Seçkilərə dair qanunvericiliyin analizi: beynəlxalq normalar, problemlər və perspektivlər



Yüklə 5.01 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə13/15
tarix30.11.2016
ölçüsü5.01 Kb.
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15

September 2010
4
The applicant stood for the parliamentary  elections in 2005.
According  to the voting  results  of  ConEC she  obtained most of
voices and  indicated the  applicant  as “the  elected candidate”.
Moreover, according to the  PEC protocols the applicant had more
voices
than
indicated
by   ConECn.
Then
Central
Election
Commission (“the CEC”) issued a decision invalidating the election
results in electoral constituency  where the applicant stood as
candidate. The applicant lodged an appeal against this decision with
the Court of Appeal, arguing that  the findings in the CEC decision
were  wrong. The applicant further  complained that the CEC  had
failed to consider her rights granted under Articles 108.4 and 112.8
4
Kerimova v Azerbaijan,
http://bit.ly/1LoycMR

162
of the Electoral Code (stipulating possibility of ordering a recount of
the  votes and  to summon  her  as the  candidate;  and  hear her
explanation).
Lastly, the  applicant required.  But  the Court  of Appeal refused to
independently  examine the originals of the PEC and ConEC
protocols, and upheld the CEC decision by reiterating the findings
made  in  that  decision. The applicant  lodged a  cassation appeal. The
Supreme Court rejected the applicant's appeal.
After exhausting the domestic remedies, the Applicant applied to
ECtHR and claimed the violation of her right  to elections granted
under Article 3 of the Protocol 1.
The  Court has emphasised  that it is important  for the authorities in
charge    of electoral administration to function in   a transparent
manner and to maintain impartiality and independence from political
manipulation,
that
the
proceedings
conducted
by
them
be
accompanied by minimum safeguards against arbitrariness and that
their decisions are sufficiently  reasoned (para 45). Regarding the
Government argument where it    contended that    the impugned
decision on the  invalidation of election results was aimed at
protecting the  free expression of the voters' opinion from  illegal
interference and ensuring that only  the rightfully elected candidates
represented the  voters in  the  Parliament, the  Court  had  doubts as to
whether a practice of discounting all votes cast in an entire electoral
constituency  owing merely to the fact that irregularities have taken
place  in  some  polling stations, regardless of the  extent  of the
irregularities and their impact on the outcome of the overall election
results in the constituency, can necessarily be seen as pursuing a
legitimate aim for the purposes of Article 3. (para 46)
It is sufficiently clear from the material available in the case file that,
according to the copies of PEC protocols obtained by  the applicant
from each of the polling stations at the end of election day, the
applicant  received a  total  of 5,566 votes against H.'s [other
candidate`s] 3,992 votes. According to the ConEC protocol issued
on the basis of those PEC protocols, after some of those protocols
had  been tampered with, the applicant received 5,350 votes against
H.'s H.'s [other candidate`s] 4,091 votes. Thus, it is obvious that the
election results, as they stood both before and after the irregularities

163
involving illegal alterations to  protocols, showed  that the applicant
was the clear winner of the elections. Moreover, neither the CEC nor
the domestic courts hearing appeals  against its  decision, nor  the
Sumgayit City  Court, dealing with the criminal case concerning the
irregularities in question, ever found that any    of the illegal
alterations had been made to  assist  the applicant's cause. In such
circumstances, the Court  finds it hard to  understand the electoral
authorities' and the Government's position that these irregularities
had somehow made it “impossible  to determine the will of the
voters”  in  the entire constituency. In regard  with the CEC decision
invalidating the election results, the Court notes that as it contained
no specific description, no elaboration as to the nature of the alleged
infringements, was totally unsubstantiated. (paras 47-48)
The Court noted that, it agrees with the applicant that such a recount
was in any event redundant because it was possible to establish who
the  winning  candidate  even  despite
the  irregularities
was.
Nevertheless, the Court  finds alarming the CEC's failure to even
consider the possibility  of a recount before invalidating the election
results. The  Court considers that, in cases where illegal tampering
with
vote
counting
or
election
documents
may  affect
the
determination of the outcome  of the  elections, a  fair procedure  for
recounting votes where  such  a  recount is possible  is an important
safeguard of the fairness and success of  the entire election process.
Even under  Azerbaijani  legislation an election recount  was optional
and  not mandatory, in  the  present case  the  CEC  could have
considered the possibility of a recount before deciding on an outright
invalidation of the election results. (para 49)
The Court finds out that, it was improperly applied Article 106.3.6
of the  Electoral  Code (concerning recount  of votes), Article 170.2.2
(invalidating the election results in the entire constituency based on
the fact that the elections in two-fifths of the total number of polling
stations representing more than  one-quarter  of the constituency
electorate had been annulled),  and ignored  the requirements of
Article  114.5 of the  Electoral  Code (prohibiting invalidation of
election results at any level on the basis of a finding of irregularities
committed for the benefit of candidates who lost the election). In this
connection, the Court notes that the situation envisaged in Article
114.5 of the Electoral Code is the direct opposite of a situation
where irregularities are found to have been allegedly made to the

164
benefit  of the “winning”  candidate  (contrast Namat Aliyev). Neither
the CEC, nor the domestic courts dealing with the appeals against its
decision, made an attempt to determine in whose favour the alleged
irregularities had been made. However, they applied Article 114.5 of
EC. In any  event, the subsequent proceedings Sumgayit City Court
established that all the illegal alterations had been made exclusively
for the benefit of the applicant's opponents. (paras 50-51)
The Court notes that, the courts failed to adequately  address these
issues all of which rose by  applicant, they  refused to examine any
primary  evidences. As such, the manner of examination of the
applicant's appeals was ineffective.
The  Court emphasized  that, the authorities' inadequate  approach to
this matter brought about  a situation where the whole election
process in the entire electoral constituency  was essentially  single-
handedly sabotaged by two low-ranking electoral officials, who had
abused their position to make some changes to a number of election
protocols that were in their possession. By arbitrarily invalidating
the  election results because  of these  officials' actions, the domestic
authorities essentially  aided and abetted them in thwarting the
election. Such lack of concern for integrity  of the electoral process
from  within the electoral administration cannot be considered
compatible with the spirit of Article 3. (para 53)
Lastly, the Court concluded that, the annulment of the elections in
the applicant's constituency lacked any relevant reasons and was in
apparent    breach of the procedure established by   the domestic
electoral law (EC, article 114.5).
4. [Nadir] Orujov v. Azerbaijan, Application No. 4508/06, 26 July
2011
5
The applicant  applied to  ConEC and registered as an  independent
candidate for the forthcoming elections to the Parliament in 2005. In
the    course    of election period, the district    Police    Department
informed the ConEC that the applicant was privately funding certain
urban improvement works in some public areas of his constituency,
in breach of the requirements of the electoral law. To this effect, the
5
Orujov v Azerbaijan,
http://bit.ly/1MJG1Qp

164
records drew up by police was introduced to the ConEC. The ConEC
submitted the cancellation request to the Court of Appeal. According
to the applicant, he was not informed about the ConEC’s request in a
timely  manner. The Court of Appeal referring to the testimonies of
the  witnesses, whose  name  was indicated  in  the  records, came to
conclusion of the breach of the electoral law by  the Applicant,
therefore decided to   cancel the applicant’s registration as a
candidate. The applicant lodged a cassation appeal with the Supreme
Court  and  enclosed the  witness affidavits creating a different
situation, arguing that  the  evidence used against him  had been
fabricated, that the Court of Appeal  had made manifest errors in
examining the  evidence.  The Supreme  Court dismissed  the
applicant’s appeal and upheld the Court of Appeal’s judgment.
After exhausting the domestic remedies, the Applicant applied to
EctHR and claimed the violation of his right  to elections granted
under Article 3 of the Protocol 1.
The    Court noted that    in the present case the applicant was
disqualified as a candidate in accordance with Articles 88.4 and 113
of the Electoral Code, which provide for the possibility  of
disqualification of candidates who resort to unfair and illegal means
of gaining voter support. The  Court accepts the Government’s
argument  that  the conditions set  out  in  the  above-mentioned
provisions of the Electoral Code pursue the legitimate aim of
ensuring  equal and fair conditions for all candidates in the electoral
campaign and  protecting the  free  expression of the  opinion of the
people in  elections. It  remains to be  determined  whether there  was
arbitrariness or a lack of proportionality in the authorities’ decisions.
(Para 43-44)
The same time when the Court reiterated that its competence to
verify  compliance with domestic law is limited, nevertheless, the
Court considered that, in order to prevent arbitrary disqualification
of candidates, the relevant  domestic procedures should contain
sufficient safeguards protecting the candidates from  abusive and
unsubstantiated   allegations of electoral misconduct,   and that
decisions on disqualification should be based on sound, relevant and
sufficient
proof 
of
such
misconduct.
(Paras
45-46)

165
The court stated that, the decision to disqualify  the applicant was
based on the finding that he had provided free services to voters with
the aim of gaining their support, in the form of financing or carrying
out urban development works which consisted in laying fresh asphalt
and repairing public recreation facilities for children  and for the
elderly  in some areas of the electoral constituency. The only
evidentiary basis for reaching this finding were several very short
statements by random residents of the area and statements by two
police officers. However, in the Court’s opinion, it is unlikely  that
someone could sponsor/carry  out large-scale urban development
works in public  areas, in plain view of the public  without the
existence of strong material evidence (including at least:  proof of
financial transactions carried out by the applicant in connection with
the works, contracts signed between the applicant and a construction
company    or
construction
workers,
statements
from
these
construction workers showing their links to the applicant, statements
by  witnesses who have directly observed the applicant issuing
instructions concerning the works to be carried out, and so on).
The  Court considered that  the procedure for finding the applicant
responsible  for electoral misconduct  did not  afford him  sufficient
guarantees against arbitrariness. The  Court  also noted  that all  the
evidence relating to the alleged misconduct by  the applicant was
produced with the direct involvement   of the   police. Such an
initiative by  the police as interfering in electoral matters is in itself
rather unusual.
Examining the case issues in  accurate manner,  the  Court  found the
statements of “residents” addressed to the police  in a manner rather
unusual  (were  not  worded  as complaint  letters but  as letters of
praise; it is also unusual that anyone express his or her gratitude to
the applicant by means of a letter addressed to the police). Some of
the “witnessed  residents” made  notarised  affidavits formally
retracting their  written  statements to  the police,  and  explaining that
they  had been essentially  tricked by  the police into making those
original statements. Some others stated that they had no prior
knowledge as to who had commissioned the renovation works. With
the  exception of the  two police  officers, none  of the  witnesses
testified against the applicant during the judicial  hearings, only  two
witnesses, namely police officers positively  identified the applicant
[as the person who had allegedly commissioned the renovation

166
works in    question]. However, their statements appeared to   be
hearsay evidence, in essence, appear to have been nothing more than
a rumour. In the course of the proceedings in Supreme Court from
the information gathered by the applicant, some of these “residents”
were not  residents of the area in question, but these evidences were
not  examined.  The applicant  left  without  informing in  a  timely
manner. The decision of ConEC was actually  taken post facto, one
day  after the request had been sent to the Court of Appeal. The
examination of the issue took place in such unreasonable  time-
constraints not  affording much  time  to  examine  the material in  the
case file, and left him unprepared making unable to prepare/procure
arguments. In its judgment the  Court of Appeal misrepresented the
statements of certain witnesses. The  Supreme  Court refused to take
the applicant`s submissions into account. (para 47-58)
In result, the  Court concluded that the applicant’s disqualification
from  running  for election was not  based on sufficient  and relevant
evidence,  the  procedures of the  electoral  commission and  the
domestic  courts did not  afford  the  applicant  sufficient  guarantees
against arbitrariness.
5. [Arif] Hajili v. Azerbaijan, Application No. 6984/06, 10 January
2012
6
The applicant stood for the elections to the parliament as a candidate.
There were a total of forty-one polling stations in the constituency.
At  the end of  election  day, according to the copies  of  the PEC
records in the applicant’s possession, he received the majority of
votes in the constituency. After voting he lodged a complaint with
the  Central Electoral Commission (“the CEC”), claiming that,  after
the  submission of all  the  PEC records of results to  the  ConEC, the
PEC records for three Polling Stations had been falsified in favour of
one  of his opponents. CEC  had  issued a  decision to invalidate  the
election results for the entire Election Constituency  where the
applicant stood as candidate. It was substantiated such as there were
violations in 19 polling stations. The applicant lodged an appeal
against that decision with the Court of Appeal, arguing that while the
CEC decision stated that “impermissible alterations” had been made
to the results records of nineteen PECs, in reality such alterations
6
Hajili v Azerbaijan,
http://bit.ly/1JAAGKy

167
had been made to the records of only three PECs. As for the PEC
records for other  polling stations, the  photocopies of the  same  PEC
records which were in his possession did not contain any  such
alterations or changes. The  Court of Appeal did not independently
examine the originals of the PEC and the ConEC records of results
or hear witnesses called by  the applicant; and upheld the CEC
invalidating decision by    reiterating the findings made in that
decision. The applicant lodged a cassation appeal,  in addition
referred the possibility  of ordering a recount of the votes. The
Supreme Court rejected the applicant’s appeal.
After exhausting the domestic remedies, the Applicant applied to
EctHR and claimed the violation of his right  to elections granted
under Article 3 of the Protocol 1.
The  Court has emphasised  that it  is important  for the authorities in
charge    of electoral administration to function in   a transparent
manner and to maintain impartiality and independence from political
manipulation,
that
the
proceedings
conducted
by
them
be
accompanied by minimum  safeguards against arbitrariness and that
their decisions are sufficiently reasoned. (Para 48)
For the present case the Court noted that it has previously examined
a complaint based on very similar facts, in the Kerimova judgment.
However, it observes that, unlike the Kerimova judgment, where it
was apparent from the established facts that the applicant would
have  won the  election had  the  election results not  been invalidated
arbitrarily, in the present  case it  is not possible  to establish with
certainty  that the applicant would have won the election in his
electoral constituency. In this respect, the Court noted the subsidiary
nature of its role and noted that, it is not the Court’s task to take on
the function of a first-instance tribunal of fact. In this connection, the
Court also reiterated that Article 3 of Protocol No. 1 guarantees not a
right to win the election per se, but a right to stand for election in
fair and democratic conditions. (Para 49)
The Curt noted that, the CEC decision followed a relevant request by
the    applicant    complaining about    alleged    irregularities in three
polling stations. However, the CEC decision went manifestly beyond
what had been requested of it by  the applicant and invalidated the
election results in a greater number of polling stations, resulting in

168
an invalidation of the election results in the constituency as a whole.
Such decision constituted an  interference  with the  applicant’s
effective exercise of his right to stand for election. It remained to be
determined  whether this interference was compatible  with  the
requirements of Article 3 of Protocol 1.
The  Court  considered  that, the  decisions of domestic authorities
were not in compliance with Article 3, for essentially  the same
reasons as those in the Kerimova judgment. The  CEC decision
contained no specific description, and failed to substantiate in which
way  these “irregularities” had somehow influence the will of the
voters”  in  the entire constituency. In regard  with the  CEC decision
was totally unsubstantiated. Like in the Kerimova case, the CEC and
the  domestic courts failed to  follow a  number  of procedural
safeguards provided by   the domestic electoral law, without
explaining the  reasons for that omission. Firstly, the  CEC  failed to
consider the possibility of a recount and did not give any explanation
of the reasons for such failure/passing up. Secondly, the Court notes
that  the domestic authorities ignored the requirements of Article
114.5 of the Electoral Code,
Lastly, despite the fact that the applicant had repeatedly raised all of
the  above  points in his appeals to the  domestic courts, the  domestic
courts failed to adequately  address these issues and reiterated the
CEC’s findings (para 56).
Court  concluded  that  the decision on the annulment  of the election
results in the applicant’s electoral constituency  was arbitrary, as it
lacked any  relevant and sufficient reasons and was in apparent
breach of the procedures established by the domestic electoral  law
(see  Article 114.5, EC). This decision arbitrarily  prevented the
applicant from exercising effectively his right to stand for election
and as such ran counter to the concern to maintain the integrity and
effectiveness of an electoral procedure aimed at identifying the will
of the people through universal suffrage (para 57).
6. Mammadov v. Azerbaijan (No.2), Application No. 4641/06, 10
January 2012
7
7
Mammadov v Azerbaijan (No 2),
http://bit.ly/1PrsAlA

169
The  applicant  stood for the elections to the parliament in 2005, and
according to the applicant, he received the majority  of votes in the
constituency. At the end of the election day, but the applicant was
not provided with a copy of the ConEC record of election results.
The ConEC did not officially  declare a winner. The applicant
applied to  the  Central  Electoral  Commission (“the  CEC”) with a
request for the  invalidation of the  election results in  eight  polling
stations in total, for which the applicant did not receive PEC records,
and to declare the applicant the winner, as he obtained of the highest
number  of votes in the  constituency. The CEC  issued a  decision to
invalidate the election results for the  entire constituency. . The
applicant  lodged an appeal  against that decision with the Court  of
Appeal, arguing that while the CEC findings were wrong. The Court
of Appeal refused independently examine the originals of the records
of results,  and upheld  the CEC invalidating  decision. The  applicant
lodged  a cassation appeal, in  addition challenged that  the court  of
appeal  did not  examine  evidence. The Supreme  Court  rejected  the
applicant’s appeal and upheld the appellate court`s decision.
After exhausting the domestic remedies, the Applicant applied to
EctHR and claimed the violation of his right  to elections granted
under Article 3 of the Protocol 1.
For the present case the Court noted that it has previously examined
a complaint based on very similar facts, in the Kerimova judgment.
However, it  observes that, unlike the Kerimova judgment, in the
present case it is not possible to establish with certainty that the
applicant  would have  won the election in his electoral constituency
had  the election results not been invalidated  arbitrarily. In this
respect, due to the subsidiary nature of its role, it is not the Court’s
task to determine this. In this connection, Article 3 of Protocol No. 1
guarantees not a right to win the election per se, but a right to stand
for election in fair and democratic conditions. (para 52)
CEC invalidation decision went manifestly  beyond what had been
requested of it by the applicant and resulting in an invalidation of the
election results in the constituency  as a whole. Such decision
constituted  an interference with  the applicant’s effective  exercise of
his 
right
to 
stand 
for
election. 
(paras 
53-54)

170
The  Court  considered  that, the  decisions of domestic authorities
were not in compliance with Article 3, for essentially  the same
reasons as those in the Kerimova judgment. The CEC decision
contained no specific description, and failed to substantiate in which
way  these “irregularities” had somehow influence the will of the
voters”  in  the entire constituency. In regard  with the  CEC decision
was totally unsubstantiated. Like in the Kerimova case, the CEC and
the  domestic courts failed to  follow a  number  of procedural
safeguards provided by   the domestic electoral law, without
explaining the  reasons for that omission. Firstly, the  CEC  failed to
consider   the possibility of   a recount and did not give any
explaination of the reasons for such failure/passing up. Secondly, the
domestic authorities ignored the requirements of Article 114.5 of the
Electoral Code. (paras 57-58).
The  court also noted that, despite  the fact  that  the  applicant  had
repeatedly  raised all of the above points in his appeals to the
domestic courts, they failed to adequately address these issues and
reiterated the CEC’s findings (para 59).
In a result, the Court concluded that the decision on the annulment of
the election results in the constituency  was arbitrary, as it was in
apparent  breach of the the domestic electoral  law. There has
accordingly been a violation of Article 3.
7. Kerimli and Alibeyli v. Azerbaijan
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə