Seçkilərə dair qanunvericiliyin analizi: beynəlxalq normalar, problemlər və perspektivlər



Yüklə 5.01 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə14/15
tarix30.11.2016
ölçüsü5.01 Kb.
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15

8
, Applications No. 18475/06;
22444/06), 10 January 2012
Both applicants are  well-known opposition politicians. Both
applicants stood for the  elections to the  parliament  in 2005 in
different constituencies. According to the election results declared
by the CEC, both were winners. Then CEC submitted the results to
the Constitutional Court for review and approval. The Constitutional
Court approved the election results in 115 from  121 electoral
constituencies and  invalidated  the  results in  the  remaining six
constituencies, including the  ones where  the  applicants stood for
election. According to the Applicants` claims that, the decision of
the Constitutional Court lacked any reasoning/substantiation      and
factual ground, contained merely common.
8
Kerimli and Alibeyli v Azerbaijan,
http://bit.ly/1E9l1iM

171
The Court noted that the Constitutional Court’s decision gives rise to
serious issues concerning its factual and  legal  substantiation.
Specifically, the only factual detail referred to in the decision was
that the    Constitutional    Court had received a letter    from    the
Prosecutor General’s Office  informing it  that  criminal  proceedings
had been instituted against the chairmen and members of ten polling
stations in the first applicant’s constituency  for “falsification of
electoral documents”, and against four members of the ConEC of the
second  applicant’s constituency for “abuse of official authority”.
However, the Court considered that, in the absence of any  further
detailed elaboration, the mere fact that criminal  proceedings were
instituted in connection with some alleged and vaguely  described
abuses does not, in itself, constitute sufficient and relevant enough a
reason to annul the elections in any given constituency as a whole. In
particular, the Constitutional Court failed to establish whether the
fact that these abuses had actually taken place had been proved and,
if so, whether they had been serious enough to impact on the results
of the  election to such an  extent  as to  render impossible  the
determination of the  electorate’s opinion in  each  constituency
affected. Moreover, the election results in ten polling stations of the
first applicant’s constituency has been considered by CEC and it was
determined that the overall constituency    results had not been
affected by  those abuses to a degree requiring the annulment of the
election. (para 38)
The  Constitutional Court’s decision failed to specify  the breaches
affected the vote count so serious as to render the determination of
the voters’ choice impossible. Moreover, it  did not specify
information
regarding
ovservance
of
the
strict  procedural
requirements of the  Electoral  Code  concerning  the  invalidation of
election results had been met, and so on. All of these  crucial
questions either  remained  unanswered or were ignored. In such
circumstances,  the Court cannot but conclude that  the impugned
decision was unsubstantiated  in respect of both factual  grounds and
legal reasoning. (para 39)
Moreover, it    appears that    the affected parties, including each
applicant  as a  winning candidate, were  excluded  from  the
proceedings. In particular, they had never been given access to any
documentary material or the “specialists’ opinions” allegedly relied

172
on by the Constitutional Court as a basis for its decision or provided
with any other information as to the grounds for this decision.
Neither had they been given an opportunity  to participate in the
hearing  or to  otherwise defend their interests, either  in  writing or
orally. In the  Court’s opinion, whereas the  decision of the
Constitutional Court was final and at the  same time had a severe
impact on the effective exercise by    both the candidates and
thousands of voters in the  relevant  constituencies of their respective
electoral  rights, the failure to afford the affected parties any
procedural safeguards  was  especially serious  as  no  appeals  were
available to remedy the situation. (para 40)
The Court concluded that the Constitutional Court’s decision was
not based on any  relevant or sufficient reasons, did not afford any
procedural safeguards to the affected parties, and lacked any degree
of transparency. (para 41)
8. Abil v. Azerbaijan, Application No. 16511/06, 21 February 2012
9
The  applicant  stood for the elections to the parliament in 2005, and
was registered as a candidate by the ConEC.
In the period of electoral proceedings, the ConEC held a meeting in
the applicant’s absence and decided to apply to the Court of Appeal
with a request to cancel his registration as a candidate owing to
reports of his engaging in activities incompatible  with the
requirements of the Electoral  Code.  In particular, the  ConEC noted
that  it  had received a number of written statements from voters
claiming that the applicant had promised them money in exchange
for their promise to vote for him. The Court of Appeal referring to
the  ConEc request for the  applicant’s disqualification cancelled his
registration as a candidate. The applicant lodged an cassation appeal.
The Supreme Court dismissed the applicant’s appeal and upheld the
Court of Appeal’s judgment. The Applicant argued that the evidence
used  against  him had been  fabricated, that the persons who  had
testified against him were false witnesses.
After exhausting the domestic remedies, the Applicant applied to
EctHR and claimed the violation of his right to elections granted
9
Abil v Azerbaijan,
http://bit.ly/1JABM9e

173
under Article 3 of the Protocol 1.
The  Court  reiterated that  for the  purposes of supervision of the
compatibility  of the interference with the requirements of Article 3,
the  Court must scrutinise the  relevant domestic procedures and
decisions in   detail in   order   to   determine   whether sufficient
safeguards against arbitrariness were afforded  to the  applicant  and
whether the relevant decisions were sufficiently  reasoned (para 34)
Furthermore, the Court considered that, in order to prevent arbitrary
disqualification of candidates, the  relevant  domestic  procedures
should contain sufficient  safeguards protecting the  candidates from
abusive and unsubstantiated allegations of electoral misconduct, and
that decisions on disqualification should be based on sound, relevant
and sufficient proof of such misconduct. (para 35)
Turning to the present case, the Court noted that only  eight out of
seventeen persons who had   written complaints accusing the
applicant of bribery  were heard by  the Court of Appeal. Seven of
these eight persons testified that they had been offered money by
some  unknown people  in  exchange  for a  promise to  vote for the
applicant. The Court considered that this information, by itself, does
not  prove  that  the alleged offer of a bribe  originated  from  the
applicant. There existed no further evidence linking the applicant
with the  alleged actions of those “unknown people”  who had
allegedly offered bribes to voters. (para 36) The Court notes that, it
is true that one person testified in court that the applicant had offered
him money personally. However, the Court notes that the applicant
managed to verify that he was not registered in the voter lists of his
constituency  and that he had lied in court about his registered
address of primary residence. İt challenged the truthfulness of that
persons statements. However, this objection was ignored by  the
domestic courts. (para  37) The ConEC did  not inform  the  applicant
about its  hearing, depriving him of the possibility to defend  his
position Moreover, the  domestic courts failed to  take  into  account,
and provide any reasoned response to, the applicant’s objections and
submissions. (para 39) The Applicant    was not afforded with
sufficient procedural guarantees and it was accordingly a violation of
Article 
3.

174
9. Khanhuseyn Aliyev v. Azerbaijan
10
, Application No. 19554/06,
21 February 2012
The applicant stood for the elections to the National Assembly of 6
November 2005 as a candidate and the Constituency  Electoral
Commission (ConEC) registered him as a candidate. In the process
of election, ConEC decided to apply  to the Court of Appeal with a
request to cancel the applicant’s registration as a candidate owing to
the reports of his alleged involvement in activities incompatible with
the  requirements of the Electoral Code.  The applicant was not
informed about this meeting in advance and was not invited to it.
The  Appeal  Court cancelled the applicant’s registration in basis of
this request. The applicant lodged an appeal with the Supreme Court,
arguing that the allegations against him had been fabricated and that
the evidence used against him had been tenuous, uncorroborated and
wrongly  assessed. In support of his submissions, he attached, inter
alia, the above-mentioned affidavits by  the ConEC members. The
Supreme Court  dismissed  the  applicant’s appeal  and  upheld the
Court of Appeal’s judgment.
After exhaustion of domestic remedies, the applicant lodged
complaint  before ECtHR and  claimed there  has been a  violation of
Article 3 of Protocol 1.
The Court noted that the summary  of its case-law on the right to
effectively stand for election, as guaranteed by Article 3 of Protocol
No. 1 to the Convention, can be found in, among many  other
judgments, Orujov v. Azerbaijan. Relying to this decision the Court
also reiterated that, while the Contracting States enjoy a wide margin
of appreciation; it has to satisfy itself that the conditions do not
curtail the rights in question to such an extent as to impair their very
essence and deprive them of their effectiveness; that they  are
imposed in pursuit of a legitimate aim; and that the means employed
are not disproportionate or arbitrary (paras 30 and 34).
The Court noted that in the present case, the decision to disqualify
the applicant was based on the written statements by four voters and
“physical evidence” consisting of several banknotes. For the reasons
specified below, the Court considers that this material, and the
10
Khanhuseyn Aliyev v Azerbaijan,
http://bit.ly/1WKJIsh

175
manner in which it was examined, did not amount to sound, relevant
and sufficient proof of the allegation that the applicant had attempted
to bribe voters (para35).
The  Court stressed that  as to the banknotes in the absence of any
special marks or a forensic report on the examination of fingerprints,
these random banknotes, by themselves, could not constitute any
kind of proof that they had been used as an instrument of bribery and
had been given by the applicant to the voters. Accordingly, this so-
called “physical evidence” was irrelevant (para 36). As to the written
statements by  four voters, the Court noted that none of those four
persons were invited to be questioned in the relevant hearings by the
electoral commission  or  the courts  and no  attempt was made to
obtain any further information corroborating those statements. Given
that  there were so few complainants and that  their brief written
statements were the only    relevant evidence used against the
applicant,  the  questioning of those voters in  person during  the
relevant  hearings was crucial  for the  assessment  of their personal
integrity  and
the
truthfulness
of
their
statements.
In
such
circumstances, the Court considered that the evidence used against
the applicant was not corroborated by  further examination and was
not assessed in a manner that would remove serious doubts as to its
reliability (para 37).
In particular, the ConEC did not inform  the applicant about its
hearing, did not invite  and hear the complainants or otherwise
attempt to carry out a comprehensive assessment of the situation,
and  took the  decision to  request the  applicant’s disqualification in
very  questionable circumstances given that several members of the
ConEC subsequently claimed that there had been no ConEC meeting
on that date at all  (para 39). In the present case, it appears that the
examination of the issue of the  applicant’s disqualification took
place without any reasonable advance notice, and as such caught him
by  surprise and left him unprepared for the hearing (para 40). The
domestic courts failed to  assess the relevance  of the applicant’s
submissions (para 41).
Thus, the cancellation of applicant’s registration was happened
without sufficient guarantees against arbitrariness.

176
10. Atakishi v. Azerbaijan, Application No. 18469/06, 28 February
2012
11
The applicant stood for the elections to the National Assembly of 6
November 2005 as a candidate and the Constituency  Electoral
Commission (ConEC) registered him as a candidate. In the process
of election, ConEC decided to apply  to the Court of Appeal with a
request to  cancel  the  applicant’s registration as a  candidate.  The
ConEC in this request relied on two basis: firstly, it noted that it had
received a  written complaint  from  a voter  (H.S.) claiming that  the
applicant    had given him    money; secondly, the applicant    had
regularly insulted his opponents and the government in his campaign
speeches and publications and physically disrupted his opponents’
meetings with voters. The  Appeal Court basing  on these  arguments
cancelled the applicant’s registration of  candidacy. The applicant
lodged appeal on this decision and alleged he had not been informed
of the ConEC meeting. The  documents were contradictory  and
“falsified”. The Court of Appeal  had not heard any  of the
complainants. As to the “complaints by  voters”, the court  had not
even attempted to verify whether they had been authored by existing
persons. Moreover, despite the fact that H.S. had sent a retraction of
his accusations to the  ConEC  and the Court of Appeal and had
personally  attended the hearing, the court had refused to hear him.
The Supreme Court dismissed the applicant’s appeal and upheld the
Court of Appeal’s judgment.
After exhaustion of domestic remedies, the applicant lodged
complaint  before ECtHR and  claimed there  has been a  violation of
Article 3 of Protocol 1.
The Court noted that the summary  of its case-law on the right to
effectively stand for election, as guaranteed by Article 3 of Protocol
No. 1 to the Convention, can be found in, among many  other
judgments, Orujov v. Azerbaijan. Relying to this decision the Court
also reiterated that, while the Contracting States enjoy a wide margin
of appreciation; it has to satisfy itself that the conditions do not
curtail the rights in question to such an extent as to impair their very
essence and deprive them of their effectiveness; that they are
11
Atakishi v Azerbaijan,
http://bit.ly/1JrgAAB

177
imposed in pursuit of a legitimate aim; and that the means employed
are not disproportionate or arbitrary (para 37 and 41).
The Court noted that as to the first ground, the only  evidence
available was a written statement by  H.S. where he noted that the
applicant had given him money  in exchange  for his services as an
intermediary  in bribing voters. However, the Court notes that H.S.
was never heard in person either by the ConEC or the domestic
courts, despite the fact  that, according to  the  applicant, he  was
physically  present in the Court of Appeal building during the
hearing. H.S. sent several statements to the relevant courts and other
authorities whereby he repeatedly retracted any statements that could
be  construed as accusations against the applicant. However, these
subsequent statements were not taken into account by  the domestic
courts. the Court considers that the evidence relied on by the courts
was insufficient and, in any event, was not assessed in a manner that
would remove legitimate doubts as to its reliability (para 43).
As to the second ground  for  the applicant’s  disqualification,  the
Court notes that part of the evidence presented by the ConEC in this
regard consisted of several short statements and telegrams by various
persons accusing the applicant, in general terms, of using insults and
offensive language in  respect  of his opponents. None of these
complaints provided any  specific details of inappropriate or illegal
behaviour by the applicant. The courts failed to verify the identities
of the authors of these complaints, to seek more detailed information
from them as to the specific alleged misconduct by the applicant, to
corroborate that information with any additional evidence, or to hear
any  of the complainants in person and thus give the applicant an
opportunity  to defend himself against their allegations. Thus, these
written statements, in  themselves, could not be    considered as
proving any factual circumstance, let alone any illegal conduct by
the  applicant  (para 44). The  other part of the evidence  presented by
the ConEC consisted of written complaints by  opponent candidate.
This situation demanded exceptional scrutiny by the courts charged
with  the task  of assessing  their  truthfulness.  However,  domestic
courts did not conduct such examination. Furthermore, as regards the
legal basis for the applicant’s disqualification on the second ground,
the Court notes that the domestic courts relied on Articles 88.1 and
88.2 of the Electoral Code. However, they failed to provide any legal
reasoning for their decision to class the alleged misconduct by the

178
applicant as falling within the ambit of those provisions. The ConEC
did not inform  the applicant  about its hearing. The domestic courts
did not examine properly  arguments of the applicant The applicant
was not  afforded sufficient time to examine the material in the case
file and to prepare arguments in his defence, as he had been notified
of the forthcoming judicial hearing only a very  short time before it
began (paras 45-48).
Therefore, candidacy  of the applicant cancelled without sufficient
guarantees against arbitrariness.
11. Karimov v. Azerbaijan, Application No. 12535/06, 25 September
2014
12
The  applicant  stood in  the elections to the  parliament in  2005 as a
candidate of the opposition party. There were polling stations set up
shortly before the elections exclusively for military  servicemen
belonging to military  units permanently  stationed within the
constituency. The official election results in the constituency showed
that  the  applicant finished in  second  place.  The  winning candidate
received a bit more than him. The Applicant could determine that,
the significant part of his opponent`s total vote count had been cast
in the polling stations created exclusively for military  voting. The
applicant lodged a complaint with the CEC requesting invalidation
of the results of the polling stations created exclusively  for such
militaries. He complained, inter alia, of that, pursuant  to the  law
military servicemen should vote in ordinary polling stations. Special
military  polling stations should be set up only  in exceptional
circumstances. In this case, there were  no such exceptional
circumstances. The ConEC applied the  legislation not  in  proper
manner. In support of the above complaints, the applicant submitted
copies of written observations made at those polling stations. The
CEC  dismissed the claim.  The  Applicant  appealed  with Court  of
Appeal, but it  rejected his appeal. The Applicant filed cassation
complaint  against this decision. The  Supreme  Court dismissed  his
complaint as well.
After  exhausting  the domestic remedies,  the applicant applied to
EctHR and claimed the violation of his right to elections granted
12
Karimov v Azerbaijan,
http://bit.ly/1Jnh5qS

179
under Article 3 of the Protocol 1.
In particular, the Court has had regard to the observations made in
the Final Report of the OSCE/ODIHR Election Observation Mission
regarding the military  voting in the 2005 parliamentary  elections.
According to the rules military  personnel were to vote in ordinary
polling stations. The observers noted that  special military  polling
stations had been set up in the absence of the requisite  exceptional
circumstances. They also noted that the election procedures in those
polling stations had lacked transparency  because the electoral
authorities had delegated responsibility  for the organisation and
conduct of military voting to the Ministry  of Defence. Considering
the Article 35.5 of the Electoral Code, establishing the
rule  of
voting of military personnel, in this connection, the Court conculded
that, in order for the exception to apply  to set up military  polling
stations, the following conditions were required by Article 35.5 of
the Electoral Code: (i) the unit had to be located outside a populated
settlement; (ii) the travel time by public  transport to the closest
ordinary  polling station had to exceed one hour; and (iii) the total
number of servicemen in the unit had to exceed fifty. It is clear from
the wording of Article 35.5 that all of the above conditions had to be
met for the exception to apply; in other words, those three conditions
were cumulative  and not  alternative.  In the  present  case, the  total
number of personnel serving in each of the two military units in
question exceeded fifty. It  follows that, in relation to the conditions
required by the exception stipulated by Article 35.5 of the Electoral
Code were not satisfied.
The  fact that the “voting results” from  those polling stations were
then taken into account by the electoral authorities, with a significant
impact on the overall election result. The  Court found out as
unreasonably  the domestic courts rejection of the applicant`s
complaint  on the  erroneous application of the  legislation. For the
analogous unreasonably  rejection practice the court referred to
Namat Aliyev case (compare Namat Aliyev, cited above, § 90).
Subsequently, the  Court  found out  the  violation of right to  free
elections.

180
12. Tahirov v. Azerbaijan, Application No. 31953/11, 11 June 2015
13
The    applicant    nominated    himself to stand    as an    independent
candidate in the parliamentary elections of 7 November 2010,
applied for registration as a candidate,  and  submitted to the
Constituency Electoral Commission (“the ConEC”) voter signatures
collected which  legislation required in support  of his candidacy.
ConEC refused the applicant’s registration application and justified
its decision that expert group found that voter signatures required in
support of candidacy  had invalid (falsified) and number of the
remaining valid  signatures was below number  which  legislation
required.  The  applicant lodged a  complaint to Central Election
Commission (CEC). CEC  dismissed  this complaint.  The  applicant
lodged an appeal to Appeal Court on decision of CEC. Appeal Court
dismissed this complaint. The  applicant lodged further appeal to
Supreme  Court on decision of Appeal Court. The  Supreme Court
dismissed this complaint.
After exhaustion of domestic remedies, the applicant lodged
complaint  before ECtHR, alleged, in particular, that  he  had been
arbitrarily refused
registration
as
a
candidate
in
the
2010
parliamentary elections, and claimed this has been a violation of
Article 3 of Protocol 1.
The  Court found that  in the present case the following should be
determined: the procedure  for verifying the compliance  with  this
eligibility  condition was conducted in a manner affording sufficient
safeguards against an arbitrary decision. The Court noted that it pay
attention to  report  of OSCE/ODIHR Mission in  2010 parliamentary
elections in this issue.  The report  notes that the  OSCE  observers
expressed serious concerns regarding the impartiality  of ConECs,
which generally  appeared to favor candidates nominated by  the
ruling party    or incumbent independent candidates, particularly
during  the  candidate registration process where  all  YAP-nominated
candidates were registered while  over  half  of opposition-nominated
candidates and many  self-nominated candidates were refused
registration. With regard to the registration process, they  further
observed a general lack of openness and transparency in the activity
of many ConECs and noted that the electoral commissions did not
13
Tahirov v Azerbaijan,
http://bit.ly/1Eb8Ouo

181
respect a number of statutory  safeguards. The provisions of the
Electoral
Code
were
implemented
unfairly  restrictively
and
prospective candidates were denied the right to stand based on minor
technical mistakes and without due  consideration of the principle of
proportional  responses to errors, enshrined in domestic  legislation.
Furthermore,  complaints challenging ConEC decisions refusing
registration, most of which   were   dismissed by the CEC   as
groundless without strict examination.
The Court noted that despite a question put by  the Court to the
Government  in this respect,  the Government  have  not  provided
sufficiently  specific information about the qualifications and
credentials of the experts in  the  present  case. The Government
simply noted that all working group experts had been  appointed
from among “employees government agencies”, without specifying
whether the    experts charged    with conducting the    handwriting
analysis were actually  qualified to do so by their occupation. As a
result, the Court found that experts were not reliable for professional
occupancy.
In addition, the  Court  noted  that  in the present case, the decision of
expert groups on invalid signatures were in arbitrary  character.
Relevant examination neither conducted by  election commissions.
Electoral commissions respected neither of the safeguards mentioned
too. Procedure in CEC was not qualified.
The domestic courts did not address the applicant’s complaints about
any  of the above-mentioned deficiencies either, even though the
applicant’s appeals contained prima facie well-founded complaints,
referred to the relevant provisions of the domestic law, and disclosed
an   appearance   of arbitrariness in the   electoral   commissions’
decisions In this part Court relied as a precedent decisions of Namat
Aliyev and Hasan  Karimov’s cases. Such conditions were not
compatible with the rule of law and protecting the integrity  of the
election.
As a result the Court found that there has been a violation of Article
3 of Protocol 1.

182
THE FINALIZING SUMMARY
of THE PRECEDENT CASES in respect to AZERBAIJAN
REPUBLIC
related to THE ARTICLE 3 of THE PROTOCOL 1
(Includes revision of both judgments of ECtHR and decisions of the
Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe)
THE  European Court  of Human Rights (ECtHR) adopted  12
judgements on Azerbaijan  Republic  regarding violations of the
Article 3 of the Protocol  1 (right  to free and fair elections) of the
European  Convention
for Protection
of Human  Rights
and
Fundamental Freedoms (ECHR).
These violations were of various character related to non-observance
of the procedural rules stipulated by  election law for the period of
elections, arbitrarily committed in respect to the rights of opposition
and independent candidates by the election commissions, and by the
courts as well.
These judgments can be classified as following:
1)
Violations related to non-registering of the candidates –
Seyidzade case, Tahirov case;
2)
Violations
regarding
annulation
of
the
registration
of
candidacy – Orujov case, Khanhuseyn Aliyev case, Abil case,
Atakishi case;
3)
Violations regarding baseless cancellation of the election
results – Karimova case, Mammadov #2 case, Arif Hajili case;
4)
Violations related to the election violations and other offences
and inefficiency  of the investigation of the complaints against
such violations. – Namat Aliyev case, Hasan Karimov case;
5)
Violations related to cancellation by the Constitutional Court
the  MP mandate obtained as result of elections, without
complying with the procedures set by the electoral legislation –
Karimli and Alibayli case.
It should be mentioned that  the Court  found out the  below
mentioned violations:
A)
In the case of “Seyidzade v. Azerbaijan”, the Court pointed
to the issue of the quality of the law and noted that, legislation

183
and relevant juridical practice do not clearly give a definition for
“clergyman” and “professional religious activity” terms. In such
circumstances, the refusal to register candidacy  of the applicant
(though he has already resigned from all positions), fails to be in
compliance with the principle of foreseeability;
B)
In all other judgments related to Azerbaijan, the Court
found out the violations mainly based on two factors: firstly, the
decisions were  not  substantiated  and  secondly, the  procedural
safeguards were not applied.
Only  the one – Tahirov case from abovementioned ones was
regarding 2010 parliamentary elections, as all the rest were regarding
2005 parliamentary elections.
Other  decisions (judgments) adopted  on Azerbaijan were  regarding
lack  of sufficient  guarantees; and regarding unreasonable  and
arbitrarily  refusal of the election complaints both by electoral
commissions and the domestic courts.
With regard to the decisions of the electoral commissions
(constituency electoral commissions
(“ConEC”) and  Central
Election Commission
(“CEC”), the ECtHR, in particular, found
the following irregularities:
14
a.
the applicants’ complaints and evidence were dismissed
without motivation;
b.
the statements and witness testimony against the applicants
were  accepted without  a  proper examination to determine their
truthfulness and credibility  (see in particular the Namat Aliyev
case and the sub-group Orujov);
c.
the lack of independent examination and reasoning in the
decisions cancelling the applicants’ registration as candidates or
their election;
d.
the applicants’ lack of participation in the hearing (see in
particular the Orujov sub-group).
14
Pending cases: current state of execution (Namat Aliyev v Azerbaijan)
http://bit.ly/1hzC584

184
With regard to  the  decisions of the  domestic  courts (including the
Supreme  Court),  the  Court,  in particular, found the  following
shortcomings:
a.
the refusal to examine evidence submitted and failure to
take steps ex officio to clarify  outstanding issues owing to
excessive formalism stemming from the civil procedure rules
(see in particular the Namat Aliyev case);
b.
the domestic courts merely and simply reiterated the
findings made by the electoral commissions;
c.
the applicants did not have sufficient time to prepare their
defence in the expedited procedure;
d.
the erroneous application of the electoral law.
Note: In Gambar and others case  (2010) the Court accepted the
unilateral declaration of the  Government  to eliminate electoral
irregularities and held the  decision to strike  out  of the  list the
applications.      The violations in the case uniting seven cases had
similarities with violations in the Namat Aliyev case.
The Court stated regarding the provisions of the legislation in
the cases related to Azerbaijan as following:
a)
In the case of Seyidzade the Article 14 of the Electoral
code of Azerbaijan Republic (incompatibility of the positions) –
it was determined that, in this and other provisions the definition
of clergyman was not stipulated clearly;
b)
In the cases of Kerimova, Arif Hajılı, Mammadov No 2
Court came to conclusion that the Articles 106 and 114.5 of the
AR EC was applied erroneously;
c)
In the cases of Orujov, Abil, Khanhuseyn Aliyev and
Atakishi it  was concluded that the Articles 106 and 114.5 of  the
AR EC were applied erroneously;
d)
In the cases of Karimli and Alibayli it was concluded that
Articles of AR EC 108.4, 112.8, 114.5, 170.2.2 were not observed
by the Constitutional Court;
e)
In the case of Karimov it has been found that, Article 35.5 of
the
EC 
of 
AR
was 
violated.

185
The Committee of Ministries of the Council of Europe (CMCE) - the
body  which has the function to control execution of ECtHR
judgements, started to  control cases on Azerbaijan which  had been
adopted since 2013.
Prior to review of the CMCE meetings on execution, it is important
to  mention the  general  conclusion of CMCE with regard to  such
execution activity. In 2014-2015 years CMCE came  to  conclusion
that the following results in execution cases were achieved:
1) Concerning the electoral commissions, the Committee considered
that the  reforms adopted  in addition to training measures, and in
particular, the  introduction of expert groups, would not be
sufficient to  resolve  the problems revealed as regards the
independence, transparency and legal  quality of the procedure
before these commissions;
2) Regarding the effectiveness of judicial  review, the Committee
noted  with interest the  measures adopted  (including training
measures;    the    introduction,
in    2011,
of
the    Code    of
Administrative Procedure for electoral disputes to remedy the
excessive formalism previously imposed by  the Code of Civil
Procedure; and a series of measures to improve the independence
of the judiciary, particularly  in the light of the recommendations
made  during expertise in the  framework of the Eastern
Partnership);  but  noted  at the  same time that the  effectiveness of
these reforms would have to be demonstrated in practice.
At  the meeting of CMCE  #1179,  held on  September 24-26,  2013,
initial  decision regarding supervision (the  execution case was
commonly  named as “Namat Aliyev Group”) on 9 decisions out of
the  decisions accepted  regarding the Republic  of Azerbaijan
(excluding only  Seyidzade case for its differences in its substance,
Karimov case and Tahirov case as the decision was not  adopted  in
respect to them yet) was adopted.
CMCE began its supervision on these cases against Azerbaijan under
enhanced procedure. As it is known, CMCE has two procedures on
the supervision over execution of the decision: “standard procedure”
and “enhanced procedure”. The  rules regarding enhanced procedure
are being applied alongside with many other cases by the CMCE in

186
respect  to  the cases where  the  Court and the  Committee of the
Ministries have  found structural  and/  or complex problems. CMCE
has specified the  electoral  cases related to Azerbaijan as a  complex
problem.
At the meeting of CMCE #1179, held on September 24-26, 2013, in
the decision accepted in respect to the Republic of Azerbaijan in
the case of Namat Aliyev Group, it was mentioned as following:
15
-
recalled that these cases concern various violations of Article 3
of Protocol No. 1      in that the electoral commissions and the
courts decided in an arbitrary  manner and without motivation
upon the   complaints of the applicants (members of the
opposition parties or independent candidates) regarding the 2005
parliamentary  elections, and that  the [domestic] procedures
before  those instances did not afford safeguards against
arbitrariness;
-
underlined the importance, in every democratic society, of an
electoral system containing remedies to prevent arbitrariness;
-
regarding the individual measures [issued by the Court], noted
that it  is not  possible  to eliminate the effects of the violations
otherwise than by the just satisfaction awarded by the Court as
the  elections of November  2005 had been completed and their
results confirmed as final;
-
as concerns the general measures, noted the training and
awareness-raising activities put in place for the members of the
electoral commissions and  invited  the authorities to  provide an
assessment regarding the impact of these activities;
-
[CM] considered, however, that these activities alone do not
respond to the findings of the Court, in  particular the Court’s
conclusions
that
the    procedures
before    the
electoral
commissions and the  national courts did not  afford safeguards
against arbitrariness;
-
consequently invited the authorities to provide, as a matter of
urgency, a  consolidated action plan  with the measures taken or
underway, including legislative or statutory, to put in place such
safeguards;
-
decided to resume consideration of these issues at their 1186th
meeting (December 2013).
15
Decision adopted at the 1179th meeting (September 2013)
http://bit.ly/1JbNWSs

187
Accordingly, the CMCE came  to conclusion that,  the important
problem consists of the application of arbitrary  unsubstantiated and
arbitrary decisions by the election commissions and courts in respect
to the complaints of the candidates, and of the absence of procedures
affording  adequate safeguards  against arbitrariness.  It invited  the
Azerbaijani Government to file and apply  complex action plan
(including legislative  and  instructive changes) in  order to  reach out
the mentioned instructions.
In its meeting #1186 of 3-5 December 2013, the CMCE repeated the
results obtained  at the  previous meetings, calling the  Azerbaijani
Government to present complex action plan. Taken into account that
the  Government  of Azerbaijan introduced a  new information in this
meeting, in order to examine and assess this information it scheduled
the next supervision for the meeting #1193 (March, 2014).
16
Taking into account that  the Azerbaijani Government submitted
relevant information very late – in February  2014, the CMCE,
during  its meeting #1193 held on 4-6 March  2014, scheduled
revision of execution work to the meeting #1201 planned for June,
2014.
17
At the meeting #1201, held on June 2014 regarding the case of
Namat Aliyev Group, CMCE mentioned the following:
18
-
stressed the need to rapidly overcome the important problem of
the arbitrary  application of legislation and of the absence of
procedures affording adequate  safeguards against arbitrariness
and that this requires remedial action in a number of areas;
-
strongly encouraged the authorities to rapidly undertake further
reforms, taking into  account  the  recommendations made  in the
context of the Eastern partnership project;
-
noted with interest that judicial review in electoral matters is,
since 2009, no longer governed by the rigid rules of the Code of
Civil Procedure, but by the new, less formalistic, Code of
Administrative Procedure and invited the authorities to provide
a more detailed explanation of the way in which the new Code
16
Decision adopted at the 1186th meeting (December 2013)
http://bit.ly/1hzzgDR
17
Decision adopted at the 1193rd meeting (March 2014)
http://bit.ly/1Loz1VT
18
Decision adopted at the 1201st meeting (June 2014)
http://bit.ly/1WKKqph

188
is meant to resolve the problems revealed by the Court’s
judgments;
-
noted the potential of targeted practical guidance from the
Supreme    Court    and    stressed    the    importance of continued
training efforts to ensure the efficiency of judicial review;
-
regretted that no information has been provided regarding the
shortcomings
established
in  the  proceedings
before
the
Constitutional Court and urged the authorities to rapidly submit
this information;
-
as regards the functioning of the electoral commissions,
expressed  regret  that  the  information submitted, although
extensively  describing the present situation, does not allow a
comprehensive evaluation of progress made  as compared to the
situation criticised by the Court and invited the authorities to
submit, without delay, a detailed impact assessment of the
changes and how they may prevent new similar violations;
-
strongly encouraged the authorities, in the pursuit of their efforts
to resolve the problems raised by the present group of cases, to
take  full  advantage of the different co-operation and  assistance
programmes organised or proposed by the Council of Europe,
notably  in the context of the recently adopted Action Plan for
Azerbaijan;
-
decided, accordingly, to resume consideration of these questions
at the 1208th meeting (September 2014).
At the meeting #1208, held on June 23-25 September 2014
regarding the case of Namat Aliyev Group, CMCE mentioned:
19
-
concerning the functioning of electoral commissions, noted in
particular the clarifications given regarding the expert groups set
up in 2008 to assist those commissions but considered, however,
that this reform does not appear to resolve the problems revealed
by  the Court’s judgments as regards the independence,
transparency and legal  quality of the procedure before these
commissions;
-
therefore called upon the authorities to provide further
information on the above issues and on the additional measures
envisaged to remedy the outstanding problems and encouraged
19
Decision adopted at the 1208th meeting (September 2014)
http://bit.ly/1U6czCY

189
them to pursue their efforts to train the members of the electoral
commissions and of the expert groups;
-
concerning the functioning of the judiciary, noted with interest
that the introduction, in 2011, of the Code of Administrative
Procedure for electoral disputes, appears to respond to a series
of important problems raised by  the Court’s judgments in
the Namat Aliyev group of cases as regards the excessive
formalism of the courts when examining appeals;
-
as regards, in particular, the independence of the judiciary, noted
with interest the amendments adopted  to the  law on judges and
courts in  June 2014 reinforcing, notably, the  budgetary
independence  of the Judicial  and  Legal Council, amendments
which seem to respond to certain recommendations made in the
context of the Eastern Partnership project;
-
urged, however, the authorities to explore further measures,
taking into account the  different  proposals presented  before the
Committee, aimed at  limiting the influence  of the executive
within the Judicial and Legal Council  in the area of the
nomination, promotion and disciplinary  sanctions of judges; at
reinforcing the  Council’s competencies in  these  areas;  and at
improving the relevant regulatory framework;
-
underlined again the potential of targeted practical guidance
from the Supreme Court;
-
underlined further the importance of training efforts to ensure
the efficiency  of judicial control and invited the authorities to
take  into account the  additional possibilities offered in this
respect by  the Action Plan of the Council of Europe for
Azerbaijan 2014-2016;
-
as regards the shortcomings of the procedure before the
Constitutional Court identified by the European Court, invited
the  authorities to  provide  further clarifications concerning the
results of the examination of the Kerimli and Alibeyli judgment
by the General Assembly of the Constitutional Court in October
2012;
-
invited the authorities to provide, in particular on the actions
envisaged  or adopted to  resolve  them, and  decided to  resume
detailed examination of those issues at their meeting of March
2015.

20
Decision adopted at the 1222th meeting (March 2015)
http://bit.ly/1MJHPc0
190
At the meeting #1222, held on 12
th
of March 2015 regarding the
case of Namat Aliyev Group, CMCE mentioned:
20
-
as regards the independence, transparency and legal competence
of electoral  commissions, noted  that the  recent  information
provided is still  limited to training for members of these
commissions, and reiterated that such measures are not
sufficient of themselves to solve the problems identified by the
Court;
-
as regards the effectiveness of judicial review, noted with
interest the reforms achieved and, more recently, those of 30
December 2014, aimed notably at further limiting the influence
of the executive within the Judicial and Legal Council; noted at
the same time that the effectiveness of these reforms will have to
be demonstrated in practice;
-
reiterated the importance, in view of the imminence of the next
legislative elections in November 2015, of properly functioning
electoral commissions and of courts with the capacity to review
the legality of the decisions of these commissions;
-
therefore urged the authorities to initiate, without delay,  any
action capable of further improving the system of control of the
regularity of these elections in order to prevent any arbitrariness
and, in particular to:
a) co-operate with the Venice Commission and make full
use of the additional possibilities offered by the Action Plan
of the Council of Europe for Azerbaijan;
b) make  sure that a  clear message  is sent  to electoral
commissions by  the highest competent authorities that no
illegality nor arbitrary action will be tolerated;
-
underlined, in this context, the crucial importance of targeted
practical guidance from  the Supreme Court, based on the
European  Court’s judgments, complemented,  if necessary, by
appropriate instructions to electoral commissions;
-
also underlined the importance of ensuring that the proceedings
before  the  Constitutional  Court  provide the  guarantees required
by the Convention, in particular, as regards the right to appear in
person before it and with regard to transparency (case of Kerimli
and 
Alibeyli).

191
-
invited the authorities to provide their answers and decided to
resume  consideration of these issues at their 1230th meeting
(June 2015).
At the meeting #1230, held on 9-11 June 2015, regarding the case
of
Namat 
Aliyev 
Group,
the
CMCE
reiterated 
the
grounds/principals  adopted  in  the meeting  held in  March  2015.
Moreover, respectively  with conduction of some  issues practically
CM stressed the following:
21
-
training measures, in particular as regards the requirements of
the Convention, both for members of electoral commissions and
for judges to improve their sensitivity towards the requirements
of a comprehensive preparation of cases in electoral matters and
for the reasoning of decisions;
-
measures to be taken at the level of electoral commissions to
ensure the legal capacity  of expert groups, notably by  ensuring
that qualified lawyers are always included among the members
of these groups, and by  moreover organising their procedure to
ensure the transparency  and independence required by the
Convention;
-
the development of jurisprudential guides, in particular through
a resolution of the Plenum  of the Supreme Court (based on the
new Code of  Administrative Procedure, applicable for the first
time in parliamentary elections);
-
ensuring, by appropriate means, the right of parties to participate
in  the  proceedings before  the  Constitutional  Court  and the
transparency of the proceedings before it.
At the  same time, due  to  the  forthcoming 2015 parliamentary
elections CM referring to the decision of March 2015 and repeating
the    position stipulated thereby, emphasized    the importance to
conduct  urgent measures indicated in decisions regarding all
execution cases. The Committee also noted that the Government did
not furnished any renew information to the Committee in respect to
concrete measures required with the decision adopted in March
2015.
21
Decision adopted at the 1230th meeting (June 2015)
http://bit.ly/1Jbznwd

192
CM appointed  to continue  the  supervision on execution case of
Namat Aliyev Group at the meeting #1236 of the CM planned to be
held in September 2015.
RESUME:
The  Government  of Azerbaijan did not take  effective  steps to meet
requirements of CMCE issued in respect to it  in the case of Namat
Aliyev group. CMCE concluded  that  the  violations found out by
ECtHR in the electoral cases were specifically  structural and
complex.  In this regard, enhanced  procedure  of supervision in
respect to the case of Namat  Aliyev was launched. CMCE required
the Azerbaijani Government to make the necessary amendments
during execution at the election commissions and the courts.
However, steps made by  the Azerbaijani Government on the
execution were  incomplete.  As a  result, CMCE found measures
conducted by  the Government of Azerbaijan unsatisfactory. On the
other hand, it was mentioned that reforms in the field of the judicial
supervision   are   being
applied.   CMCE
considered   that   the
reformative measures implemented in the judicial supervision should
be reflected in practice.
The  conclusion on the topic reviewed is that the Republic of
Azerbaijan failed to apply  the effective reforms capable to ensure
necessary reasonable procedural safeguards in the election system in
order to grant electoral rights. With great probability  such reforms
will not be ready  until the Committee’s meeting #1236 planned for
September 
2015

193
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə