Guidelines on methods for calculating contributions to dgs



Yüklə 0.84 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə5/8
tarix28.11.2016
ölçüsü0.84 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8

Box 4 - Examples of bucket-scoring by type of risk indicator 

The following examples illustrate how the individual risk scores (IRSs), from a range of 0 to 100, 

should be assigned to various buckets for different types of risk indicators.  



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



32 

  

Scenario 1  



Five buckets; a risk indicator for which higher values indicate higher risk (for example, NPL ratio) 

 

Buckets 



Boundaries 

IRS 


Bucket 1 

< 2% 

Bucket 2 



≤ 2 – 3.5% < 

25 


Bucket 3 

≤ 3.5 – 5% < 

50 

Bucket 4 



≤ 5 - 7% < 

75 


Bucket 5 

≥ 7% 


100 

 

Scenario 2  



Three buckets; a risk indicator for which higher values indicate higher risk (for example, NPL ratio) 

 

Buckets 



Boundaries 

IRS  


Bucket 1 

< 2% 

Bucket 2 



≤ 2 - 7% > 

50 


Bucket 3 

≥ 7% 


100 

 

Scenario 3  



Four buckets; a risk indicator for which higher values indicate lower risk (for example, liquidity 

ratio) 


 

Buckets 


Boundaries 

IRS  


Bucket 1 

> 60% 


Bucket 2 



< 40 – 60% ≤ 

33 


Bucket 3 

< 20 - 40% ≤ 

66 


Bucket 4 

≤ 20% 


100 

 

Scenario 4  



Two buckets; a risk indicator with binary values that can be either neutral or negative to the risk 

profile assessment (for example, Excessive balance sheet growth ratio) 

 

Buckets 


Boundaries 

IRS 


Bucket 1 

< 15% 

50 


Bucket 2  

≥ 15% 


100 

Scenario 5 

Two buckets; risk indicator with binary values that can be either positive or neutral to the risk 

profile assessment (for example, institution belonging to the low-risk sector regulated under the 

national law should be regarded as less risky,  whereas the institutions not belonging to the 

low-risk sectors should be considered as posing an average risk).  

 

Buckets 


Boundaries 

IRS 


Bucket 1  Institution belonging to a low-risk sector  

Bucket 2  Institution not belonging to the low-risk sector 



50 

 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



33 

Aggregate risk score (ARS) 

6.

 



Each IRS for an institution ‘i' should be multiplied by an indicator weight (IW

j

) assigned to a 



specific risk indicator. It should then be summed up to an aggregate risk score (ARS

i

) using an 



arithmetic average.  

7.

 



The weights assigned to each indicator ‘i'  (IW

j

) should be the same for all institutions and 



calibrated by using supervisory assessment and/or historical data on failures of institutions.  

8.

 



The structure of the described model could be as follows: 

Risk 


indicator 

Indicator 

weight 

Buckets 


Individual risk 

scores (IRS) 

Indicator   

 

A



1

 

  



B

1

 



 

… 

… 



M

1

 



 

Indicator   

 

A

2



 

  

B



2

 

 



… 

…  


M

2

 



 

 

 



 

  

… 



… 

… 

… 



  

 

 



  

Indicator 

 

 

A



n

 

  



B

n

 



 

… 

…  



M

n

 



 

 

Scenario 6 



Three buckets; risk indicator with non-standard interpretation of results (for example, RoA) where 

both negative values (losses) as well as the excessive values of the indicator may indicate that the 

institution has a high risk profile.  

Buckets 


Boundaries 

IRS  


Bucket 1 

≤ 0 – 2% ≤ 

Bucket 2 



< 2 – 15% ≤ 

50 


Bucket 3 

< 0% or > 15% 

100 


 

Please note that in examples under Scenarios 1-4 the mapping of the individual risk scores (IRS) to 

buckets is linear (for example, 0 – 33 – 66 – 100). This is not the general requirement and for 

some risk indicators applying a non-symmetrical allocation of the IRS within the range of 0-100 

(for example, 0 – 25 – 50 – 90 – 100) may be warranted in order to properly reflect the cases 

where the institution becomes significantly  more risky when the indicator’s value reaches a 

specific threshold.  


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



34 

9.

 



The  aggregate  risk  score (

) for institution ‘i'  should  be calculated for each institution 

according to the following formula: 

 

Where  



, and 

 

, for some   in 



 (i.e. the bucket corresponding to indicator  ) 

Aggregate risk weight (ARW) 

10.


 

Every 


 

should have a corresponding aggregate risk weight (ARW

i

), which should be used 



to calculate the  contribution of an individual member institution (C

i

) according to the 



contribution formula specified in paragraph

 

35 of these guidelines.  



Risk classes 

11.


 

The ARW may be calculated via a bucketing method, where ranges for the ARS are defined in 

such a way that they correspond to a particular risk class and ARW (see table below).  

Risk Class 

Aggregate risk score (ARS

boundaries 

Aggregate risk 

weight (ARW) 

 

≤ 



 

 



 

≤ 

 



 

 



≤ 

 

 



… 

  

… 



 

… 

 



12.

 

The number of risk classes should be proportionate to the number and variety of DGS 



member institutions. However, the number of risk classes should be four as a minimum. There 

should be at least one risk class for member institutions with an average risk, at least one risk 

class for low-risk members, and at least two risk classes for high-risk institutions. 

 

Box 5 - Example – application of aggregate risk weights to institutions 

The following example illustrates how the aggregate risk weight (ARW) might be assigned to the 

member institutions on the basis of the values of the aggregate risk scores and assuming that 

there are four risk classes with risk weights (75%, 100%, 125% and 150%) assigned to each class in 

the following manner:   

Risk class 

Boundaries for ARS 

ARW  



< 40 



75% 

≤ 40 – 55 < 



100% 

 55 – 70 < 



125% 

≥ 70 



150% 

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



35 

(ii)

 

The ‘sliding scale’ method  

Individual risk indicators 

13.


 

In this method, for each institution, an Individual Risk Score (

) will be calculated for each 

risk indicator .  Each indicator should have an upper  and a lower boundary,   and   

defined. When a higher indicator value indicates a riskier institution and the indicator is above 

the upper boundary, the 

 will be a fixed value of 100. Similarly, when the indicator’s value 

is below the lower boundary, the 

 will be 0. Analogously, if a lower indicator indicates a 

riskier situation and the indicator is below the lower boundary, the 

 will be a fixed value 

of 100. Correspondingly, when the indicator value is above the upper boundary, the 

 will 

be 0.  


14.

 

If the indicator’s value is between the defined boundaries, the 



 will lie between 0  and 

100. Each 

 has a pre-determined risk-weight which is used to calculate the aggregate risk 

score for each institution ‘i' (

). By design, in this model the

 

will always be a value 



between 0 and 100. 

15.


 

For each risk indicator a determination of the upper and lower boundaries   and  should 

ensure  there is sufficient and meaningful differentiation of member institutions. The 

calibration of these boundaries should take into account, where available, the regulatory 

requirements applicable to the member institutions and historical data on the indicator’s 

values. The DGS should avoid calibrating the upper and lower boundaries in such a way that 

all member institutions, despite significant differences in the area measured by a particular 

risk indicator, will persistently fall either below the lower or above the upper boundary.  

16.

 

The structure of the described model could be as follows: 



Risk indicator 

Indicator 

weight 

Upper 


boundary 

Lower 


boundary 

Individual risk 

scores (IRS) 

Indicator   

 

 

 

 

Indicator   

 

 

 

 

… 

… 



… 

… 

… 



Indicator   

 

 



 

 

 

 



For instance, if the ARS for a given institution is 62 this institution should be classified into the 

third risk class and the ARW of 125% should be assigned to it.  



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



36 

Where:  


 

17.



 

For each risk indicator  , its value will correspond to an output score (

), defined as 

follows: 

 

 

, where j = 1…n 



 

 

or 



 

 

, where j = 1…n 



 

Aggregate risk score (ARS) 

18.


 

The aggregate risk score (

) for an institution ‘i'  will be calculated as 

 

.  



Aggregate risk weight (ARW) 

19.


 

The ARS


i

 might be translated into an aggregate risk weight (ARW

i

) by using a ‘sliding scale’ 



method based either on a linear or exponential formula.  

20.


 

The following linear formula can be used to translate ARS

i

 into the ARW



i

:  


 

In this method, the 

 

associated to the 



 is linear, with an upper and lower boundary, 

 and  , for example, 150% and 75%, respectively. For a given institution where the 

 is 

100 (the riskiest score), the corresponding risk weight will be  , the highest risk weight. 



Similarly, if the 

 

is 0, the corresponding risk weight will be  , the lowest risk weight. The 



graph below illustrates the linear behaviour of the suggested formula. 

 

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



37 

 

21.


 

The following exponential formula can be used to translate ARS

i

 into the ARW



i

 



C1 

 



O

 

In this method, the 



 

associated to the 

 is exponential, with an upper and lower 

boundary,    and  , for example, 150% and 75%. For a given institution where the 

 is 100 

(the riskiest score), the corresponding risk weight will be  , the highest risk weight. Similarly, if 

the 

 

is 0, the corresponding risk weight will be  , the lowest risk weight. The graph below 



illustrates the non-linear behaviour of the suggested formula so that there is a higher increase 

in the contribution when an institution lies on the higher end of the risk scale. This formula 

presents a stronger incentive for institutions to have a lower risk score, when compared to a 

linear method. The calculation method may also include non-linear methods other than the 

logarithmic one presented in this annex. 

 

 

 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



38 

Annex 2 - Description of core risk indicators 



 

Indicator name 

Formula / Description 

Comments 

Sign 

1. Capital 

1.1.Leverage 

ratio 

 

 



This formula should be replaced by 

the leverage ratio as defined in 

Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 once it 

becomes fully operational. 

The aim of the leverage ratio 

is to measure the capital 

position regardless of the risk 

weighting of the assets.     

 

(-) 


A higher 

value 


indicates 

lower risk  

1.2. Capital 

coverage ratio 

 

 

or 



 

 

 



 

Capital coverage ratio 

measures the actual capital 

held by a member institution 

in excess of the total capital 

requirements applicable to 

that institution, including 

additional own funds required 

pursuant to Article 104(1)(a) 

of Directive 2013/36/EU.  

 

(-) 


A higher 

value 


indicates 

lower risk  

1.3. Common 

Equity Tier 1 

ratio (CET1 

ratio) 


 

 

 



Where:  

‘risk-weighted assets’ means the 

total risk exposure amount as 

defined in Article 92(3) of Regulation 

(EU) No 575/2013.  

 

The CET1 ratio expresses the 



amount of capital held by an 

institution. A high ratio 

indicates good 

loss-absorption capacity 

which can mitigate risks from 

the institution’s business 

activities.  

(-) 


A higher 

value 


indicates 

better risk 

mitigation  

2. Liquidity and funding 

 

 

2.1. Liquidity 

Coverage Ratio 

(LCR) 


LCR ratio as defined in Regulation 

(EU) No 575/2013 once it becomes 

fully operational. 

The aim of the LCR ratio is to 

measure an institution’s 

ability to meet its short-term 

debt obligations as they come 

due. The higher the ratio, the 

larger the safety margin to 

meet obligations and 

unforeseen liquidity 

shortfalls.  

   

(-) 


A higher 

ratio 


indicates 

lower risk  



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



39 

2.2. Net stable 

funding ratio 

(NSFR)  


NSFR ratio as defined in Regulation 

(EU) No 575/2013 once it becomes 

fully operational. 

The aim of the NSFR ratio is 

to measure an institution’s 

ability to match the maturity 

of its assets and liabilities. 

The higher the ratio, the 

better the maturity match 

and the lower the funding 

risk.  

(-) 


A higher 

ratio 


indicates 

lower risk   

2.3. Liquidity 

ratio (national 

definition) 

 

 



Where:  

‘liquid assets’ as defined in the 

national regulations for supervising 

credit institutions (to be replaced 

with the LCR ratio when in force). 

 

Transitional indicator.  



The aim of the liquidity ratio 

is to measure an institution’s 

ability to meet its short term 

debt obligations as they 

become due. The higher the 

ratio, the larger the safety 

margin to meet obligations 

and unforeseen liquidity 

shortfalls.  

 

(-) 



A higher 

value 


indicates 

lower risk   



3. Asset quality 

3.1 Non-


performing 

loans ratio (NPL 

ratio) 

 

   



or alternatively, in cases where 

national accounting or reporting 

standards do not impose on 

institutions an obligation to report 

data on debt Instruments:      

 

 



 

Where (in both cases):  

‘non-performing loans’ as defined in 

the national regulations for the 

purpose of supervising credit 

institutions. 

‘Non-performing loans’ should be 

reported gross of provisions. 

The NPL ratio gives an 

indication of the type of 

lending an institution engages 

in. A high degree of credit 

losses in the loan portfolio 

indicates lending to high-risk 

segments / customers.  

(+) 


A higher 

value 


indicates 

higher risk  



4. Business model and management 

 

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



40 

4.1. Risk-

weighted assets 

(RWA) / Total 

assets ratio 

 

   



 

 

 



Where:  

‘risk-weighted assets’ means the 

total risk exposure amount as 

defined in Article 92(3) of Regulation 

(EU) No 575/2013  

 

 



The level of RWA gives an 

indication of the type of 

lending an institution engages 

in. A high ratio indicates that 

an institution engages in risky 

activities.  

For this ratio, the guidelines 

permit use of different 

calibration for institutions 

using advanced methods (for 

example, IRB) or standardised 

methods for calculating 

minimum own funds 

requirements.    

(+) 

A higher 



value 

indicates 

higher risk   

4.2 Return on 

assets (RoA) 

 

 



 

 

 



RoA measures an institution’s 

ability to generate profits. A 

business model which is able 

to generate high and stable 

returns indicates lower risk. 

However, unsustainably high 

levels of RoA also indicate 

higher risk. Institutions which 

have restrictions on their level 

of profitability due to 

provisions under national law 

or in their statutes, should not 

be disadvantaged by the 

calculation method.   

To avoid including one-off 

events and avoid pro-

cyclicality in contributions, an 

average of at least 2 years 

should be used. 

  

(+)/(-)  



Negative 

values 


indicate 

higher risk 

but too high 

values can 

also indicate 

high risk    



5. Potential losses for the DGS 

5.1. 


Unencumbered 

assets / covered 

deposits 

 

Where: ‘encumbered assets’ is 



defined in the EBA guidelines on 

disclosure of encumbered and 

unencumbered assets    

 

This ratio measures the 



degree of expected 

recoveries from the 

bankruptcy estate of the 

institution which was 

resolved or put into normal 

insolvency proceedings. An 

institution with a low ratio 

exposes the DGS to higher 

expected loss.   

 

(-) 



A higher 

value 


indicates 

lower risk 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



41 

Annex 3 - Description of additional risk indicators 

1.

 

The following list of additional risk indicators is provided for illustration purposes only.  



2.

 

Where  data on specific items used in the formulas presented below is not covered by the 



national financial or regulatory reporting templates, the DGS may use equivalent items from its 

national templates. 



 

Indicator name 

Formula / Description 

Comments 

Sign 

3. Asset quality 

Level of 

forbearance  

 

 



 

Where:  


‘exposures with forbearance 

measures’ as defined in the EBA 

guidelines on supervisory 

reporting on forbearance and 

non-performing exposures      

 

This ratio measures the extent to 



which counterparties of the 

institution have been granted 

modification of terms and 

conditions of their loan contracts. 

The ratio gives information on the 

forbearance policy of the 

institution and it may be compared 

to the level of default itself. A high 

value of this ratio indicates known 

problems in the loan portfolio of 

the institutions or potential low 

quality of other assets. 

(+) 

A higher 



value 

indicates 

higher risk 

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə