Guidelines on methods for calculating contributions to dgs



Yüklə 0.84 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/8
tarix28.11.2016
ölçüsü0.84 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8

Box 2 – Example of application of the calculation formula 

For illustration purposes,  calculations  in this example are carried out for a Member State A  in 

year 2X01. There are only three credit institutions and one DGS in that Member State and the 

total amount of deposits covered by the DGS is EUR 1,500,000. It is assumed that year 2X01 is the 

first year when the DGS in  Member State A  starts collecting ex-ante  contributions from 

deposit-taking institutions in order to reach a target level of 0.8% of covered deposits in 10 years 

(i.e. by year 2X11). Therefore, in line with the requirement to spread contributions as evenly as 

possible, the annual target level, representing total annual contributions (C) from all institutions 

in Member State A  in year 2X01,  should  be  approximately 1/10 of the target level. The 

contribution  rate  (CR)  in this case amounts to 0.0008 (CR = 1/10 × 0.8%). The total annual 

contributions for year 2X01 should be calculated as follows: C = EUR 1,500,000 x (0.0008) = EUR 

1,200.  


The table below shows the breakdown of the total covered deposits and the respective 

risk-unadjusted contributions by the institutions in Member State A in year 2X01. 

 

Risk-unadjusted contributions in Member State A in year 2X01 



Institution 

Covered deposits (EUR) 

Risk-unadjusted contributions (EUR) 

Institution 1 

 

 



Institution 2 

 

 



Institution 3 

 

 



Total 

 

 



The method for calculating risk-based contributions adopted in Member State A  relies on four 

different risk classes, with different aggregate risk weights (ARW) assigned to each risk class as 

follows: 75% for the institution with the lowest risk profile, 100% for institutions with the average 

risk profile, 120% for risky institutions, and 150% for the most risky institutions. 



GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



17 

The following formula is used to calculate annual contributions for individual institutions ‘i’: 

C

i

 = CR ×



 

ARW


i

 ×

 



CD

× µ 



Scenario 1: relatively high-risk institutions in year 2X01 

Under Scenario 1,  the ARW

for institutions 1, 2, and 3 are 75%, 150% and 120%, respectively. 



After applying only the  risk-adjusting factor based on the ARW,  the amount of total annual 

contributions from all institutions in Member State A  is  EUR  1,464, which is higher than the 

planned total annual contribution level (EUR 1,200), as illustrated in the table below.  

Risk-adjusted contributions in Member State A in year 2X01 under Scenario 1 



Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted contributions (EUR) 

Institution 1 

 

 



 

Institution 2 

 

 



 

Institution 3 

 

 



 

Total 

 

 



 

Therefore, an adjustment coefficient   should be used to ensure that the total annual 

contributions (i.e. the sum of all individual contributions) would equal 1/10 of the target level. In 

this case, the adjustment coefficient to be applied for all institutions can be calculated as µ



1

 = EUR 


1,200 / EUR 1,464 = 0.82. The estimates for the risk-adjusted contributions after the application of 

the adjustment coefficient µ



1

 are presented in the table below.  

Corrected risk-adjusted contributions in Member State A in year 2X01 under scenario 1 

Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted 

contributions 

(EUR) 

Adjustment 

coefficient µ

i

 

Final risk-adjusted 

contributions (EUR) 

Institution 1 

 

 



 

 

 



Institution 2 

 

 



 

 

 



Institution 3 

 

 



 

 

 



Total 

 

 



 

 

 



Scenario 2: relatively low-risk institutions in year 2X01 

Under Scenario 2,  the ARW

for institutions 1, 2, and 3 are 75%, 120% and 75%, respectively. 



When  only the  risk-adjusting factor (ARW) is applied, the total annual contribution from all 

institutions in the Member State A  is  EUR  1,044 and it is lower than the planned total annual 

contribution level of EUR 1,200. 

Risk-adjusted contributions in Member State A in year 2X01 under scenario 2 



Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted contributions (EUR) 

Institution 1 

 

 



 

Institution 2 

 

 



 

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



18 

Institution 3 

 

 



 

Total 

 

 



 

The adjustment coefficient µ is applied so that the total annual contribution equals 1/10 of the 

target level. Under this scenario, the adjustment coefficient to be applied for all institutions can 

be calculated as µ



= EUR 1,200 / EUR 1,044 = 1.15. As the sum of the risk-adjusted contributions 

is lower than the annual target level, the adjustment coefficient is greater than 1.   

Corrected risk-adjusted contributions in Member State   in year 2X01 under scenario 2 



Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted 

contributions 

(EUR) 

Adjustment 

coefficient µ

i

 

Final risk-adjusted 

contributions (EUR) 

Institution 1 

 

 



 

 

 



Institution 2 

 

 



 

 

 



Institution 3 

 

 



 

 

 



Total 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Scenario 3: annual target level adjusted to reflect macroprudential environment 

Under Scenario 3, the ARW

i

 for institutions 1, 2, and 3 are 75%, 150% and 120%, respectively. The 



financial market in Member State A is experiencing volatility which has led to an increase in credit 

losses for institutions, not only in a specific segment but throughout the banking system. It  is 

decided to lower the annual target level in order to avoid spreading contagion to the rest of the 

DGS members. It is decided that in year 2X01 the annual target level will be 75% of the 1/10 of 

the overall target level and so will be EUR 900 (EUR 1,200 × 0.75). Therefore, the contribution rate 

in this case amounts to 0.0006 (CR = (1/10 × 0.75) × 0.8%)). 

Risk-adjusted contributions in Member State A in year 2X01 under scenario 3 

Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted contributions (EUR) 

Institution 1 

 

 



 

Institution 2 

 

 



 

Institution 3 

 

 



 

Total 

 

 



 

Adjustment coefficient µ is applied to ensure that the total annual contribution equals 75% of the 

1/10 of the target level. Under this scenario, the adjustment coefficient to be applied for all 

institutions can be calculated as  µ



=  EUR  900 / EUR  1,098 = 0.82.  The estimates for the risk-

adjusted contributions after the application of the adjustment coefficient µ

3

 are presented in the 

table below. 

Corrected risk-adjusted contributions in Member State A in year 2X01 under scenario 3 



Institution 

CD

i

 (EUR)  

 ARW

i

 

Risk-adjusted 

contributions 

(EUR) 

Adjustment 

coefficient µ

i

 

Final risk-adjusted 

contributions (EUR) 

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



19 

Institution 1 

 

 



 

 

 



Institution 2 

 

 



 

 

 



Institution 3 

 

 



 

 

 



Total 

 

 



 

 

900 



The adjustment coefficient µ can be determined after all member institutions are categorised into 

risk classes and are assigned aggregate  risk  weights (reflecting their risk profile). If upon 

performing calculations by the DGS, some institutions would update  the data used for risk 

classification (for example, to correct accounting errors from the previous reporting periods), the 

DGS should be able to postpone the adjustment until the next call for contributions. In effect, this 

will mean that, for example where an institution contributed too little because of using incorrect 

data, its next contribution will include the missing amount from the previous year (year 1) and the 

correct amount for the current year (year 2). In this scenario, in year 1 all the other institutions 

would have contributed more than they should have and their contributions in year 2 will be 

adjusted to account for the overpayment in year 1. 

 

 

 



Element 2. Thresholds for aggregate risk weights (ARW) 

45.


 

In order to help mitigate moral hazard the ARWs should reflect the differences in risk incurred 

by different member institutions. Where the calculation method uses risk classes with 

different ARWs assigned to them (the ‘bucket’ method), it should set specific values of ARW 

applicable to each risk class. Where the calculation method follows the ‘sliding scale’ approach 

instead of a fixed number of risk classes, the upper and lower limits of ARWs should be set. 

46.

 

The lowest ARW should range between 50% and 75% and the highest ARW between 150% and 



200%. A wider interval could be set upon justification that the interval limited to 50%-200% 

does not sufficiently reflect  the differences in business models and risk profiles of member 

institutions, and would create moral hazard by artificially grouping together member 

institutions with very different risk profiles. 

47.

 

The DGS should strive to map the ARW to the aggregate risk scores (ARS) in such a way that it 



is possible for member institutions to be assigned to the lowest and highest ARW, and for the 

various risk classes to be populated. In particular, the DGS should avoid calibrating the model 

in  such  a way that almost all member institutions, despite having significantly different risk 

profiles, would be assigned to only one risk class (for example, the risk class for institutions 

with an average risk profile). However, this does not imply that in each year the DGS should 

necessarily use the full interval and assign institutions to the ARW corresponding to the lowest 

and the highest points of the interval. 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



20 

Element 3. Risk categories and core risk indicators  

Categories of risk indicators   

48.


 

The calculation of the aggregate risk weight (ARW

i

) for an individual member institution should 



be based on a set of risk indicators from each of the following risk categories:  

a.

 



Capital 

b.

 



Liquidity and funding 

c.

 



Asset quality  

d.

 



Business model and management 

e.

 



Potential losses for the DGS  

49.


 

Within each category, the calculation method should include the core risk indicators specified 

in Table 1. As an exception, competent authorities may exclude or allow the DGS to exclude, 

with regard to specific types  of institutions,  a core indicator  upon justification that this 

indicator is unavailable because of the legal characteristics or supervisory regime of such 

institutions. 

50.

 

Where competent authorities or the DGS remove a core risk indicator for a specific type of 



institution, they should strive to use the most appropriate proxy for the removed indicator. 

They should ensure that the risks posed by the institution to the system are reflected in other 

indicators used. They should also take into account the need for a level playing field with other 

institutions for which the excluded indicator is available. 

51.

 

Risk categories and core indictors are described in Table 1 below. The core risk indicators are 



also described in more detail in Annex 2.  

Table 1. Risk categories and core risk indicators  

Risk category 

Description of the risk categories and core risk indicators 

A.

 

Likelihood of failure  

1. Capital 

Capital indicators reflect the level of loss-absorbing capacity of the institution. 

Higher amounts of capital held by the institution indicate that it has a  better 

ability to absorb losses internally (mitigating the risks arising from the 

institution’s high-risk profile), thus decreasing its likelihood of failure. Therefore, 

institutions with higher values of capital indicators should contribute less to the 

DGS.    

Core indicators:  

-

 

Leverage ratio



12

, and 


-

 

Capital coverage ratio or common equity tier 1 ratio (CET1) 



                                                                                                               

12

 Tier 1 capital/Total assets ratio should be used until a definition of a leverage  ratio determined according to 



Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 is fully operational. 

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



21 

2. Liquidity 

and funding 

The liquidity and funding indicators measure the institution’s ability to meet its 

short- and long-term obligations as they come due without adversely affecting 

its financial condition. Low liquidity levels indicate the risk that the institution 

may be unable to meet its current and future, expected or unexpected, 

cash-flow obligations and collateral needs. 

Core indicators:  

-

 



liquidity coverage ratio

13

 (LCR), and  



-

 

net stable funding ratio



14

 (NSFR)  



3. Asset 

quality  

Asset quality indicators demonstrate the extent to which the institution is likely 

to experience credit losses. Large credit losses may cause financial problems that 

increase the likelihood of failure of the institution. For instance, a high 

non-performing loan ratio  (NPL)  indicates that the institution is more likely to 

incur substantial losses and consequently require a DGS intervention; therefore, 

this justifies higher contributions to the DGSs.  

Core indicator:  

-

 

non-performing loans ratio (NPL) 



4.Business 

model and 

management 

This risk category takes into account the risk related to the institution’s current 

business model and strategic plans, and reflects the quality of the institution’s 

internal governance and internal controls. 

Business model indicators can, for instance, include indicators related to 

profitability, balance sheet development and exposure concentration: 

 

Profitability indicators provide information on the ability of the member 



institution to generate profits. Low profitability or losses incurred by the 

institution indicate that it may face financial problems that could lead to its 

failure. However, high and unsustainable profits may also indicate elevated 

risk. In order to avoid point-in-time measurements, the profitability 

indicators should be calculated as average values over a period of at least 

2 years. This will mitigate pro-cyclical effects and better reflect the 

sustainability of the income sources. For institutions which have restrictions 

on their level of profitability due to provisions under national law or in their 

statutes, this indicator may be set aside or calibrated in relation to the 

institution’s peer group that has similar restrictions.    

 

Balance sheet development indicators can provide information on potential 



excessive growth in total assets, certain portfolios or segments. These 

indicators may also include the relative measure of risk-weighted assets to 

total assets. 

 



Concentration indicators can provide information on excessive sectoral or 

geographical concentrations of institution’s exposures.        

Other potential types of risk indicators in this category include: indicators 

measuring economic efficiency or sensitivity to market risk, or  market-based 

                                                                                                               

13

 If available, a national definition of the  liquidity ratio, such as Liquid assets/Total assets  should be used until the 



Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 measures are fully operational. 

14

 The NSFR ratio should be applied once its definition as determined in  Regulation (EU) No 575/2013  is fully 



operational.   

GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



22 

indicators. 

The management indicators introduce qualitative factors into the risk 

classification of the institutions in order to reflect the  quality of their internal 

governance arrangements. In particular, qualitative indicators can be based on 

off-site and on-site inspections performed by the  DGSs; on special 

questionnaires designed for this purpose by the  DGSs and/or on the 

comprehensive assessment of the institutions’ internal governance reflected in 

the SREP.    

Core indicators:  

-

 

Risk-weighted assets/Total assets, and   



-

 

Return on assets (RoA) 



B.

 

Potential losses for the DGS 

5. Potential 

losses for the 

DGS  

This risk category reflects the risk of losses for the DGS if a member institution 

fails. The extent to which the institution’s assets are encumbered

15 


will have a 

particular impact as encumbrance will reduce  the prospect of the DGS 

recovering the pay-out amount from the institution’s bankruptcy estate. 

Core indicator: 

-

 

Unencumbered assets / Covered deposits 



 

Additional risk indicators 

52.


 

In addition to  the core risk indicators, DGSs may include additional risk indicators that are 

relevant for determining the risk profile of member institutions.   

53.


 

The additional risk indicators should be classified into appropriate risk categories according to 

Table 1. Only in cases where additional indicators do not fall into the description of any other 

risk category, should they  be  classified  into the ‘Business  model and management  risk’ 

category. 

54.


 

Each DGS should define its own set of risk indicators in order to reflect the differences in risk 

profiles  of its member institutions. Annex 3 provides a list of examples of additional 

quantitative and qualitative risk indicators with a detailed description. 

 

Weights for risk indicators and categories   

55.


 

The sum of weights assigned to all risk indicators in the method for calculating contributions to 

DGSs should be equal to 100%.  

                                                                                                               

15

 Definition of encumbered assets for the purpose of the EBA guidelines on disclosure of encumbered and 



unencumbered assets is determined in the following way: ‘an asset should be treated as encumbered if it has been 

pledged or if it is subject to any form of arrangement to secure, collateralise or credit-enhance any on-balance-sheet or 

off-balance-sheet transaction from which it cannot be freely withdrawn (for instance, to be pledged for funding 

purposes)’.  

 


GUIDELINES ON METHODS FOR CALCULATING CONTRIBUTIONS TO DGS  

 

 



23 

56.


 

When assigning weights to particular  risk indicators,  the minimum weights for the risk 

categories and core risk indicators, as specified in Table 2, should be preserved.  

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə