Seçkilərə dair qanunvericiliyin analizi: beynəlxalq normalar, problemlər və perspektivlər



Yüklə 5.01 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə12/15
tarix30.11.2016
ölçüsü5.01 Kb.
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15
participate in the groups
’s discussion  of evidences. The investigation
process held by the expert group should be open for observers.
-
Extension of three-day requirement for investigation of complaint for
another three days should be removed;
-
Even if three-day requirement to submit the complaint has passed, this
period should be reinstated in the manner established for courts in case
if the applicant has objective cause;

151
-
Criminal   liability should be   established for not investigating or
avoidance of investigating as well as for not fulfilling the duties set forth
by the legislation for investigating the complaints;
-
Except for the applicant
’s fault or voluntary refusal, non-participation
of the  applicant in the  investigation process should be the basis for
cancellation of the decision regarding that particular case.
-
Sanctions for  actions  violating  the election  rights  which  are considered
administrative  offense or criminal case should be hardened. Moreover,
unavoidability of liability should be ensured;
-
Election subjec
ts’ opportunities to  appeal  to  the  court on irregularities
regarding the  election rights of administrative  offense nature should be
expanded,  handling of these irregularities should be  simplified and be
prompt;
-
Norms for considering results of elections invalid should be more
specified, and   the requirement for approval of election results by the
Constitutional Court should be cancelled.
4. Election campaign
Paragraph 1.1. of the “Regulation on the Press  Group formed under the
Central Election Commission of the Republic  of Azerbaijan to  control  the
observance  of the  rules for the  conduct  of pre-election (pre-referendum)
campaign in mass media” approved by  Decision 5/33 in June 05, 2013 of
Central Election Commission of the Republic  of Azerbaijan is in
inconsistence with the legislation. While Article 74.5 of the Electoral Code
(74.5. A  press group established under the Central Election Commission,
comprised mostly of journalists, shall ensure the observance of the rules on
pre-election  campaigning  identified by this  Code.) does not express the
representation of the  commission members in  the group. In such case,
establishing representation of the commission members in the group by the
“Regulation”  puts the  group under the commission’s prerogative  power. It
means composition of media group under this requirement puts its activities
under the control of relevant election commission, particularly  of the
chairperson  of  election  commission.  This  is  how  the media group  is  not
independent during the investigation of irregularities and appeals and cannot
demonstrate  unbiased position, while  independence  of this group is very
important for it to be able to control the process fairly and impartially.
As it  is stated in paragraph 2.1 of the Regulation (2.1. Head of the Press
Group shall be elected by members of the Group from members of the CEC
with decisive voting right.), involvement of the CEC member with decisive

152
voting right  as the leader of the media group as well  as controlling the
group’s activities put the independence of the group under a doubt. It would
be more appropriate and reasonable to select a coordinator among the group
members.  Investigation  of appeals and irregularities  under this method as
well as adopting decision in this regard will be followed by  conflict of
interests, because members of the election commission as members of the
media group prepare an  Opinion about the results of investigation and also
participate  in the meetings of the  election commission while making
decision regarding the Opinion.
On another hand, the “Regulation” is not clear about the number of
members as well as of formation of the group.
(2. Formation and rules for the organization of activity of the Press Group
2.1. Head of the Press Group shall be elected by members of the Group from members of
the CEC with decisive voting right.
2.2. In  the case of  the absence of  the head of  the Press  Group,  one of  its  members
implements duties of the head with his/her charge.
2.3. Press Group shall discuss and settle the issues within its competence in collegial form
at the sessions.
2.4. In the case  when 2/3 part of Press Group members participate  in the  session, then  it
should be considered authoritative.
2.5. The decisions concerning the issues discussed shall be adopted by simple majority of
vote.)
The media group equally formed of election subjects should have the
function of controlling election campaign activities on media.
The applicants should be invited to the investigation process by the media
group for them to be able to submit  their complaints as well as to
participate in the grou
p’s discussion  of evidences. The investigation
process held by the media group should be open for observers.
Number of members of the media group, rules for its formation, as well as
its functions should be clearly recorded in the act of the Commission.
5. Web camera
Paragraph 1.1. of the “Rules on installation and  use of web cameras in
election precincts” approved by  Decision 5/31 in June 05, 2013,
amended by  the Decision # 1/5 in May 29, 2014 of Central Election
Commission of the  Republic  of Azerbaijan states that `a  new
technological means – web camera (hereafter referred to as camera) will

153
be used in order to ensure extensive implementation of transparency, to
increase public confidence in elections by watching the voting process
on voting day by  wide public.` Given that, certralized video recordings
should be   available   as evidence   to all election subjects when
investigating the complaints. While  the paragraph 2.6. of these “Rules”
mentiones it, it is still not very much clear and specific on how   this
video records would be obtained and used as evidence.

2.6. All video images  obtained during the cameras’ functioning period shall be
recorded  in a centralized manner. Such video records can be  used as evidence while
investigating the complaints and storage  of these video records for 5 years shall be
guaranteed by the installing party.
The exeprience proves that video recordings are de-facto impossible for
the applicants to obtain.
Video
records
from
the   web   cameras
istalled
for
ensuring
transparency,  increasing public  confidence  in elections should be
available  to all election subjects, and use  of such records as evidence
while investigating the complaints should be precisely expressed in the
Rules.
6. Status of authorized representatives
Paragraph 2.2. of the “Instruction on the status of  the authorized
representatives of the candidate, political parties, blocs of political party and
referendum campaign groups in elections (referendum) of the Republic of
Azerbaijan” approved by  Decision 7/27-2 in July  18, 2008 of the Central
Election Commission of the Republic of Azerbaijan, amended by Decision
6/58 inn June 18, 2013, contradicts the requirements of Article 74 of the
Electoral Code.
The Instruction:
...
2.2. It shall be prohibited for authorized representatives of candidates, political parties or
political party blocs, campaign groups on referendum to do the following actions:
...
2.2.11. to campaign among voters;
2.2.12. to act or call directed in support of this or other candidate and political party,
political party bloc (question put under referendum) or that can be valued as their support;

154
The Electoral Code:
Article 74. Conduct of a Pre-election (Pre-referendum) Campaign
74.1. Pre-election campaigning shall be held  in accordance with Article 47 of the
Constitution of the  Republic  of Azerbaijan. The following shall have  the right to conduct
pre-election and pre-referendum campaigns (hereinafter pre-election campaign):
74.1.1. Referendum campaign groups;
74.1.2. Candidates registered for participation in the elections of deputies to the Milli
Majlis;
74.1.3. Candidates registered for participation in Presidential elections;
74.1.4. Political parties or blocs of political parties, which have candidates registered for
participation in the elections of deputies to the Milli Majlis;
74.1.5. Candidates registered for participation in the municipal elections;
74.1.6. Political parties or blocs of political parties, which have candidates registered for
participation in Presidential elections; and
74.1.7. Political parties  or blocs of political  parties, which havecandidates registered for
participation in municipal elections.
...
74.4. Conduct of pre-election campaigning and distribution of campaign materials shall be
prohibited for:
74.4.1. Subjects indicated in Article 90.2 of this Code (taking into account Articles 12.2 and
12.3 of this Code);
74.4.2. Officials who while performing or abusing their status as employees of government
bodies, agencies or organizations or persons who hold high posts at the municipal agencies
or organizations, civil and municipal servants, and military personnel;
74.4.3. Election commissions, the members of an election commission with decisive voting
rights, and other election commission officials;
74.5. A press group established under the Central Election Commission, comprised mostly
of journalists, shall ensure the observance of the rules on  pre-election campaigning
identified by this Code.
As it  is clearly mentioned in the requirements of the Electoral Code,
candidates, political parties and  bloc  of political  parties have  the  right to
campaign, and this means that politial parties and bloc of political parties
can participate in election campaign through their authorised representatives
empowered to  represent  the  party. Moreover, the Electoral Code  is clear
about  the list of subjects who are prohibited to conduct election campaign.
Given that, prohibition of conduct of pre-election campaign by  authorized
representatives established by the “Instruction” is          the violation of
legislation and it will provide obstractions to enjoy the active suffrage.
Thus, the issues mentioned above  prove that adoption of relevant acts of
statutory  nature by the CEC violates Articles 1.4.1. and 4.4. of the
Constitutional Law “On Normative Legal Acts” as well as paragraphs 1.4.,
1.5. and 2.1. of the “Rules for development and passage of acts of statutory
nature by the Central Election Commission of the Republic of Azerbaijan”.

155
Part III
THE SUMMARY
of the precedent cases of
THE EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS (ECTHR)
in respect of
Azerbaijan Republic
related to
the Article 3 of the Protocol 1 (right to free and fair elections) to
the
European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and
Fundamental Freedoms (ECHR)
After the  Republic of Azerbaijan (AR) became member of the
Council of Europe (CoE) in 2001, it joined the ECHR, by following
the obligations taken before CoE, and on 15 April 2002, ratified the
ECHR.    Since that    date, AR    citizens have    entitled to submit
complaint applications to ECtHR according to the ECHR.
In the mentioned period, complaints in  various characters and
regarding  different violations were  submitted. Some  of these
applications are regarding the right  of free elections granted under
Article 3 of the Protocol 1 of the ECHR.
According to the Article 3 of the Protocol 1:
The High Contracting Parties shall hold free elections at reasonable
intervals by secret ballot,  under conditions which  will  ensure free
expression of  the  opinion of  the  people  in  the  choice of  the
legislature.
It should be noted that, Article 3 of the Protocol 1 is restricted with
the elections to the legislature (in the case of Azerbaijan it`s  Milli
Majlis) and ECtHR is limited to examination of the applications
concerning
elections
held 
for 
this 
body.

156
During the  mentioned  period, among the  decisions on complaints
related to Article 3 of the Protocol 1 regarding Azerbaijan Republic,
ECtHR passed judgements on 12 cases founding out violations.
These cases will be mentioned here below in chorological order and
analyzed summary on these cases will be presented at the end.
1.
Seyidzade v. Azerbaijan, Application No. 37700/05, 3
December 2009
1
The present applicant is a religious clergyman. He was resigned
from all of his professional religious positions in order to participate
in 2005 Parliamentary Elections. In accordance with the provisions
of the laws of AR on contesting the positions, the clergyman is not
allowed to use the right to passive election. Despite the fact that the
applicant has already  resigned from all relevant positions, the
Constituency Election Commission (ConEC), thereafter the Central
Election Commission (CEC) and the courts refused from  the
registration of his candidacy  substantiating that, his resignation did
not excluding his activity as a clergyman.
After exhausting the domestic remedies, the Applicant applied to
ECtHR and claimed the violation of his right  to elections granted
under the Article 3 of the Protocol 1.
ECtHR found out the violation of the right  to elections of the
Applicant granted under the Article 3 of the Protocol 1. ECtHR ruled
that, while the Contracting States enjoy   a wide margin of
appreciation regarding Article 3 (see paras 27, 29), such restrictions
should be  in  compliance  with two criteria:  whether there  has been
arbitrariness or a lack of proportionality, and whether the restriction
has interfered with the free expression of the opinion of the people.
2
1
Seyidzade v Azerbaijan,
http://bit.ly/1E9jn0B
2
The  Court has established  that this provision guarantees individual rights,
including the rights to vote and to stand for election. As important as those rights
are, they are not, however, absolute. Since Article 3 recognises them without
setting them out  in express terms,  let alone defining them, there is room for
“implied limitations”, and contracting States have a wide margin of appreciation in
this sphere. In their internal legal orders, they may make the rights to vote and to
stand for election subject to conditions which are not in principle precluded under
Article 3. The concept of “implied limitations” is of major importance for the

157
Implementing the general  principles to the  present  case, ECtHR
came to conclusion that, the primary  issue in dispute in the present
case - the alleged non-foreseeability and arbitrariness of the measure
taken. Accordingly, the problem was in the quality  of the law on
which this restriction was based (see para.32)
In this connection, the Court reiterated that a rule is “foreseeable” if
it is formulated with sufficient precision to enable any individual – if
need be with appropriate advice – to regulate his conduct (para. 33).
The Court noted that, indeed, regard being had to the literal wording
of the  various relevant  provisions of domestic law, the latter may
appear to be mutually  inconsistent on the point whether clergymen
were deprived of their passive electoral rights, or whether they were
only  subject to disqualification due to simultaneously holding
incompatible positions.  In  particular, Article 85  (II) of  the
Constitution and Articles 13 and 144 of the Electoral Code, Article
14.2.4 of the Electoral Code and Article 5 of the Law on Freedom of
Religion. In this connection, the Court also noted that the same legal
provisions, and in  particular Article 14.2 of the Electoral Code,
provided for restrictions of electoral rights not only  of the
“clergymen”,  but also other categories of persons such as civil
servants, under essentially  the same wording. However, the Court
noted  that  there have  been cases where civil  servants were actually
registered as candidates for the same parliamentary elections in 2005
where they  had submitted an undertaking to resign from the State
service if elected and had been temporarily  released from their
official functions during the election period. (para 34)
determination of the relevance of the aims pursued by the restrictions on the rights
guaranteed by this provision. Given that Article 3 of Protocol No. 1 is not limited
by a specific list of “legitimate aims” such as those enumerated in Articles 8-11,
the States are therefore free to rely on an aim not contained in that list to justify a
restriction, provided that this aim is compatible with the principle of the rule of
law and the general objectives of the  Convention. Moreover, in examining
compliance with Article 3 of Protocol No. 1, the Court does not apply the tests of
“necessity” or “pressing social need”; instead, it has focused mainly  on two
criteria: whether  there has been arbitrariness or  a  lack of  proportionality, and
whether the restriction has interfered with the free expression of the opinion of the
people.

158
The  Court  noted that  the  Government  have  not  submitted  any
examples of domestic  practice  or judicial  rulings showing the
existence  of a  comprehensive  and  consistent  interpretation of the
scope of the above-mentioned domestic legal provisions in respect of
“clergymen”. (para 35)
The  Court  found that,  indeed, the  domestic  law did not  provide for
any definition of who qualified as “clergymen” and what constituted
“professional religious activity”. The existence of a large variety of
religious denominations which organise themselves internally in
different ways may potentially result in different views as to who
can be considered as a “clergyman” in respect of a specific religion,
faith or belief. Moreover, since the term “religious activity” is rather
ambiguous and  lends itself  to  quite  a broad  interpretation. The
connotations of the term “professional” as used with the  term
“religious activity” are  also unclear. The  domestic  courts in  the
present case have not provided any  definition or clarification either
(para 36).
In such circumstances, the  Court  finds that  the  domestic  legislation
providing for the impugned  restriction was not  foreseeable as to its
effects and left considerable room for speculation as to the definition
of the categories of persons affected by  it. The relevant legal
provisions were not sufficiently  precise to enable the applicant to
regulate his conduct and foresee which  specific types of activities
would entail a restriction of his passive electoral rights. (para 37)
In conclusion, the Court notes that the legal definition of the
category of persons affected by the impugned restriction was too
wide and imprecise. In addition, the application of the law in respect
of the applicant resulted in a situation where the very essence of the
rights guaranteed by Article 3 of Protocol No. 1 was impaired.
Note: In the case of Ittihadi-Islam, ECtHR referring to Seyidzade
case as a    presedent, and  concluded that, neither   the   Law on
Non-Governmental Organisations provided any kind of definition of
what constituted “religious  activity”.  paras  47-49  ot that decision)

159
2. Namat Aliyev v. Azerbaijan, Application No. 18705/06, 08 April
2010
3
The applicant on the present case is a professional politic. He stood
for the parliamentary  elections in 2005 as a candidate of the
opposition bloc Azadliq for the single-mandate Barda City Electoral
Constituency no. 93. According to the ConEC protocol drawn up
after election day, one of the applicant's opponents, Z.O. obtained
the  highest  number of votes cast  and the  Applicant  was the second
after him. Immediately  after elections, the applicant submitted
identical  complaints to  the  ConEC and  the  Central Electoral
Commission (CEC), in  which  he claimed of numereous violations
(inter alia that, the local authorities openly  campaigned in his
opponent`s favour  and  coercing voters to  vote  for him, Z.O.'s
supporters intimidated  voters, in  several  polling stations, observers
were harassed or excluded from   the voting area,
there were
instances of multiple  voting and  ballot-box stuffing,  the  authorities
failed to include some resided citizens into voters lists). In support of
his claims, the  applicant  submitted affidavits (akt) of election
observers, audio tapes and  other  evidence.
CEC  dismissed  the
complainst using general formulation for justification. The applicant
appealed to domestic courts. The courts dismissed his complaints as
well.
After exhausting the domestic remedies, the Applicant applied to
EctHR and claimed the violation of his right  to elections granted
under Article 3 of the Protocol 1.
The  Court noted that, the conditions to the right to vote must not
thwart  the free expression of the people  in the choice of the
legislature – in other words, they must reflect, or not run counter to,
the concern to maintain the integrity and effectiveness of an electoral
procedure aimed at identifying the will  of the people through
universal  suffrage (para 71) Furthermore, the object and purpose of
the  Convention, which  is an instrument for the  protection of human
rights, requires its provisions to be interpreted and applied in such a
way  as to make their stipulations not theoretical or illusory  but
practical and effective (para 72) Lastly, the Court has also  had an
occasion to emphasise that it is important for the authorities in
3
Namat Aliyev v Azerbaijan
,
http://bit.ly/1TZdPNK

160
charge    of electoral administration to function in   a transparent
manner and to maintain impartiality and independence from political
manipulation (para 73).
The Court will first had regard to the Government's argument that
the difference in the official vote totals received by  Z.O. and the
applicant  was so significant  that, even if the  applicant's allegations
concerning some  election irregularities in  various polling stations
were true, it would not affect the ultimate result of the election. The
Court    cannot accept    this argument. In order    to    arrive at    the
conclusion proposed by  the Government, it is first necessary  to
separately  assess the seriousness and magnitude of the alleged
election irregularity  prior to determining its effect on the overall
outcome of the election. However, the question whether this has
been done  in  a diligent manner  is a major point  of contention
between the parties in the context of the present    complaint.
Moreover, in any event, what is at stake in the present case is not the
applicant's right to win the election in his constituency, but his right
to stand freely and effectively for it. The applicant was entitled under
Article 3 of Protocol No. 1 to stand for election in fair and
democratic conditions, regardless of whether ultimately  he won or
lost. (Paragraphs 74-75).
Although the Court, owing to the subsidiary nature of its role, noted
that it  cannot assume a fact-finding role, the evidence presented by
the  applicant  in  support  of his claims can be  considered  strong and
whether they had amounted to irregularities capable of thwarting the
free expression of the opinion of the people.
The Court also had regard to the Final Report of the OSCE/ODIHR
Election Observation Mission concerning the elections and noted
that, while it was not direct relating exclusively  to the applicant's
constituency,
similar  irregularities
observed
in
most
of the
constituencies. The Court considered that  the applicant has put
forward a very serious and arguable claim disclosing an appearance
of a failure to hold free and fair elections in his constituency (paras
77-79).
The   Court
emphasised
that,
where
complaints
of
election
irregularities had been addressed at the domestic level, the Court's

161
examination should be limited to verifying whether any arbitrariness
could be detected in the domestic court procedure and decisions.
This right would be illusory  if, any competent domestic body
capable of effectively dealing with the matter.
The  Court  noted that, the applicant  appealed both  to Con.EC  and
CEC, and to the courts as well. While the examination of ConEC
was formal, CEC consideration was very  late. The applicant's
appeals lodged with the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court
were  not addressed adequately either (in particular, the Supreme
Court relied on extremely formalistic reasons to avoid examining the
substance  of the  complaint).  In this respect, the  Court recalled the
Venice  Commission's Code  of Good Practices in Electoral Matters,
which  cautions against excessive  formalism, and  found that such a
rigid and overly  formalistic approach was not justified under the
Convention. (paras 80-87).
The  Court concluded  that  the applicant's complaints concerning
election irregularities were not effectively addressed at the domestic
level and were dismissed in an arbitrary manner.
Note: Namat  Aliyev case was referred to as a precedent case in the
case of Karimova vs Azerbaijan (see mentioned case, paras 44-45)
3. [Flora] Kerimova v. Azerbaijan, Application No.20799/06, 30
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə