘eligible capital’ as defined in 



point 71 in Article 4(1) of 

Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 

The aim of this indicator is to 

measure the risk of incurring 

substantial credit losses as a result 

of the failure of an individual 

counterparty or group of 

connected counterparties.   

(+) 

A higher 



value 

indicates 

higher risk 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



42 

Excessive 

balance sheet 

growth ratio  

 

 

 



This indicator measures the 

growth rate of the institution’s 

balance sheet. Unsustainably high 

growth might indicate higher risk. 

Off-balance-sheet items and their 

growth should also be included. 

When setting thresholds for this 

indicator it is necessary to 

determine what level of growth is 

considered too risky. This should 

take due account of the growth of 

the economy in a given Member 

State or national banking sector. 

When using this indicator special 

rules should be defined for new 

institutions and for entities which 

have been involved in mergers and 

acquisitions over the last few 

years.   

To avoid including one-off events in 

calculating contributions, an 

average growth observed during 

the last 3 years should be used.    

(+)  


Values 

exceeding a 

predefined 

level of 

excessive 

growth 


indicate 

higher risk 

Return on 

equity (RoE) 

 

 

 

 



 

This ratio measures institutions’ 

ability to generate profits to 

shareholders from the capital these 

have invested in the institution. A 

business model which is able to 

generate high and stable returns 

indicates reduced likelihood of 

failure. However, unsustainably 

high levels of RoE also indicate 

higher risk. Some institutions may 

have restrictions on their level of 

profitability based on their 

ownership structure so they should 

not be disadvantaged by the 

calculation method.   

To avoid including one-off events 

and avoid pro-cyclicality in 

calculating contributions, an 

average of at least 2 years should 

be used.     

 

(-)/(+) 



Negative 

values 


indicate 

higher risk. 

However, 

too high 

values can 

also indicate 

high risk 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



43 

Core earnings 

ratio 

 

 



 

Where:  


‘core earnings’ may be 

calculated as (interest income + 

fee and commission income + 

other operating income) - 

(interest expenses + fee and 

commission expenses + other 

operating expenses + 

administrative expenses + 

depreciation)  

The core earnings ratio measures 

an institution’s ability to generate 

profits from its core business lines. 

A business model which is able to 

generate high and stable earnings 

indicates reduced likelihood of 

failure. 

To avoid including one-off events 

and avoid pro-cyclicality in 

calculating contributions, an 

average of at least 2 years should 

be used.     

 

(-) 



A higher 

value 


indicates 

lower risk 

Cost-to-income 

ratio 


 

 

 



This ratio measures an institution’s 

cost efficiency. An unusually high 

ratio may indicate that the 

institution’s costs are out of 

control, especially if represented 

by the fixed costs (i.e. higher risk). 

A very low ratio may indicate that 

operating costs are too low for the 

institution to have the required 

risk and control functions in place 

(i.e. this also indicates higher risk). 

(+)/(-) 


Values of 

the ratio 

that are too 

high 


indicate 

higher risk; 

however 

values that 

are too low 

may also 

indicate 

higher risk 

Off-balance-

sheet liabilities / 

Total assets 

 

 



 

Large off-balance-sheet exposures 

indicate that an institution’s 

exposure to risk may be larger 

than that reflected in their balance 

sheet.  


(+) 

A higher 

value 

indicates 



higher risk 

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



44 

Qualitative 

assessment of 

the quality of 

management 

and internal 

governance 

arrangements  

Depending on data availability 

and operational capacity of the 

DGS, the assessment of 

qualitative aspects of its 

member institutions may be 

based on the following sources 

of information:    

-

 



questionnaires designed by 

the DGSs to assess the 

quality of management and 

internal governance 

arrangements of its 

member institutions; 

accompanied by on-site 

and/or off-site inspections 

performed by the DGSs;  

-

 



comprehensive assessment 

of institutions internal 

governance reflected in the 

SREP scores; 

-

 

external ratings assigned to 



all member institutions by a 

recognised external credit 

assessment institution.      

 

Good quality management and 



robust internal governance 

practices may mitigate risks faced 

by member institutions and reduce 

the likelihood of failure.       

Qualitative indicators are more 

forward looking than accounting 

ratios and they provide relevant 

information on the institution’s 

risk management and risk 

mitigation techniques. In order to 

be used in the calculation method 

the qualitative indicators need to 

be available for all member 

institutions of the DGS. Moreover, 

the DGS should strive to ensure 

fair and objective treatment of its 

member institutions and that the 

qualitative assessment is based on 

pre-defined criteria. The DGS 

methodology for assessing the 

quality of management and 

internal governance arrangements 

should include a list of criteria that 

should be examined with regard to 

each member institution.  

(+)/(-) 


Qualitative 

judgment 

can be both 

positive and 

negative 

IPS membership 

where the IPS is 

separate from 

the DGS  

 

 



 

 

The IPS membership indicator 



measures the level of ex-ante 

funding of the IPS.  

IPS membership, other things being 

equal, should reduce the risk of the 

institution’s failure because the 

scheme insures the entire liability 

side of the balance sheet for its 

members. However, in order for 

the IPS protection to be fully 

recognised it should fulfil 

additional conditions related to the 

level of its ex-ante funding. This 

indicative additional indicator 

maybe further refined to reflect, 

besides ex-ante funds, additional 

available funding commitments 

callable upon request and backed 

 

 



      

    


 

 

 



 

 

 



(-) 

Membership 

in the IPS 

with a 


higher level 

of ex-ante 

funding 

indicates 

lower risk     

   


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



45 

Systemic role in 

an IPS scheme 

officially 

recognised as a 

DGS 


The indicator can have two 

values:  

(i)

 

the institution has a 



systemic role in the IPS; or 

(ii)


 

the institution does not 

have a systemic role in the 

IPS   


 

The fact that an institution has a 

systemic role in the IPS, for 

example by providing other IPS 

members with critical functions, 

implies that its failure can have a 

negative impact on the viability of 

other IPS members. Therefore, the 

systemic member of the IPS should 

pay higher contributions to the 

DGS in order to reflect the 

additional risk it poses to the 

system. 

(+) 


Only binary 

values are 

possible:  

(i) indicates 

higher risk; 

(ii) does not 

indicate 

higher risk. 

 

Low-risk sectors   The indicator can have two 



values:  

(i)


 

the institution belongs to a 

low-risk sector regulated 

under national law; or 

(ii)

 

the institution does not 



belong to a low-risk sector 

regulated under national 

law   

 

 



This indicator allows the calculation 

method to reflect the fact that 

some institutions belong to 

low-risk sectors regulated under 

national law. The rationale is that 

such institutions should be 

regarded as less risky for the 

purpose of calculating 

contributions to DGSs.   

 

 



(-) 

Only binary 

values are 

possible:  

(i) indicates 

lower risk; 

(ii) indicates 

average risk. 

 

5. Potential losses for the DGS 

Own funds and 

eligible 

liabilities held 

by institution in 

excess of MREL 

 

 

 



Where:  

‘own funds’ means the sum of 

tier 1 and tier 2 capital in 

accordance with the definition 

in point (118) of Article 4(1) of 

Regulation (EU) No 575/2013; 

 

‘eligible liabilities’ are the sum 



of liabilities referred to in point 

(71) of Article 2(1) of the BRRD; 

 

‘MREL’ means the minimum 



requirement for own funds and 

eligible liabilities as defined in 

Article 45(1) of the BRRD.           

This indicator measures the loss 

absorbing capacity of the member 

institution. The higher the loss 

absorbing capacity of the 

institution, the lower the potential 

losses to the DGS.     

(-) 


A higher 

value 


indicates 

lower risk 

 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



46 

 

Annex 4 - Steps to calculate annual contributions to the DGS 



Upon collecting data from its member institutions, the DGS should take  the following steps in 

order to calculate annual contributions of all its members.    

 

Step 

Step description 

Relevant provisions from  

the guidelines 

Step 1  Define the annual target level 

Paragraph 37 of the guidelines 

Step 2  Define the contribution rate (CR) applicable 

to all member institutions in a given year 

Paragraphs 39 of the guidelines 

Step 3  Calculate values of all risk indicators 

Paragraphs 48-77 of the guidelines 

(requirements for indicators); 

Annex 2 and Annex 3 (formulas for 

indicators) 

Step 4 


Assign individual risk scores (IRSs) to all risk 

indicators for each member institution 

Paragraphs 1-5 and 13-17 of Annex 1  

Step 5 


Calculate the aggregate risk score (ARS) for 

each institution by summing up all its IRSs 

(using an arithmetic average)  

Paragraphs 41, 54-56 of the guidelines 

(requirements for weights of indicators); 

Paragraphs 6-9 and 18 of Annex 1 

Step 6 

Assign an aggregate risk weight (ARW) to 



each member institution (categorising the 

institution into a risk class) based on its 

ARS 

Paragraphs 43-45 of the guidelines; 



Paragraphs 10-12, 19-21 of Annex 1 

Step 7 


Calculate unadjusted risk-based 

contributions for each member institution 

by multiplying the contribution rate (CR) by 

institution’s covered deposits (CD) and its 

ARW 

Paragraphs 35 of the guidelines 



Step 8 

Sum up the unadjusted risk-based 

contributions of all member institutions 

and determine the adjustment coefficient 

(µ) 

Paragraphs 44 of the guidelines 



Step 9 

Apply the adjustment coefficient (µ) to all 

member institutions and calculate adjusted 

risk-based contributions     

Paragraphs 44 of the guidelines 

  


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



47 

 

4.



 

Accompanying documents 

4.1

 

Impact Assessment 



Introduction  

Article 13(3) of Directive 2014/49/EU requires the EBA to develop guidelines to specify methods 

for calculating contributions to DGSs in accordance with paragraphs 1 and 2 of the same Article. 

 

As per Article 16(2) of the EBA Regulation (Regulation (EU) No 1093/2010 of the European 



Parliament and of the Council), any guidelines developed by the EBA shall be accompanied by an 

analysis of ‘the potential related costs and benefits’. This analysis should provide the reader with 

an overview of the findings as regards the problem identification, the options identified to 

remove the problem and their potential impacts.  

 

This annex therefore  presents  an Impact Assessment  (IA)  with cost-benefit analysis of the 



provisions included in these guidelines. 

Problem definition 

Currently, in the majority of Member States the contributions of member institutions to DGSs are 

not risk-adjusted, i.e. institutions pay their contributions to DGS as a fixed percentage of deposits. 

It is reasonable to expect that the market is exposed to the following problems when the 

contributions to the DGS are not risk-adjusted: 

 



Competitive disadvantage for risk-averse institutions and unfair competition: risk-averse 

members of the DGS can be worse off if they are pooled in the DGS with institutions with 

high probability of default but their contributions are not differentiated according to the 

risk profile. Where the contributions are homogenous, the member institutions with low-

risk profile subsidise the institutions with high-risk profile.  

 



Moral hazard and insufficient incentives for sound risk management: in the absence of 

risk-adjusted contributions the institutions may not have sufficient incentives to optimise 

their risk level ex-ante. Institutions under the DGS scheme may take high risk and increase 

their probability of default without bearing the marginal cost of additional risk, i.e. 

increasing their contributions to the scheme. Overall, this practice could make the entire 

banking system more vulnerable.  

A second important issue that the guidelines aim to address is represented by variations across 

Member States in the application of practices in the DGS which cannot be justified by structural 

differences in national banking sectors, and may lead to:  


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



48 

 



an uneven playing field where institutions of similar risk profile but located in different 

Member States are subject to unequal treatment if the DGS contributions are based on 

completely divergent calculation criteria. 

Objectives 

The guidelines firstly aim to establish a framework for calculating risk-based contributions to DGSs 

that would be used in all Member States. This framework should be based on risk indicators 

reflecting institutions’ risk-profile and ensuring a fair treatment of institutions in calculating DGS 

contributions. In order to ensure there is objective risk assessment, the indicators should reflect a 

sufficiently wide spectrum of aspects of institutions’ operations. 

 

Secondly, the guidelines aim to ensure that the elements fundamental to the effective functioning 



of the DGS contribution schemes are consistent across Member States. Table 1 summarises the 

objectives of the guidelines. 

 

Table 1 Objectives of the guidelines 



Operational objectives 

Specific objectives 

General objectives 

Ex-ante contributions to DGSs 

are calculated as a function of 

risk parameters. 

Institutions fully internalise the 

cost associated with risk-taking. 

Reduce moral hazard and 

promote fairness among 

institutions in calculating DGS 

contributions. 

Common methods and criteria 

are set for risk-based 

contributions to DGSs. 

Methods and criteria in the DGS 

contributions framework are 

consistent and comparable across 

Member States. 

Create a level playing field and 

information symmetry across 

Member States. 

 

Baseline scenario 

There are ten Member States

16

 (DE, EL, FR, IT, LV, PL, PT, FI, NO



17

 and SE)  where DGSs apply 

risk-based contributions

18

. In addition, some Member States (HU, RO) do not have a risk-based 



contribution system in place but they make slightly different use of risk-based information in the 

DGS framework. Therefore, in terms of transition to risk-based contributions, the guidelines are 

expected to have an impact on the majority of Member States. 

The remainder of the section will focus on the current practices in Member States in relation to 

the technical options considered in the IA. 

                                                                                                               

16

 Member States throughout the IA refer to the Member States of the European Economic Area (EEA). 



17

 The system in Norway is based on RWA and covered deposits. 

18

 All data in this part of the IA is based on the following sources of information: European Commission, Joint Research 



Centre Unit, ‘Risk-based contributions in EU Deposit Guarantee Schemes: current practices’, June 2008; Calculating 

risk-based contributions for a DGS: Result of the EFDI Research Working group, June 2014; IADI General Guidance for 

Developing Differential Premium Systems, October 2011.

   


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



49 

Categories, indicators and the weights of the indicators 

Risk-based contributions are calculated on the basis of a single or several risk indicators (mostly 

quantitative) that aim to reflect the risk profile of each institution. The indicators that DGSs use in 

the  calculation  methods vary across Member States. While some Member States use single 

indicators (FI, NO, PT, SE), other Member States use several indicators (AT, DE, EL, FR, IT, NL

19

). 


Where multiple indicators are used, the number varies from 2 (EL) to 12 (DE

20

). Table 2 presents a 



summary of the indicators used in Member States with risk-based contributions to DGSs. 

Table 2 Indicators applied in Member States 



Indicators 

Member States 

Capital indicators 

 

DE, EL, FR, IT, NO, PT, SE 



Liquidity indicators 

DE, EL, FR, IT 



Asset quality indicators 

DE, IT 


Income/profitability indicators 

DE, IT 


Qualitative indicators 

DE, EL 


Source: European Commission, Joint Research Centre Unit, ‘Risk-based contributions in EU Deposit Guarantee Schemes: 

current practices’, June 2008; Calculating risk-based contributions for a DGS: Result of the EFDI Research Working 

group, June 2014. 

While the indicators used in Member States vary, the categories that the DGSs use are relatively 

homogenous. Most DGSs in Member States focus on the CAMELS

21

 approach. Accordingly, capital, 



liquidity, asset quality  and  profitability ratios  are the core quantitative components utilised in 

most Member States. Qualitative elements are not used widely. Only two Member States (DE and 

EL) use qualitative indicators in addition to quantitative indicators. 

In terms of weights of the indicators, current practices can be classified under three categories, 

including those which use: (i) differential weights determined by expert judgement and/or exact 

calibration (DE, IT, NL); (ii) equal weights for all risk categories (FR); and (iii) only one risk indicator 

with a weight of 100% (FI, PT, SE). For example, in Germany the methodology is based on 

common statistical procedures, such as  discriminate analysis, used in order to determine the 

weights of the indicators. Table 3 indicates the risk categories/indicators with their respective 

weights in the calculation of risk-based contributions in Member States. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Table 3 Weights for risk categories/indicators used in Member States 

                                                                                                               

19

 NL planned to introduce the risk-based contribution system in 2015. The system will include several indicators. 



20

 This is the statutory DGS for private banks. 

21

 C: capital adequacy, A: asset quality, M: management quality, E: earnings, L: liquidity, S: sensitivity to market risk. 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



50 

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə