Seçkilərə dair qanunvericiliyin analizi: beynəlxalq normalar, problemlər və perspektivlər



Yüklə 5.01 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə10/15
tarix30.11.2016
ölçüsü5.01 Kb.
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15
parties
with
organizations in at least 20% of ditsricts and their blocs should have right
to put forth candidates.
The
working
group
checking
accuracy   of
candidate
registration
documents should be composed of independent experts, basis for refusing
registration should be concrete and registration deposit should be applied
for an alternative variant  to  registration. Checking accuracy  of voter
signatures should be excluded from the Code for being absurd.
A voter supporting a candidate should simply submit ID number instead
of signature,  and it should be  enough as a person's consent.  Separately,
opportunites for applying electronic signature  should be  expanded,
platform for online  support for a candidate should be created within
www.e-gov.az
system.
E) Pre-election campaign
Pre-election campaign, right to freely assemble
and media participation in campaigning
Pre-election campaign is one of the significant phases of election process in
elections and referendums. In this phase, candidates explain to their voters
economic, social and political programs they will realize in case of election
and try  to gain their votes. From this viewpoint, campaiging process is the
most
colorful
phase
of elections.
But   as
OSCE/ODIHR
Election
Observation Mission indicated in 2013 report "the concept of pre-election
campaigning and its description by  election bodies should not  restrict
political actors' engagement in political activity aside of official campaining
period, or press should not impose  restrictions on covering ordinary
election processes".
Campaiging is conducted via different means during elections. The first one
can be called physical contact, assemblying freely in the same place. In this
case, candidates are meeting with voters, organize meetings, prepare and

124
distribute ads and calendars, prepare and distribute to voters booklets, discs,
or personally meet every voter and declare purposes.
The  second  and most important method during  campaigning is delivering
goals to voters via means of mass media. There are serious problems in the
use of both campaigning ways.
Use of the right of freedom of assembly
The Election Code's setting only 22 days for pre-election campaign does not
physically enable to conduct wthin this period all forms of campaiging
(meetings with voters, mass gatherings, campaigning in print and electronic
media). Chances to use the right to freely  assemble and establish direct
contacts with voters are  restricted taking into consideration 70 district
centers and cities, over  4.500 villages and  settlements in the  country.
Particularly,
it
is
more difficult
during
presidential
elections
and
referendums when campaigning should be conducted all  over the country.
This aspect  also restricts political  parties' chance  to  show respect  for the
country  population and meet them during parliamentary elections. The
election period being very short term, along with recent general and abstract
provisions included into the "Law on Freedom  of Assembly" and Election
Code, have excluded freedom of assembly as a right and has introduced this
right  as an exception and opportunity subject to restrictive permission
system.
The biggest obstacle on the way of implementation of freedom of assembly
is the Law "On Freedom of Assembly" adopted on November 13, 1998 and
later decorated with restrictice norms. The law creates clear impression that
its goal is to restrict the right not to regulate it. As if this law is considered
for preventing from implementing the right to freely assemble envisaged in
Constitution. The Constitution Law of the Republic  of Azerbaijan on
regulating human rights and freedoms in the Republic of Azerbaijan was not
adopted in 1998, the date when this law was adopted. Generally, it was not
possible then to impose restrictions by  any law except for the cases
envisaged in the Constitution itself –war, military  situation, emergency
situation, as well  as mobilisation. Despite  this, the law includes several
restrictions and most of them are contrary to Constitution and article 11 of
the Convention.
Article  6 of the Law bans foreigners and persons without  citizenship  to be
organizer of peaceful gatherings with political purposes. However,

125
Constitution has recognized the right "for everybody" and has not implied
restriction for anybody.
According to Article 8 (IV) of this Law, "holding a peaceful assembly  of
political  content  can be  prohibited by  the  decision of  the  relevant  body of
executive  power on the  eve  and during the  period of carrying out
international  events of  state  importance  on the territories of  cities and
regions where they are conducted”. This norm also directly contradicts
Constitution and article 11 of the Convention. The  concept of preparation
period is generally an elastic notion and is an artificial way to restrict human
rights.
Article 9 of the Law is absolutely against Constitution and Article 11 of the
Convention. Section III of the  article  reads: "Conducting gatherings,
meetings,  demonstrations  and  street processions  can be prohibited  in a
radius of  200 meters around buildings housing legislative, executive and
court  power of  the  Republic  of  Azerbaijan". The  restriction here  does not
include any urgency for democratic society, or protection of any other right
and freedom. People's constituional rights have been brutally  restricted
without any grounds.
The non-allowance to use freedom of assembly envisaged in Section VI of
Article  9 in  places other  than the  specified, the  hour restriction norms in
section VII for gatherings also contradict  Constitution and Article 11 of
Convention. Particularly, Law has charged relevant executive body  to
approve places for free gatherings and directly  authorized it to interfere in
place and targets of citizens' ability to exercise this right. In practice, every
constituency  has one pre-approved place for assembly during election
period and  regretfully, places not  suitable  for social gatherings are more
remarkable in list. For years, the right to freely assemble has been brought
to the form  of right used simply during elections, absolutely forbidden or
seriously restricted in later periods. Most of political parties cannot exercise
this right  in post-election period and remain subject to relevant executive
body’s "generosity". Exercizing this right without prior consent is absolutely
banned.
Evaluation of legislation gives grounds to  note that even though the
Constitutional norm regulating freedom of assembly was satisfactory, the
Constitutional Law of the Republic of Azerbaijan "On regulation of
implementation of human   rights and freedoms in the   Republic of
Azerbaijan"  adopted by the National Assembly on  December 24, 2002,

126
contradicted the Constitution, carrying the  same legal force  with the
Constitution, and created conditions to restrict  several moments connected
with human rights, further restricted these rights. The Law "On Freedom of
Assembly" adopted November 13, 1998, does not generally  meet the
requirements of either the Constitution, or the Constitutional law adopted in
2002, or Article  11 of the  European Convention "On protection of human
rights and main freedoms" ratified by National Assembly in 2001. There is
great urgency  to revise the law to include provisions protecting essence of
freedom.
Article  49 of the Constitution of the Republic  of Azerbaijan  regulates
freedom of assembly. The Constitution stipulates freedom of assembly  for
everybody. It  says "everybody", and the  notion should be  accepted  as
including not only  Azerbaijani citizens, but also everybody  living in the
country irrelevant of citizenship, as well as the persons without citizenship.
Section 2 of the Article  reads: "Everybody  is entitled  to live  peacefully,
armlessly, hold gatherings, meetings, demonstrations, street  processions,
pickets". The article has directly    indicated forms and directions of
realization of the freedom  of assembly. It has openly stipulated that
everybody wishing to freely  assemble, is entittled to peacefully  and freely
assemble by  advance warning of the relevant state body. Apparently,
"warning relevant  state body" does not necessiate "getting permission" for
free assembly, it simply enables state bodies to conduct security  measures.
The side wishing to freely assemble should be able to hold gathering in the
place it determines by warning. It shouldn't wait for days for reaction of the
relevant executive power to that warning. From  this viewpoint, demanding
permission from those entitled to freely  assemble is contradicting
Constitution. The methods and  essence  of free  assembling are  also directly
indicated  in the Constitution.  Forms  of  gatherings  have been separately
pointed out. Those who wish to freely  assemble, can arrange gatherings,
meetings, demonstrations, street processions, or pickets. But in  all  cases,
these gatherings should be held in peaceful and armless form.
Separately, Article 11 of the European Convention on Protection of Human
Rights and Main Freedoms,  ratified by Azerbaijan  in 2001, has  legally
guaranteed the right to Free Assembly and Right to Association. This article
specifies:
1. Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and to freedom of
association with others, including the right to form and to join trade unions
for 
the 
protection 
of
his 
interests.

127
2. No restrictions shall be placed on the exercise of these rights other than
such as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in
the  interests of  national  security  or public  safety, for the prevention of
disorder or crime,  for the protection of health or morals or for the
protection of the rights and freedoms of  others. This Article  shall  not
prevent the imposition of lawful restrictions on the exercise of these rights
by members of the armed forces, of the police or of the administration of the
State.
Apparently, the first part of the article describes freedom of assembly  and
association and the second part discloses on which basis and terms can this
freedom be restricted.
The most serious problem in exercising the right to freedom of assembly
and association is that legal grounds behind the restrictions are sometimes
used for obstructing freedoms. Official bodies' sometimes try  to eliminate
freedom by referring in practice to restriction not freedom itself.
Article  11 of the Convention is expressing in  limited  form the  cases when
states can limit  the specified freedom. Limited because the  cases are
concrete and  cannot  be  expanded through interpretation. It  should be
particularly realized correctly. Azerbaijan is a state which adopted the
Convention and  applies jurisdiction of the European  Court  of Human
Rights, and should properly refer this practice together with legislative
bodies, also the executive bodies which have to apply  these laws and
international law rulings. Like any other country which has joined the
Convention, Azerbaijan should not refer to other reasons than indicated here
while restricting free assembly  and should not expand these reasons.
Because it had undertaken this as national obligation.
Freedom of association and assembly can be restricted only on the basis of
Section 2 of Article 11 of the Constitution. They are:
for the sake of national secutiry and public order;
prevention from disorder and crime;
for protection of health and morality;
for protection of rights and freedoms of other people;
The last sentence of section 2 of Article 11 of the Convention reads that
"this Article  shall not  prevent the imposition of lawful restrictions on the
exercise of these rights by members of the armed forces, of the police or of

128
the  administration of  the  State " and  has indicated for member countries
which professions can have restrictions on freedom of assembly  and
association.
The  logic  behind this restriction is that persons involved in armed forces,
police and administrative state bodies are administering state bodies and
their joining with other  purposes would not  be  in  complaince  with state
administration and protection.
It's impossible to restrict persons' right to freedom of assembly  and
association in cases other  than  those indicated above. For instance,  it's
unacceptable to legally introduce the restriction by  state bodies’ workload,
insufficiency of sources, proximity of official buildings, others’ right to
leisure, arrangement of events and other reasons not indicated separately in
Section 2 of Article 11. Because Article 11 of the Convention does not
allow bringing such additional reasons and determines a very  clear
framework.
As clearly see from all the mentioned, restrictive norms in both the Election
Code and the Law on Freedom of Assembly which the Code refers to, has
brought the right to freely  assemble to self-damaging role and is direct
violation of constitutional rights, Article 11 of the European Convention, as
well as voting rights.
This point  is also being criticized in OSCE/ODIHR final  Report  dated
December 24, 2013: "This approach  means unnecessary restriction on
citizen's right to free assembly. Given that political contestants have limited
opportunity to campaign outside of the formal 22-day campaign period, this
interpretation further restricted  their ability  to reach out  to  voters.
Furthermore, contradictions in legal requirements caused confusion among
contestants as to the applicable procedures.
In order to further an open campaign environment and in line with previous
OSCE/ODIHR recommendations, the  restrictive  approach of  the executive
authorities regarding the allocation of official venues for the conduct of the
campaign should be reviewed. Contradictions between the Election Code
and the Law on Freedom of Assembly on the notification or application for
holding a public gathering should be eliminated and candidates should only
be required to notify executive  authorities of their intent to hold a
gathering”.

129
By recent amendments, the Election Code is limiting the circle of places for
election campaign placards during election and referendum campaigning. In
pracice, such placards are placed in front of each polling station. As polling
stations are mainly located in schools, these campaign placards can be glued
only onto boards situated in schoolyards.
Entrance to schoolyards is limited everywhere and school gates are closed at
the end of lesson hour, as well as on weekends. Not only voters, but also the
persons wishing to stick  the campaign materials on these boards during the
campaigning, face serious obstacles. Besides, such placards are prohibited to
be stick  on buildings, facilities and  rooms belonging to  state,  included into
state register and  considered  historical or cultural monuments. Election
campaign materials contradicting requirements of the  Civic Code  of the
Republic of Azerbaijan are also prohibited to be glued to buildings and
other faciities. The expression "contradicting requirements of Civic Code" is
also absolutely indefinite. Because the Civic Code does not include a special
requirement on placement of campaign materials.
Distribution and placement  of election campaign materials should be
absolutely  free, technical  regulations should not limit or eliminate
fundamental  voting right. Restricting norms in the  Code  should be
eliminated.
Administrative punishment for right to freedom of assembly
Allongside restricting use of right to free assembly, heavy punishments have
been imposed on those exercising this right. Article   298 of the
Administrative Offences Code lost its validity by the Law of the Republic of
Azerbaijan N 462-IVQD dated  November  2, 2012 and new regulatory
article was added. The article's essence was as follows:
“Article 298. V i o l a t i o n
o f
t h e
r e g u l a t i o n s
t o
o r g a n i z e
a n d
h o l d
g a t h e r i n g s ,
m e e t i n g s ,
d e m o n s t r a t i o n s , s t r e e t p r o c e s s i o n s a n d   p i c k e t s
Warning is issued and a fine from seven to thirteen  manats is imposed for
violating  legislative
regulations for holding  gatherings,  meetings,
demonstarions, street processions and pickets".
The new article introduced on November 2, 2012 read as follows:

130
Article 298. Violation of regulations of organizing and holding
gatherings
298.1. For the gathering organizer's  violating the norm defined by law for
holding gatherings, meetings, demonstrations, street   processions and
pickets -physical  persons are fined from one thousand and five  hundred
manats to three thousand manats, or according to situation of cases, taking
into consideration personality of the violator, community service from two
hundred hours to two hundred forty hours or administrative detention of
up to two months is applied, official persons are fined from three thousand
manats to six thousand manats, legal entities from fifteen thousand manats
to thirty thousand manats.
298.2.  For  participating  in gathering,  meetings,  demonstraton,  street
procession or picket organized not in compliance with regulations specified
by law – fine from three undred manats to six hindred manats, or
depending on conditions of  the  cases, taking into  consideration the
personality of violator, community service  from one  hundred  and sixty
hours to two  hundred  hours or administrative detention of  up  to two
months is applied.
The most remarkable point here is that while the maximum level of fine was
13 manats in 2012, now the amount has been increased to 30 thousand
manats. It has updated the record of all periods and has increased sanction
for one article by 2.307 times. They did not сonfine themselves to such a
rise of fine, have reinforced the article sanction by community service of up
to two hundred and forty hours or administrative sentence of up to two
months. The legislators did not confine to this and added a note: "Note: In
case actions stipulated in  articles 298.1 and 298.2 of  this Code  include
criminal signs, those actions result in criminal responsibility under relevant
articles of the  Criminal  Code  of  the Republic  of  Azerbaijan" – thus
stipulating execise of right to freedom of assembly  as the most dangerous
case and criminal action.
For elections to be held free and democratic, for voters to feel themselves
comfortable, the way to the right to free assmebly should be open. Whilst
people assemble peacefully and do not endanger society, imposition of
high amount of fine on them, involving them  in obligatory work and
limiting their freedoms should be unacceptable.  The sanction of this
article  should immediately  be reduced to the level that existed in  2012.

131
The way of using administrative resources should be  unambigiously
closed during campaigning, candidates should be deprived of their legally
recognized priviledges and opportunities irrelevant of their posts, equality
of all candidates should be ensured.
From the  start of elections, all  reconstruction, construction works,
refurbishment of facilities affecting citizen votes, should be  banned.
Except for cases of accidents, the period of expenditures pre-stipulated in
state and local budgets, should be banned from the start day of elections to
the day the results are declared.
Means of mass media in elections
Legal framework
Constitution stipulates freedom of expression, press freedom and freedom to
obtain information. However, libel  remains to be  a criminal act with
criminal responsibility of imprisonment of up to three years. Article 106 of
the Constitution and Article 323 of the Criminal Code prohibits dishonoring
or humilating President's honor and dignity  and imposes an unnecessary
restriction on freedom of expression contrary to international standards. See
the following:
Article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political
Rights, dated 1996 and Sections 13 and 47 of    the General
Comments of the UN Human Rights Commitee, dated 2011.
Makhmudov and Aghazadeh vs. Azerbaijan, Application No.
35877/04, Rulings of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR),
December  18, 2008, Lingens vs Austria, Application No. 9815/82,
ECHR rulings and other cases taken July 8, 1986.
Besides, civic defamation charges accompanied with disproportional
financial sanctions result in de facto shutdown of media outlets. Due to web-
pages remaining open  and lack of direct  censorship, Internet  is mostly
accepted as free space. However, detentions and persecution of online active
persons are  on the  rise. The  recent changes made to  the  Criminal  Code  on
June 4, 2013, factually   applied defamation provisions on Internet
information resources. The  above  changes were adopted  even though in
September,  2012, the  Presidential Administration asked the  Venice
Commission for help to  write  the  Law on Defamation within the  National
Action Plan to increase efficiency of protection of human rights and

132
freedoms in  Azerbaijan. See:  "Opinion on the  Legislation pertaining to  the
Protection against Defamation of the Republic  of Azerbaijan" posted on:
http://www.venice.coe.int/webforms/documents/?pdf=CDL-AD(2013)024-e
Besides, on June 12,  2012, the Parliament adopted amendments to laws on
"Obtaining information", "State  registration and state  register of  legal
entities" and "On  commercial secret". The mentioned changes applied
within legal framework, imposed unnecessary restrictions on Constitutional
rights to obtain information.
OSCE/ODIHR Election Observation Mission also mentioned the issue in its
Final  Report,  December  24, 2013: Consideration should be  given to
repealing criminal defamation provisions in  favour of civil  sanctions
designed to restore the  reputation harmed, rather than compensate  the
plaintiff or punish the defendant; sanctions should be strictly proportionate
to  the  actual  harm caused  and the  law should prioritize  the  use of  non-
pecuniary remedies.
Campaigning in media
Means of mass media have always been the most significant way  of
campaigning during elections and  referendum. Through these means,
candidates, political parties and referendum campaigning groups have
chance to reach to a major election audience within a short period of time
and  with less energy, introduce  themselves and explain their program  and
goal.
In comparision with 2003 Election Code, the amendment made June 2, 2008
to the Code further restricted opportunities, media platforms to be allocated
for candidates and campaigning groups were limited to public broadcasting.
Article  77.1 of the  Code  in  previous edition read that  all  broadcasters and
press outlets established by  state bodies, organizations and institutions,
financed through state budget, were obligated to allocate equal place for all
candidates and referendum  campaigning groups. The word "broadcasters"
was replaced by  "public  broadcasters" in 2008 and brought into an absurd
form and a seriously significant media platform  was seized from  the side
using passive voting right.
There  are  a  number of broadcasters and media  outlets established  and
funded by state in Azerbaijan. Upon acceptance to the Council of Europe in
2001, Azerbaijan undertook an obligation to abolish Azerbaijan State

133
Television and turn it into Public Television. However, the obligation was
not carried out. The State Television and radio was protected, maintained
and  even expanded. Particularly, after 2008, two more  state  televisions
(Idman Azerbaijan (Sports Azerbaijan) and Medeniyyet Azerbaijan (Culture
Azerbaijan)) and two regional TV and radios (Naxcivan State Television
and  Kanal 35 in Naxcivan) and two regional  radios (in Naxcivan) received
license and began operating. So the number of state TVs and radios reached
8. Today, ten TV and radios including Public televisions are funded through
state budget. Besides, the state  is annually  allocating soap-operas-assigned
millions of manats to private televisions from state budget. These donations
are regretfully not spent on publicly- important issues, public contribution to
political pluralism.
The  government's annual  financial aid to media is rising. In 2001, 65.5
million manats was expended on state media  from  state budget. This sum
equaled 76.8 million dollars in  2012, 82.9 million dollars in  2013, 84.2
million in  2014 and 84.8 million dollars in  2015. Even though millions are
spent  on state media  every year,  regretfully, these  televisions and  radios
simply  serve the government as a means of propaganda. Ways for other
political sides to use this opportunity are absolutely  closed. There is legal
opportunity  to campaign only on Public TV and radio. But in practice, the
legislative requirement  to  use this media  outlet  is used in a  limited way.
During 2010 parliamentary   elections pre-election campaign, curious
situation evolved as no party  or political bloc other than ruling party had
registered candidates from 60 constituencies. In case the requirement of the
law was applied, besides 8 state TV and radios in government hands, public
televisions and radio should also be  given  to  their disposal. The  situation
clearly  described the injustice of the regulation brought by legislation.
Having noticed that no political side except for ruling party  was entitled to
campaign in  public television and  radio, ruling YAP refused  to  campaign
alone in public television and radio. CEC put aside requirement of the law,
allocated 4- minute broadcast time to all individual candidates, without any
legal basis.
Legislative requirement was again brutally violated when the 4-minute time
was allocated. The requirement of article  80.5 of the Election Code  "Free
broadcasting time should be allocated at a time when broader audience can
watch"  was violated through CEC joint collaboration with Public TV  and
Radio management. The campaigning time in television was set at 18:00. It
is not "the  time when broader audience can watch" televisions. The prime-
time for televisions around the world covers from 19:30 to 20:00. Curiously,

134
the  end  of working time  is considered the most listened for radios as radio
listeners are mainly in cars. 18:00-20:00 is the most listened time for radios.
The  legislative  requirement  for radios was also violated at recent elections
and 21:00 was allocated for radio campaiging. So, radio campaign period
was set at prime time for TVs and at televisions- at prime time for radios,
the purpose was to have as little as possible audience to benefit  from
campaign process.
Another problem  was the volume of weekly campaign time being set at 3
hours. The daily norm did not exceed 25 minutes. Daily use of 25 minutes
during 3 weeks makes only  a total  of 540 minutes. In 2015, the broadcast
time Public TV should allocate will makes only 540 minutes. Dividing this
figure by the number of registered candidates, one candidate receives only 1
minute within 22 days. In 2010, 540 minutes divided by  741 persons
resulted only by 43 seconds for each candidate. In 2005, 2063 candidates
had only 15.7 seconds each. Allocating seconds of free broadcasting time to
individuals is not effective.
One of the    serious problems in pre-election campaign in media is
campaiging in private  televisions and radios. Legislation allows private
televisions and radios to act freely  as campaiging platform. As televisions
cannot operate freely, they  are not interested in election campaigning
process. They mainly reject participation in the process. Those participating
set abnormal price policy. During the recent elections, televisions set 3000-
3500 manat for one minute broadcasting. Even the Public TV price for one
minute was not less than 3000 AZN. Official paper "Azerbaijan" set 12.000-
20.000 AZN for  one election banner. The prices were several times higher
than commercial ads prices.
The   reason was due to Election Code not differentiating political
campaiginig material from commercial ads  for their public significance.
Democratic states have very clear norm in this regard. For instance, in USA,
political  ads should not  be  higher  than the  cheapest  ads within 24-hour
broadcasting. If at 3 A.M., one minute ads costs USD 200, then political ads
at prime-time should not cost higher than USD 200. Analysing taxes given
by TVs in Azerbaijan, we can witness that commercial ads are bought at
very  low prices. But political ads are set at extremely high prices. The
Election Code should urgently include such a regulation.
The Election Code does not entitle media to express position in connection
with elections. Namely this provision restricts televisions' news and other

135
programs to freely inform about campaiging. Besides, Election Code
recognizes media as  a means in pre-election campaign and  as  a result,
coverage of any campaign is de-facto identified with campaiging in favor of
any
candidate.
It
contradicts
the
Council
of
Europe
relevant
recommendations. CE recommendations note that   particularly during
election period, media and private broadcaster serving public interests,
should ensure fair, balanced and impatial coverage of election campaign
through  discussions,  interviews and debates,  as  well as news  and other
programs devoted to daily developments. See the Committe of Ministers
Recommendations (CM/REC(2007)15) to member states on media coverage
of election campaigns:
https://wcd.coe.int/ViewDoc.jsp?id=1207243&Site=CM&BackColorInterne
t=9999CC&BackColorIntranet=FFBB55&BackColorLogged=FFAC75#
OSCE election observation mission report read: "The Election Code should
address the right   of voters to receive comprehensive and diverse
information about political  alternatives through the  media. Public  service
media and private broadcasters should be legally  obliged to provide  fair,
balanced and impartial coverage of the election campaign in their news and
current  affairs programs. Such  provisions should be overseen by  an
independent body competent to conduct media monitoring".
Generally, OSCE/ODIHR Election Observation Mission's monitoring of
recent  presidential elections also mentioned that candidates did not  have
enough access to press, and there was lack of balanced and open exchange
of views for political opportunities. Restrictive legal framework and openly
disproportional coverage of the incumbent President's activity  within
campaign period further deepened the  inequal conditions for candidates. It
contradicts Section 7.8 of 1990 Copenhagen Document  of the  OSCE  and
limits voters' opportunity  to make informed choice. Section 7.8 of the
document requires that "participating states should provide that no legal or
administrative obstacle stands in the way of unimpeded access to the media
on a non-discriminatory basis for all political  groupings and individuals
wishing to participate in the electoral process".
Section  7.7  of OSCE  1990  Copenhagen  Document  also  declares  the
following  on  campaign  period: “Member  countries  should ensure ensure
that law and public policy work to permit  political campaigning to be
conducted in  a fair and free  atmosphere in  which  neither administrative
action, violence  nor intimidation bars the  parties and the  candidates from
freely presenting their views and qualifications, or prevents the voters from

136
learning and discussing them or from casting their vote free of fear of
retribution”.
As a result, the following changes should be made to the Code:
-
provisions requiring registration of candidate in 60 constituencies and
provision imposing other limitations should be eliminated;
-
all televisons and radios funded through state budget should allocate
broadcast time in election process in an obligatory way;
-
This time should not be less than 1 hour a day for every television and
radio and should be only at prime-time;
-
Paid broadcast time at private televisions, as well as public and state
broadcasters should have minimum limit, campaign hours  should be at
prime-time,  the highest level of the price should be set lower than the
cheapest commecial ad within latest month;
-
The highest price set at periodical press outlets, online resources, sites
and other media should be set less than the cheapest commercial ad;
-
From the start day of electons, "election period" regulations should
be applied in all TVs and radios, periodicals, other media resources' news
policy, both government and opposition should be given equal coverage in
news;
-
Balance should be ensured, a press group with equal participation of
sides should conduct controlling function;
-
Media bodies violating regulations should receive high fines and in
case  they do not follow the rules after fines, their broadcasting or
publication should be temporarily ceased till the end of the voting day.
F) REGISTRATION AND WORK OF OBSERVERS IN
ELECTIONS
Institute of observation is very  significant during elections in terms of
realizing elections' transparency  principle. Regretfully, observation is
impossible  without passing through a bureaucratic system via  the  current
Election Code. Actually, only  a non-governmental organization wishing to
carry  out observation mission in elections, should be accredited at the
Central Election Commission (CEC). To this end, it  should be enough for
NGO to submit relevant application and copy of state registration certificate
to CEC. CEC should itself be able to have a look at the document’s original
through the Justice Ministry   electronic registry. NGO itself should
determine dispatch of its observers for concrete polling stations and giving

137
them  relevant cards. The same regulation should be set for political parties
not participating in elections, but wishing to conduct observation.
The  Election Code requirement  for observers to  get  registered  at  relevant
election commissions should be applied only  to persons who want to
observe  elections at  their own initiatives. Such a  rule opens major
opportunities for organizations implementing observation mission to express
themselves before relevant instances (election commissions, courts, etc.).
Observers of political  parties participating in elections and wishing to
conduct observation (bloc of political parties) and candidates should not at
all get registered at election commissions. The observers appointed by these
subjects should conduct observation only with cards given by these subjects.
Because those subjects actually  get registered at election commissions and
re-registration of their observers at  election commissions is a  repeated
procedure.
Requring photo for observation card should be eliminated, because the card
is considered valid when submitted together  with  ID card and  for this
reason, there is no need for photos.
Observers' rights should be indicated concretely  and clearly  in legislation,
their rights should be expanded, they should be authorised to obtain copies
of voter lists, check lists, as well as parallel count of votes.
Legislation should unambiguously    specify as obligation reception of
opinions and acts compiled on elecion day by  observers and submitted to
relevant election commissions. Facts indicated in these documents should be
checked during the process of determining election results, urgent measures
should be taken in case of any  grounds, should be referred to as basis in
determination of election results.
During voting day, observer should use his/her right to be in voting room
of election station at any time of the  day, use dictophone and video
cameras, as well as other means of modern technology. The material
observers obtain during observaton via those technical means should be
considered as evidence obtained via legal way, relevant changes should be
made to Civic Procedural Code and Criminal Procedural Code. Records
of observation cameras should also be unconditionally considered  legally
obtained evidence for courts, these records should be critical at  any
dispute.

138
Legal force of the act compiled by observer should not be linked to other
persons' will and should be evaluated as one of direct evidences.
All norms on conduct of exit poll should be excluded from the Code, any
public  body  should freely  conduct  exit  poll  in any polling station and
constituency. As it carries public  control character over election process,
getting 
CEC
consent
is 
of 
absurd
nature.

139
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə